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17

It might sound a bit odd and not-so-related to the question, but have you considered carrying a Kindle? I got used to carry mine along, wherever I go (bagpacking included). Advantages it doesn't get bent corners and broken spine; if you pack it in a good place, it doesn't break at all a fully charged battery lasts several weeks it is quite lightweight can ...


16

It's a round trip. Getting to the summit is optional, getting down is mandatory. - Ed Viesturs and of course, It is not the mountain we conquer, but ourselves - Sir Edmund Hillary


16

I'm not sure if there is something you know about temperature's affect on books that I do not? I would not have thought temperature would be a problem. That aside, I think the ziplock solution is pretty good. It obviously doesn't provide any rigid support, but if you aren't concerned about that, there are a myriad of dry bags / pouches, map cases & ...


13

Check out the SAS Survival Handbook. It's clear, concise, to the point, and contains a lot of good survival information.


11

"I wanted to achieve something essential in life, something that is not measured by money or position in society... The mountains are not stadiums where I satisfy my ambitions to achieve. They are my cathedrals, the houses of my religion... In the mountains I attempt to understand my life. They are the way I practice my religion. In the ...


9

Cody Lundin's 98.6 Degrees: The Art of Keeping Your Ass Alive! is a good introduction. It deals more with the psychological and physiological issues of survival than specific techniques.


9

My absolute favorite: “There are other Annapurnas in the lives of men" --Maurice Herzog


9

In my opinion, there is only one! When asked “Why did you want to climb Mount Everest?” George Mallory replied: Because it's there... Or more fully: Because it's there... Everest is the highest mountain in the world, and no man has reached its summit. Its existence is a challenge. The answer is instinctive, a part, I suppose, of man's desire to ...


9

Notwithstanding Mallory's classic, there is Sir Edmund Hillary's response when it was suggested Mallory may have reached the summit: I’m rather inclined to think, personally, that maybe it’s quite important, the getting down. Or more fully: If you climb a mountain for the first time and die on the descent, is it really a complete first ascent of ...


8

This book, How to stay alive in the Woods, is an older book but contains lots of valuable information on how to keep from getting hungry, and other useful things, while away from civilization.


8

My two favorite John Muir quotes: One day’s exposure to mountains is better than a cartload of books. and I never saw a discontented tree.


8

Both are from Wolfgang Güllich - he is known for climbing first 8b (5.13d), 8b+ (5.14a), 8c (5.14b) and 9a (5.14d). By the way, he is the inventor of the Campus Board: If climbing is an art, then creativity is its main component. And A man doesn't go to drink coffee after climbing, coffee is integral part of the climbing. Wolfgang Güllich


7

Mt. Whymper in Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, was first ascended by a party led by Edward Whymper in 1901. He also got first ascent at the beautiful Stanley Peak, which is named after the same Stanley as the Stanley Cup, and located just across the highway from Mt. Whymper.


6

"Great things are done when Men & Mountains meet. This is not Done by Jostling in the Street." - William Blake, "Great Things Are Done" (c. 1807-1809), line 1. "A few hours' mountain climbing make of a rogue and a saint two fairly equal creatures. Tiredness is the shortest path to equality and fraternity — and sleep finally adds to them liberty." - ...


6

There are several equivalents just as there is for the AT. I would consider Halfmile maps combined with PocketPCT. Halfmile's PCT maps 'Erik the Black' books PCT Data Book Pocket PCT (No longer available at this link as of March 2018) U.S. Forest Service PCT Yogi's (No longer available as of March of 2018) Wilderness Press books / databook ('official') ...


6

As chd mentioned 98.6 Degrees is an excellent book. It is mainly focused on practical things you can do to survive and like chd on the physiological aspect of it. If you are looking to read about the psychology of survival and the mental attitude that promotes it I highly recommend Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why. And of course, as always ...


6

The repetition of the really great alpine routes seemed to us much more interesting than discovering obscure little climbs in remote corners. Like ugly girls, many of the ridges and faces which preserved their virginity until comparatively recently did so more from lack of attraction than from intrinsic difficulty. Lionel Terray in "Conquistadors of the ...


6

The Textbook/Bible of Mountaineering: The standard book is Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills. That book covers all of the basics for rock climbing and a lot more topics. From the chapter titles of the eighth edition, it covers a lot of topics and I have highlighted the relevant chapters. Chapters: First Steps Clothing and Equipment ...


5

I really liked this book, mainly because it's on real experiment, but it's in French: Le Surviethon: Vingt-cinq ans plus tard: Récit du Surviethon • Analyse critique • Techniques de survie (French) Paperback It's base on two person who decided to test their ability to survive for 30 days with almost nothing.


5

"The mountains are calling and I must go." -- John Muir, the naturalist who had in great influence on the preservation of e.g. Yosemite and Sequoia National Park The quote may be rather commonly used, but I still like it very much. It can, for example, be found on a large sign at the city limits of the town of Mammoth Lakes.


5

Another guide book option for you might be the BMC sport climbing guide. http://www.bmcshop.co.uk/product_info.php?products_id=5299


4

Maybe the ROCKFAX? http://www.rockfax.com/climbing-guides/books/northern-england-2008/ By the way, this is a great site for finding info on crags in a given area: http://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/map/ - once you find a crag it also lists relevant guidebooks.


4

Ernest Thompson Seton's book, like Rolf in the Woods or Two Little Savages are inspiration for backwoodmanship, especially for young people.


4

Backpacking Trail Life by Ray Jardine Ray is one of the pioneers of ultralight backpacking, if not the pioneer, not to mention expert kayaker and freeclimber. This book changed how I see backpacking from the Boy Scout/Army way to a better way. Ray's guidance made backpacking fun for me. Non-Factual The Road More or Less Traveled Okay, here's one that's ...


4

Backcountry first aid and medicine Wilderness Medicine This book covers it all. Do you need to know about that snake that bit you? Look in here. Did someone fall and break their ankle? This has you covered. Do you have rampant diarrhea? How dangerous is that rash? Will eating snow fix your dehydration? This book will have you covered if you're a dirt bag, ...


4

Climbing: Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills Canoeing: Backpacking: Backcountry cooking: NOLS Cookery Bike touring: Telemark Skiing: Allen & Mike's Really Cool Telemark Book


4

I like Les Stroud's(survivorman) book called "Survive!". Just like in his tv show, he outlines survival in all different climates and locales. It's very specific and sounds like something that would interest you. There's a great(and short) list of survival books here. Another of my favorites is "Wildwood Wisdom" which isn't locale specific but focuses on ...


4

“Climb if you will, but remember that courage and strength are nought without prudence, and that a momentary negligence may destroy the happiness of a lifetime. Do nothing in haste; look well to each step; and from the beginning think what may be the end.” -- Edward Whymper, in Scrambles Amongst the Alps.


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