22

It depends in part on how you got the blisters, but from the question I think we can take it to mean that they're from friction. In order of what you can expect They will get worse and larger. They will pop. The friction that you haven't dealt with will continue. It is now rubbing on much softer skin. It will literally rub away skin (I've had this ...


22

The risk is that the blisters will get worse and worse, and continue to interfere with your hiking experience. They can get larger, more painful, and eventually tear open and risk getting infected. This process can happen fairly quickly - from the first time you notice pain in your feet, blisters can develop in < 15 minutes. I haven't personally tried ...


21

There's a lot of dubious assertions in the answers here, and frankly some bad advice regarding how long to wait before treating a blister. We just had a lecture on blister management in my WFR class yesterday, so I'll give this a go. The answer to "should I deflate this blister" comes down to a very simple question: Will it pop itself if I don't? Any ...


15

Blisters are caused by friction. Your skin is not very slippery. Applying moleskin and duct-tape over a "hot-spot" adds a protective layer between your skin and shoe. Thus as your shoe slides, it rubs against the tape or mole-skin instead of your skin. Pointers: Use enough tape/mole-skin to cover an area larger than the hot-spot. If the hotspot is on the ...


12

Kayak guide here... Blisters form because of friction, as many know. What most don't realize is that it matters little if your hands are wet or dry. Because you are gripping the paddle tightly, your hands will rub against the paddle plastic. Depending on how you are holding it, you want to minimize the "sliding", try to keep your hands on the same place ...


10

I will share what I know about Blisters and what I could do to suffer least from them. Blisters are mainly due to wetness, let it be through Actual wet shoes and socks, or let them be due to Sweat. These are the few things that I follow and since I have started doing those things, I have managed to make the suffering too far less frequent, even if I trek for ...


9

Maybe? It may depend on where you're getting the blisters. A lot of the blisters that I get from hiking boots are on my heels, or on the sides of my toes. I don't think that barefoot walking would help build calluses in those places. If you want to walk barefoot, go ahead an experiment with that. But I'd also look at the general advice for avoid ...


8

Most insoles are either sized to fit, or cut to fit in your shoes, if your insoles don't fit right then you should probably buy new ones. But first I would question whether or not your new boots are the proper fit. If your insoles are slipping, chances are that you have more room in your shoes than you need, and your foot might slide around with or without ...


8

So, like I said, I'm not a great expert on using duct tape and moleskin. I'm writing an answer because someone specifically asked. :) My experiences: First off - applying duct tape or moleskin to your feet is a skill you develop through trial and error. Make sure that you learn to do it BEFORE going on a major expedition. Whenever I have a big hiking ...


8

Blisters are more frequent between the toes than Anywhere on the bottom of the feet. And, with heavy trekking shoes, you are most likely to sustain blisters around toes and between them, so I guess as the above guy (theJollySin) said walking barefoot wont help much with blisters, But yeah it does help you to Harden your skin, make your ankle recover from any ...


8

Stop PAMPERING Your Feet if you Want Them TOUGHER! Not sure what you mean by "liner socks", but one of the worst footwear mistakes a hiker can make is wearing TWO pairs of socks. I would sincerely advise against two pairs of socks, if that is what was advised above. Most seasoned distance hikers and runners would tell you that, or ask yourself after doing a ...


7

I haven't tried @Vorac answer, but it sounds interesting. I'm not going to say if popping a blister is correct or not. But, if you do, this is how I was taught to pop a blister: Get a needle (sterile of course) About 1/3 of an inch from the blister, insert the needle under the skin towards the blister. When it reaches the blister, remove the needle. There ...


6

I've always used Compeed blister plasters to treat a blister. It's like covering the blister with a second, more durable skin. You are supposed to leave the plaster on until it falls off naturally which, for me, is usually three or four days. They are a little expensive but your feet will thank you for them. By the way, I am not affiliated with Compeed ...


5

In such cases I try to tie my shoelaces differently, to change the way my foot sits in the shoe - if my ankle is too loose (thus the blisters), I would try to change that in case I cannot get any help. This is not a long term solution, especially if you tie your shoelaces too tight they may affect the blood circulation in your foot a bit.


