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11

First of all don't scratch. blood sucking insects inject anti-coagulant under your skin to prevent your blood from clotting and forming a scab so they don't get their mouthes stuck inside you while sucking. If you scratch, you only manage to spread the anti-coagulant around under your skin, which intensifies the itch and makes things worse. Train your brain ...


11

You can't. All you can do is throughly inspect yourself or have someone check you over to see if they can find any. But there's nothing you can do to ensure there aren't anymore around, you can only hope that you've found them all on your person. When I first got married, my wife and I went for a hike along the river close to my home. We hung out on the ...


10

Sauna. And not that joke-of-a-sauna but a real Scandinavian sauna with 80°C / 176°F. One thing with ticks is that they can take an enormous amount of beating and other forms of killing attempts but they're extremely vulnerable to heat. Same thing with deer flies. You can also try with a hot shower but you really have to gradually crank up the heat as much ...


10

Your bite/sting mark is missing something very essential in order to qualify it as a bite or sting mark, and that is: a mark from a bite or a sting. Had something bit you or stung you, then you would be able to see a little hole or pincer mark in the middle of that very colourful bruise you have. Coincidence of all coincidences, I lived in Miamisburg for a ...


10

I've taken the liberty to bold 2 questions I believed where the main questions of your post. Are there animals that are simply not afraid of much bigger humans? Yes. A variety of animals have adapted to our societies/cities and have adapted, other species may have no other choice than to look for food near or in our ever expanding cities and towns. May it ...


6

Plantago works excellent againt nettle because of its anti-histamin properties and, in my experience, also against musquito bites. It grows usually in the neighbourhoud of nettle and might be the only plants that survices on a pathway. You need to crush the leaves and apply it on the 'wound'. (it's like pressing water out of a stone, but it can be done).


6

The only thing I can recommend from experience is mud: Cover the itching area with plenty of it and the itching will go away. After the mud dried out and has fallen off, sometimes the bites start to itch again, just reapply. But in most cases I never had to do that again. Generally cold helps by dulling the itching. The opposite, heat, will temporarily ...


4

In addition to ShemSegers and Jani-Hyytiäinens answer, I'd like to add that because of their ability of survival just throwing them into the bin might indeed enable them to creep out again (depends on the bin). To make sure, you could kill them with fire. Hold them with tweezers and kill them with a lighter.


3

If you expect itchy insect bites, I can recommend a dedicated heat stick for treating the bites. Something like this: Therapik Mosquito Bite Reliever It does work, at least temporarily. The mechanism is often said to be the denaturing of the proteins due to heat. However the heat is not sufficient for that. What apparently really happens is that the local ...


3

I remember buying in pharmacies a liquid prepared on the spot, from mint powder and saline solution (unfortunately this mix is sort of local-specific to our Romanian pharmacies, so I cannot provide a link). This was applied on mosquito bites and allergy rash - it stopped the itching for an hour or two. Based on this experience: try some sort of minty cream (...


1

The cause of the itch can be quite different. For mosquito bites, the itch is due to a allergic reaction to the mosquito's saliva. The strength of this allergic reaction varies between people, and it is possible, usually after enough exposure, to develop immunity. That means your body no longer over-reacts to the mosquito spittal. Tick bites usually itch ...


1

From what I remember, some biting insects deliver an anticoagulant . This may irritate, though it's not well studied. Others rely on not being detected, and deliver an anaesthetic. One effect that can affect how much a particular bite irritates, even for the same species, is if you knock it off leaving mouthparts behind. Of course different parts of your ...


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