8

I guess dirty water is better than no water. I don't think algae will kill them. The primary danger is parasites. Concrete cleaner is the easiest way to remove algae but be sure to rinse thoroughly. You can also get animal safe algaecide. I use a 5 gallon paint bucket for my dogs. In the summer by the time they finish it will have a little bit of ...


7

I found a paper from Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Providing Water for Birds While it does mention the usage of a pump or circulating water, it doesn't suggest it to attract birds. However, it says: The key to attracting a large number of birds is to keep your bath full of water at all times. Another article, Attracting Birds With Water states that: ...


5

I doubt there is a specific answer; I think different species have different preferences. In the Piney woods of east Texas , I have a couple traditional baths and a small pond with a 30 ft stream of recycled water ; 2 " deep 24 " wide. the birds use both. But while they go to the baths one at a time , several go to the stream at one time. The migrating ...


4

A few months ago, in November, 2017, we purchased a heated bird bath which fulfills all the criteria and more! It's a common type, and is sold by retailers world-wide. As I write this, in January, we've already had crazy weather with up to 40° degree changes in a single day, including record cold, and every form of precipitation. Here are the main features: ...


3

My experience is that birds prefer still water, even though it causes the need for more cleaning of a birdbath. I base my answer on much observation of our 2 acre pond at the bottom of my front yard. The pond has a natural supply of water flowing into it and, therefore, a constant exiting of water through a drainpipe. The flow in and out is slow, no ...


2

I would largely agree with the previous response. However, most bird bath heaters (a site I`m affiliated with) today do not get hot enough to melt plastic. If you have a plastic or resin bird bath, you can add an electric heater without worrying about it melting. This is because most heaters will keep the water warm up to about 40 degrees Fahrenheit. So, not ...


1

Here's the way I would go about it: Firstly, don't worry about efficiency. Heaters by their nature are close to 100% efficient. All the energy is turned to heat. That said, thermostatically controlled is a must. Some have multiple thermocouples for better reliability. Secondly: Two factors go together: Warranty period and ease of return, with greater ...


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