5

On the topic of popping blisters. There are the two contradicting opinions out there, of course. My understanding is as follows. Do not pop a blister if you can avoid it. If walking significant distance is needed, pop it with a clean needle, squeeze out the liquid, and put an antibiotical bandage over it. The gains are twofold: The blister won't pop in ...


5

This is actually very simple. You use them as both a cushioning material and a way to prevent your shoe rubbing on your skin. If you have a problem area, products such as Compeed cushions, mole skin etc work really well, but in an emergency duct tape should work just fine. Just stick them over the area, making sure the edges don't catch on anything in ...


5

Zinc oxide has a very slight antimicrobial effect, whilst having little to no impact on human cells. This is more that the material is toxic to microbes than activating a body defence. It's the Zn^{2+} ions that have the property of being toxic to microbes. Small particles are more effective. Ideally I'd recommend creams to provide an even distribution of ...


4

The other answers are good, but here's my personal experience, as well as some of the common advice I didn't see. Cause - The two causes of blisters while hiking are moisture and friction. This means you want to keep your feet dry and not sliding around, which is where proper boots comes in, as mentioned above. Proactive - You should treat blisters early. ...


4

Prevention is easy, wear your pack on your hips where it's supposed to be, and never let anything rub. Friction is bad, all hot spots need to be taken care of long before they are allowed to develop into a blister. Treatment for such blisters may involve draining them so they don't cause pain from pressure, and then wrapping them with a thick bandage. Use ...


4

Foot health and blister prevention is a large subject - you can literally write a book about it. My understanding was greatly increased by John Vonhof's Fixing Your Feet, which is regarded as the classic in the field. John is a faspacker and ultramarathoner who developed his skills treating thousands of endurance athletes during ultra events. He swaps ideas ...


3

I suppose for recreational paddling you could use gloves, but they come at a cost of decreased grip, which translates to less power in stroke and fatigue in hands. The best way to prevent blisters is to toughen up your hands. I have done 1000+km trips without gloves. The only time I use gloves is for cold. Perhaps work on your stroke too, when paddling your ...


3

I wear lightweight gardening gloves, cotton I suppose, available in men's, women's, and children's sizes for $3 or so at pretty much any hardware or gardening store in the summer. I avoid anything with leather or rubber, I want pretty much just fabric. Gently elasticized wrists are fine. Example 1. Example 2: These protect against blisters, keep your ...


3

It might act like a pressure sore. From what I understand, the whole reason why pressure sores normally only affect physically disabled people is that anyone else would stop putting pressure on that one spot. An untreated pressure sore will result in gradual breakdown of the layers of the skin, until you have a big nasty open wound that gets infected really ...


3

Soak feet in salt water. It dries out bottom of feet so blisters don't occur


3

Having various long hiking experience I find the following seems to help reduce blistering: Toe socks .. big help. Stopping and changing socks OFTEN or as soon as tehre is any burn feeling. This is the biggest thing. As soon as you sense friction STOP and deal with it. Let feet cool and dry and change socks at least. Use Band Aid blister pads. ...


3

I've read about using rubbing alcohol to harden them up, but never done it. I usually wear silk or poly socks inside the self-wicking hydrophilic/hydrophibic layered socks. When I get a blister, I lance, drain, debride it, and then put a protective layer of superglue over it. It works.


3

I've personally used it to prevent blisters (and also tried going without it for comparison). In my experience it works wonders. I am quite prone to blisters when going without, but by going a day without and then taping up the areas that feel sore I have been able to completely prevent blisters on multiple week-long trips. There might be some pain in ...


3

As someone who thru-hiked the AT, and has had many a blister, I can safely say that you really need do nothing for them other than to remove the dead skin once the blister pops, off load any pressure being placed upon them if possible and keep it as clean and dry as possible. Unless you are diabetic, immunocompromised or a heavy smoker, they will heal in ...


2

A blister can be drained with just a small pinprick using a sterilized device. However, do not remove the overlying skin. As it remains natures best Band-Aid to cover the wound. One exception would be is if develops red streaks and the pus has a foul odor. In that case you might require antibiotic ointment and medication.ALSO,KEEP IT DRY AS POSSIBLE!.This ...


2

Surgical spirit works every time. Rub it in using cotton wool for a month before you hit the trail. The best blister prevention is to walk, walk and walk.


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