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15

I have come across wild boars about a dozen times (I admit, not that much), in numbers from a single male, mothers with young upto groups of 30-40 and I've never felt threatened. Sometimes the leading (fe)male might approach you aggressively just long enough for the rest of the group to run away and then retreat too. I usually stay silent and try to observe ...


13

Possible threats First of all we should consider what threats may apply: Potential Threats to Hikers from Wild Pigs wild boar with sharp tusks Feral pigs can exhibit aggressive territorial behaviors. Hogs may weigh up to 300 pounds or more, can charge at least 11 mph and can quickly attack hikers. Boars have four extremely sharp tusks up to five ...


9

The most useful thing you can do with an axe in case of a boar attack is throwing it into the bushes and climbing the nearest tree. Trying to melee with a charging boar is a bad ideaTM, regardless of what kind of weapon you are carrying. This mostly includes guns also, as a charge by a boar will not give you enough time to do much of any thing before ...


8

I bike to work here in Japan and sometimes I have to bike back late in the evening (coz of overtime). I live in a mountainous forrested area and there are many boar around (because there's few hunters here). In the past 5 years, boar have crossed my path about 6-7 times (always when it's dark) and they ran at really high speed (there is no way to even ...


7

I have never heard of wild boars charging a tent. I really don't imagine that happening, assuming there isn't a human visibly standing in the doorway or something. Wild boars predominantly charge to protect their young. A person walking around near them could be seen as a threat, but not a fixed object like a tent. They don't charge trees and large ...


6

As a general rule wild boars would not charge a tent. They usually only charge when they feel threatened. Like many other wild animals, wild boars will only attack if they are cornered or if they feel threatened. Female wild boars are very protective of their young and can easily be provoked. Wild boars are strong animals that can run relatively fast. The ...


6

It happens fairly often, and usually the purpose is to reintroduce the animals to places where they used to be but were wiped out. This is know as species reintroduction/restablishment. Species reintroduction is the deliberate release of a species into the wild, from captivity or other areas where the organism is capable of survival. The goal of species ...


6

Three blade broadheads will leave a wider wound channel and thus a better chance for a kill as bow kills are usually blood loss. It can be argued that two blade gets better penetration but, in my opinion, that is just a factor of putting your shot in the right place. Failure to hit the target isn't an arrow problem. (Edit: Okay yes, failure to hit could ...


5

As others point out, avoiding them is key, and because they're so aggressive it's generally the better stance to take. That said, if you find yourself unavoidably coming up against one then being aggressive can work (though of course this isn't guaranteed.) Often if you attack one and the rest see that you're capable of that, then they'll run away (as seen ...


4

Here is what I've learned from living and vacationing in Hawaii on several of the islands. Looking through the Hawaiian Yellow Pages, it seems that there are several different local food processing places that would process a wild boar for you. As far as locals helping you out either with hunting or processing, I'd recommend not interfacing with them ...


4

Short answer: there's a lot of public land, most likely state owned (not federal), that's available for hunting. (source: state.tx.us) 1 There might be limitations for nonresidents and/or based on what you plan to hunt with (e.g. firearm, black powder, bow) but this looks like a great starting point for information: Public Hunting and Access to TPWD ...


4

I camp very often in a country park campground where boars come almost everyday, starting from sunset. I've also seen boars bite tents many times, if there are no people inside. However, I've never seen a boar charge a tent if there are people inside. I think the food inside the tents is the main reason. I personally saw a case that supports this. This was ...


4

As long as you are permitted to do the camping I would not worry too much for the boars. However, make sure that you have a wild animal to worry about more: Homo sapiens. However, when selecting your camp site make sure that it is free of boar or other wild animal traces. Avoid places where you recognize: dug up soil animal tracks and paths (boar) hair (...


3

It's not that it would be too big of a cartridge, it's just that it's an old cartridge (introduced in 1906) that's no longer what the Cool Kids™ use. 308, for example, is lighter, cheaper, more accurate and while 308 will drop more that really doesn't matter except for really long range shots and then you would have the 6.5 Creedmore which is more ...


3

It all depends on where you are hiking (you may want to edit that into your question) as to the type of wild boar one may encounter. I have backpacked extensively around the Southwestern U.S. and I've come across as many as 7-10 javelina and they are of little threat to hikers. I had edited that I had never heard of a single attack but then found a snip-...


3

do I stand a chance to pretend to be aggressive if they out-number me? Few of the civilians suggested that it works most of the times if they out-number you. They loose their formation and run away. This sounds like complete nonsense - boars do not have a "formation". They are not predators and will not pursue you (the case where "pretending to be ...


2

First of all wild boars have a bad sight, they just smell well and hear. Though personally I would say that to minor noise they don't react much. Therefore there is a need of decent noise if you do not want to meet them. Once you met - do not show aggression ever. Stay calm and walk noisily away. Or just start making noise. But don't go towards. Even if ...


2

I have a friend who's lived with a guy that had a wild boar in a cage in his backyard. When my friend went into the cage to feed it, she was attacked. She was able to get out of the cage but the boar also did and one of it's tusks hit her upper calf. Luckily it didn't hit any arteries and she only has a scar. Worse was also avoided by her climbing on top of ...


2

I have slept 4 nights recently (July) in the Czech Republic and Poland with boars nearby. I make it a habit to urinate on the trees around my campsite to let animals, particularly wild dogs, know it is my territory. The first night, a boar came sniffing quite close, about 2 meters away. I shouted. On the third shout, it went away. The next night, I placed a ...


2

RE: Fending off a Boar with an Axe. Sure, you could do that. BUT... chances are high that you will likely not incapacitate the Boar enough immediately since you may not penetrate deep enough with the blow to deliver an immediately incapacitating blow. NOTE: An aggressive Boar will use their tusks and attempt to gore you in the area of your femoral artery (...


1

I'd be careful of wild pigs (boar or sow doesn't matter that much) when moving rather than when camping/sleeping: the danger is if you meet them and they are cornered. But unless you like to enter swamps and very thick brambles, and pick the blackberries only from the outside of the bramble thicket you're unlikely to stumble into their "living room", and you ...


1

Not going to distract with an axe and then climb a tree. You got to the tree or not before the hog got to you. Hogs are usually in brush without a lot of trees you can climb. An axe is a formidable weapon. You would need to time the charge but you can break flesh. If it does latch on to you then strike the hind quarters. I would certainly want more ...


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