11

You can definitely go for one pair. I've actually been pleasantly surprised at the quality of the optics at almost the bottom end of the market, if you go for something common like 8x20. We've got 8x, 10x and 12x for wildlife (mainly). None were expensive. The 12x50s are great at dusk but lack the close focus for garden birds or some hides. The 8x20s are ...


8

I researched this and there are a few factors Aperture - This is the diameter of the objective (or front) lens and affects the amount of light taken in. Aperture is very important for low light situations. If you plan on using your binoculars near dawn or dusk, or under canopy, then you want a larger aperture. This is the second number used to describe ...


8

(Ah, I meant this as a comment to Chris' post. Oh well, I guess I need to try making it a real answer.) For tracking moving objects, a wide field of view (FOV) may also be helpful. (Apparent FOV will be larger than actual FOV, e.g. a pair with a 7° real FOV may have a 52° AFOV: Sport Optics. If you wear glasses, look for a pair with long eye relief (e.g. ...


5

You can buy any of a number of anti fog gels and materials that are made for scuba gear, but also work great for binoculars. That said, we always just solved this problem by spitting on the lenses and wiping. It's gross, but it worked.


5

The basic problem being dealt with here is that your eyes don't necessarily focus identically. So, what these do is let you compensate for that difference. The main focus knob changes the focus for both eyes together. You use this to deal with the distance to the subject. The second knob with the "+" and"-" adjusts the focus for only one eye relative to ...


5

Don't concentrate on the magnification (strength) for your first binoculars for airplane viewing, especially if you'll be using them for an additional activity as well (bird watching). Concentrate on getting a binocular with a wide field of view. You'll learn enough from these binoculars to decide which magnification you really want when you buy your next ...


5

(As addition to the other answers) This also depends on whether you're going to use a tripod or not. If you're not planning to use a tripod, I recommend getting maximum a 10x magnification, which is about the limit of what you can hold without shaking too much. Then you should consider the field of view as well as the lens diameter. A bigger diameter ...


5

To choose a good set, you first need to understand the behind the specs. Usually, binos are referred by two numbers, A x B The number (A) before the x is the magnification factor, i.e how many times closer (larger) you see the object. The number after the x (B) is the diameter of the lenses in millimeters. Then, there is a third number that's the result ...


4

Optically, even cheap binoculars are very good these days so unless you need something special I wouldn't use this as a differentiator when looking. Instead the three I see as most important are size, weight and robustness. If they are going with you everywhere you need to make sure they will fit in your pack, not be too heavy and be able to take the odd ...


4

I tend to tuck mine inside my outer layer of clothing if it's cold but dry. This keeps the lenses warm so avoids condensation. It helps with camera battery life too.


4

The knob on the left is for adjusting the focus to the distance, the knob on the right is for diopter adjustment. Beside the center focusing wheel, there usually is a separate diopter adjustment that serves to compensate for unequal vision that might exist between the viewer's two eyes. The diopter adjustment, which often has a scale showing plus (+) and ...


3

In binocular I would say 8x25 for size and weight. I don't think you want weight or bulk of a 10x but if you are driving to the face then weight is not an issue. You can find some light 10x but for me at a 10x I like a longer binocular. Field of view is not important in spotting a route. For weight (and volume) I would go with monocular but then ...


2

Let me share my rather limited experience. I bought a 50BGN == $33 12-50x50* binoculars. Results: There are several small loose parts of plastic inside the binoculars. They obscure small parts of the lenses. Not a very big problem, and I accept it for the money. The 50 will collect more light through the large input lenses and provide crisper viewing, ...


1

I've hunted deer within 150 yards using 10x magnification and for the most part that was fine. However I encountered problems when trying to determine if a buck was a 2 point or a 4 point, which meant waiting / hoping for the animal to come closer or spending a lot longer studying the picture. Details like that can be critical when hunting and can make the ...


1

I find the Bushnel 10 x 90 0r 20x180 do a fair all round job. For around $60 U.S. 70 or 90 mm. lens. 90 is better for low light. 70 for daytime. These are made in China. The India made ones are junk. Remember the further away the more humidity in the way. Any thing over 20x you need a support to hold steady. But I use these most for setting up photos threw a ...


1

I use a very nice pair of 15x50 image stabilised binoculars for birding/wildlife. Yes, they're pretty heavy but when I can stand next to a birder with a dedicated spotting scope and see things that he can't, I'm pretty happy with myself. It's also pretty good for aviation and for casual star-gazing. The image stabilisation doesn't seem to affect image ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible