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60

This is rather speculative, but draws on a few birding/wildlife books I've read and it's too much for a comment. It also has a little UK bias, but I've visited 4 continents on wildlife trips, and much of this seems universal. First, to get them out of the way: invertebrates may be interesting but in the general population there's a bit of a "yuck factor". ...


44

They fly on the wing currents produced by the birds in front of them. It's similar to drafting someone in front of you while cycling or racing. The leader is breaking trail, and the followers are benefiting by exerting less energy. They end up in a V-formation as birds join up one after the other and find a wing to fly on. After a while, the leader gets ...


40

I believe this is a bar-headed goose. Source Source The Bar-headed Goose has a white head with distinctive black bars or stripes on its head, black extending down the front and back of the neck, leaving a white stripe down the sides of the neck, the upper parts and breast are medium grey, flanks are grey turning brown on rear flanks, vent and tail ...


26

You are indeed correct that robins use their eyes individually as they tilt their head from side to side. It's known as monocular vision, and is how they, and many other birds, locate their food, primarily worms and grubs. In May, 1965, an ornithologist named Dr. Frank Heppner published a 10-page report entitled Sensory Mechanisms and Environmental Clues ...


23

Two possibilities: There's something it thinks is food on the inside. Note that blue tits are quite clever at accessing food, to the extent of opening foil-topped milk-bottles (though the linked article illustrates this with a photo of a great tit!) At this time of year, more likely, it's not trying to get in, but sees its reflection as a rival or (as the ...


20

Yes, there is actually quite a bit of discussion you can find online. Bees in large numbers can keep hummingbirds away. They don't want to get stung either! However, you can lessen the bees by doing a couple things. The first is to maybe dilute your concentration of sugar. If you are doing a 4:1 solution of water to sugar you can do a 5:1 and that may ...


19

In the UK you should probably contact the RSPCA or RSPB. I think RSCPA is probably best as they actually do welfare stuff whereas RSPB is about conservation. They should have the best knowledge of whether the bird needs to be killed and how best to do it. I presume other countries have similar charities. If you need to kill the bird yourself I think the ...


18

For the same reason carrion birds circle over fresh kills: They're waiting for an opportunity to swoop in and get some food. All the gulls see is a large gathering of humans, which typically means dropped chips, bits of hotdog buns, discarded scraps, leftovers on tables, people throwing bits for the birds. Wherever you have big gatherings of large mammals ...


17

Birds do not typically reuse nests, as pests and parasites typically move in and use it as a habitat after the birds are done with it. Those birds who do reuse nests often don't have much success raising healthy chicks, because of said parasites. Also, predators have a much easier time finding food in nests that have been around for a while vs. having to ...


16

You'll actually want to prepare before you go hiking: Understand what hunting regulations are in force (ie is there an allowed hunt?) Use a whitelist rather than blacklist (ie understand the common birds you can shoot) Understand where you are allowed to shoot Then, once hiking, if you see a bird not on your whitelist, just leave it be. This way saves a ...


16

Cornell Labs has several good resources: Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Exploring and Conserving Nature. The Sibley app also has bird sounds you can compare to (as do several other mobile apps): Sibley Birds of North America There is supposed to be an app coming out which can identify automatically, but I have not yet found a copy of it to download. It's ...


15

It's also a case of accessibility, birding really doesn't take any special equipment beyond say a pair of binoculars and birds will visit peoples backyards and bird feeders. While mammals can be shy or limited in area requiring trips to see them. Fish take special equipment to catch and mammals especially the biggers ones can often be dangerous to humans. ...


14

We love crows! I live in America, where there are three main breeds of crow, including American Crows, Fish Crows, and Northwestern Crows. They're a bit different from the Common ravens, and other ravens, found in some other parts of the world. Although there are many varieties of each, their diets are fairly similar, so to make it easy for me, I'll call ...


14

The suds are caused by protein. Protein is usually consumed by the nitrogen cycle and finally plant life, but if there is enough water churning by wind and white caps and breaking waves it can froth up and dry out and get blown away and get trapped a gyre where is eventually melts back down into the water. Sometimes it gets blown into a beach as you've seen. ...


14

According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the name is Canada Goose. The big, black-necked Canada Goose with its signature white chinstrap mark is a familiar and widespread bird of fields and parks. Many of them are not even Canadian, having emigrated permanently south to the lower-48. Thousands of “honkers” migrate north and south each year, ...


14

The basic idea of turning them off temporarily is to let the birds readjust to their surroundings. For reasons still unknown to science, artificial light attracts birds, from fledgling seabirds to migrating songbirds (it does the same to moths). Once captivated, disoriented birds may crash into windows, or spend hours circling. The 9/11 tribute is ...


13

As a rancher, I routinely have to dispatch injured birds. If you don't have a knife handy, there are two ways: Grasp the bird by the head and use a whipping motion to decapitate. The body separates from the head. Toss the head. Another way is to do pretty much the same thing and rapidly rotate the body of the bird, but with less force - this breaks the ...


13

I agree with berry120 that contacting local experts, or even hobbyists will most likely be the easiest way to go. They should have a much better knowledge of local species than you would be able to find in (online) literature. Coming across plants or animals in the outdoors it's always interesting to identify them, but not always easy. In my experience, it'...


13

Providing water for birds in summer is always a brilliant idea, not just to drink but for them to have a nice bath in! Usually bird baths are actually kind of shallow, or rather the edges usually are dipping gently into a deeper pool in the middle. This kind of dish on a balcony would suffice. Our multipurpose bird feeder came with a rather small ...


13

TLDR: Yes they eat them, No they don't feel the heat. The tiny Bird’s Eye Chili originated in Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand, The Philippines, and surrounding countries, but they can now be found all over the world. They are presumably called Bird’s Eye Chili because of their small round shape and because they have been spread by birds, which are not ...


13

Looks like a female capercaillie to me. What killed it could be anything. Because the feathers seem pretty much intact I'd suspect a bird of prey like a goshawk. Here is a picture of a female capercaillie, the tail feathers match up. See Western capercaillie. the bird is found across Eurasia, and definitely in Sweden.


12

It's much easier to know what's not protected than to try to know what is protected. In most of the United States there are only a handful of birds you can legally hunt, and only during "season". This is a general guideline, that can help you narrow it down and not waste time, but this does not replace picking up a DNR guide for your area. The easiest ...


12

This usually means that they had a nest in the tree. If they are still there after a few days it probably means they also had young. Either still in the nest or young enough that they still returned to be fed.


12

Before we did the following we had barely any birds in the garden... We put up one of those stick in the ground multiple feeders which has three hooks with three different feeders on, a table/bowl and a water bowl . So what you've added to the garden should be plenty. The issue here maybe what food you use - what you feed when is important, however your ...


12

There are several ways to give birds a drink. if it is calm just dip the beak in water and let it drink naturally. Your method of dropping water of cotton wool is fine. Dropper, syringe or drop-wise from a teaspoon is fine. Just a drop or two at a time. Don't force water into the bird, just allow a drop at a time to fall into the beak, let it swallow. It ...


12

The osprey does seem the most likely option. There are only a handful of breeding pairs in North Wales, but they are in your area so it's credible. The wingspan of a small common buzzard starts at around 110cm and a large osprey can reach 170cm, so although they are normally of similar size the wingspan differential is possible. And the osprey has the white ...


12

No, gulls (of some species at least) steal food from other birds by moving them until they drop it. They must then be adept at snatching the falling food in mid air. There's material of interest in the Wikipedia article on seabirds - search for kleptoparasitism, reference 23 looks particularly interesting. The article on mobbing also hints in this ...


12

it's not cold for a goose, as they bring their insulating down-filled sleeping gear with them. ponds/lakes are safer for them than a field where predators are more common. Typically in a flock, not all birds will sleep....some are awake & watching. note that in the event the ice breaks due to warmer weather and/or wind, a goose will float serenely and ...


12

Paul Lydon could be right. The behavior is designed to encourage worms to come to the surface, to make it easier for the geese to find and eat. From the same Wikipedia page he quoted, entitled Worm Charming: Worm charming is a behavior also observed in the animal kingdom, especially among birds. The methods used vary; however, tapping earth with feet to ...


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