60

This is rather speculative, but draws on a few birding/wildlife books I've read and it's too much for a comment. It also has a little UK bias, but I've visited 4 continents on wildlife trips, and much of this seems universal. First, to get them out of the way: invertebrates may be interesting but in the general population there's a bit of a "yuck factor". ...


15

It's also a case of accessibility, birding really doesn't take any special equipment beyond say a pair of binoculars and birds will visit peoples backyards and bird feeders. While mammals can be shy or limited in area requiring trips to see them. Fish take special equipment to catch and mammals especially the biggers ones can often be dangerous to humans. ...


10

I'm not a bird-watcher myself, but I have bird-watchers in my family, so I had rich opportunity to observe their conversations on their hobby. Here's a collection of points that I think contribute to the appeal of bird-watching. Note that for reasons of homogenuity, I'll use websites and quotes mostly from the UK as an example in the following, but the ...


9

Asian Koel (wikipedia), specifically a female. CC-BY-SA 3.0 Wikipedia user Dougjj It's a member of the cuckoo family, and like other cuckoos it's a brood parasite. This species is found across much of southern and eastern Asia. The background of the pictures suggested India to me, confirmed by the OP's profile. I've only visited India once but I still ...


3

This might have to do with migrating behaviour. Different seasons will see different birds, hence more variety, and their arrival has more of an event character.


2

I'm not Australian, but, after a bit of research, it sounds like common blackbirds to me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPB4u-BfYFA


2

I found a quite nice explanation of all the considerations for binocular choice here. It gets a little technical near the end though. There's a bit to unpack here - you are a little off about the second number of the binoculars - the first number is the magnification. This number tells you how many times closer an object will appear if you look at it from ...


2

If you want to see something from 100 yards away as if it were 1 foot away, you can work out what magnification you need. 100 yards is 300 feet. To make 300 feet seem like 1 foot, you need 300x magnification. That's the first number. (The second number is the objective lens diameter in mm.) 300x magnification basically does not exist in handheld binoculars, ...


1

Accessibility, and the sore thumbs of wearing funny hats and a pair of binoculars. This question is predicated on an observational bias. Walking out your front door wearing binoculars immediately identifies you as a bird watcher, as opposed to me: a cat watcher. And if you can walk ten feet without seeing a bird, you're just not looking hard enough. When ...


1

It's nothing more complicated than this: The hobby is accessible. Birds come to us. The suburbs are a very, very, very hostile place for land animals - vast and sterile by their standards, with pavement, lawns (no cover), structures, fences to impede mobility, and thick with predators (dogs and cats). So prairie dogs, salamanders, wolves, emus, giant ...


1

Yes and no; As a breeding/home territory robins do not like thick woods. They prefer an open woodland typical of single home suburbs ( in US). They want some open ground for foraging. Goldfinches like similar open woodlands. However , I see the large migrating flocks of robins in the thick forest ( E TX, piney woods).These loose flocks contain many thousands ...


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