31

I think the main reason for this is that the hunting styles are a lot different between the two. Archery hunters often don't wear orange and get very close to the their prey while gun hunters wear orange and are able to hunt at ranges of hundreds of yards. Combining those activities at the same time increase the risk of archery hunters being shot by gun ...


20

Compare a human skull to that of a deer. The human skull is dominated by the brain, so a shot to the head is likely to penetrate the cranium and brain. On the other hand, a deer brain is very small compared to the skull and presents a very small target. Furthermore there are bony stuctures which might deflect away a bullet or arrow. See this picture of a ...


18

The head tends to be a harder target to hit than the vital organs in the center of the body, but a penetrating hit there is more likely to take a human or animal to unconsciousness and inability immediately. That's more important to do to a human who may have a weapon that can hit you back quickly, than it is to a nearly-defenseless animal you are hunting ...


12

To answer this I need to split up your question a little bit. I'd like to know which kind of arrow would slow down or kill a bear Every arrow with a broad-head (= hunting point) attached. It doesn't matter whether it's made out of wood, aluminium or carbon, if the arrow fits you and your bow. Which vital spots should I aim at The lethal zone which is in ...


12

Your question was about deer hunting in Pennsylvania and Oregon where the majority of the deer are whitetail deer and mule deer, respectively. My answer applies to both, generally. There are many other species of deer, and I am not referring to them here. Also, the answer to your question is very complicated. I'll try to keep it short. Before a game ...


11

It will not matter which way the fletching runs on arrows for left or right handed archers, however right handed fletching tools will be harder for a left hander to use, as you would need to change the angle of your hand. Any angling of the fletching will produce spin on the arrow, however this is not going to affect the shot of a right or left hander, for ...


9

For two (percieved or real) reasons, I believe: A greater risk of wounding the animal. (Even a skilled hunter misses from time to time and a hunter with a rifle has a bigger chance of getting off a second, killing shot) Poaching. You are generally not permitted to use a silencer on a hunting rifle for the same reason. Plus the fact that "regular" hunters ...


9

One shooting the other basically. It's a safety measure. Where I live we don't have hunting season. We hunt the whole year round. I'm a bow-hunter and I've encounter myself looking up the barrel of a rifle twice.


7

Chances are you'll be doing a lot more tracking. Blunt tips are for very small game, intended to knock they prey out cold or cause death by blunt trauma. Hunting tips are intended to increase depth of penetration as well as doing continuous damage to the vital organs once full penetration has occurred. Hunting tips will almost always penetrate deeper than ...


7

It does apply, in some cases - it's actually a preference. For small game such as rabbits a neat little shot to the head with a high powered air rifle will kill the rabbit and save you from having to get the shot out afterwards. This is also most likely with small game that it's going to be much harder to pick out heart or lungs to aim to, the head is a ...


7

What I have found here on page 2 is that you are allowed to hunt with gun permit + up-to-date "hunting ticket", or with foreign hunting permit. On page 1 there is reference to a law saying that you may strike with your hunting gun or hunting bow if you clearly identified the game and the strike would not endanger the life of someone. The two may cover the ...


7

Hunting serves several purposes, a few of which are to: Allow residents (who own public game animals) to harvest meat; Follow long-held traditions; Manage game populations The two most common types of tools used in hunting are firearms and bows. Hunters who just want to harvest meat often don't care which tool they use - to them, "One kill is one kill". ...


7

This answer is based on research and my experience hiking in the United States, specifically the Midwest and Northeastern US. I mostly focus on deer season, because that's the big one in this area. Be sure to find out which hunting seasons are most popular in your area, and look up the specific dates. Blaze orange and ANSI orange are very similar. In fact, ...


6

This question arises basically for one reason. Movies are wrong. Any cop or soldier (even snipers) are trained to shoot center of mass. This is because it's far easier to hit, and still highly lethal. The head is a relatively fast moving, and smaller target. The skull also provides much more armour than the ribcage. As well demonstrated by @mikeagg the ...


6

A headshot is a high percentage HIT if done perfectly, but it is not a high percentage SHOT to do perfectly. The brain (which is the actual intended target) is a small target, a miss of the exact target leads to a very ineffective alternate hit, it moves more, and it is more armored (which on glancing shots can increase the chance of ricochet, this is ...


6

Three blade broadheads will leave a wider wound channel and thus a better chance for a kill as bow kills are usually blood loss. It can be argued that two blade gets better penetration but, in my opinion, that is just a factor of putting your shot in the right place. Failure to hit the target isn't an arrow problem. (Edit: Okay yes, failure to hit could ...


6

It looks to me, looking at the diagram on this site, that ATA is a measure of the bow itself. I would say that the limbs of the bow are relaxed in this diagram. I hope this article will also be helpful to you. And here is the article: Understanding compound bows, and how to select them.


6

Yes - 50lbs draw means you need to be able to pull 50lbs, unless you have a pulley/gear reduction. So if you increase to a higher draw, you'll need to be able to pull it.


6

I don't know how much push-ups will help, since they're working the muscles in a different direction. I started indoor rock-climbing this year at a place with some pretty healthy overhangs, and those work the back muscles in pretty much the same way as drawing my bow. It feels to me like it's made quite a difference. Also, what's your draw weight and what ...


6

If your reason for not wanting camo is that you want to be obvious (maybe to other hunters so you don't get shot) then you can always flash a backpack with reflective material, or use a hi vis pack cover such as those recommended for cyclists. Home-modding a rucksack to incorporate the barrel ties and stock pocket probably wouldn't take you too long if you ...


5

If you have to pull it back manually without a mechanism then you will need the strength to pull it back. Also consider when putting a new draw on it, that the body can hold the increased vibration and tension without shattering. I would suggest going for a new crossbow if you want increased poundage, or get a professional to change it for you. As a side ...


5

From my archery days, you're primarily looking at upper arm and shoulder. Push-ups can help with that, but are pretty hard on your joints. Shoulders: http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/rehabilitation-exercises/free-weights-exercises/single-arm-row Triceps: http://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/rehabilitation-exercises/free-weights-exercises/jawbreaker ...


5

I find bows are more challenging. Plus, in Ohio for whitetail deer, the archery season last from end the of September through February. The gun season lasts only a week and then an extra weekend. So comparatively, there is a lot more time you can spend in the woods if you're an archer. For the pricing bit of archery vs guns. Well, my bow (Matthews Z2) ...


5

Other than the stated back to nature (if you can count it as that as most hunters use compounds) it is generally considered both quiter and cheaper. It is a lot cheaper to buy a bow and arrows than a silenced rifle. Especially as, if you are lucky, you can reuse arrows. It is down to preference however, as to what a person wishes to use.


5

The outcome in the use of the set up you speak of, will also greatly depend on the size of the game you are considering hunting. On small game a field tip will penetrate, and in most instances, pin the game to the ground unless shooting at extreme angles. While this would work to harvest a smaller animal, I would definitely not recommend it on any size game. ...


5

No offence, but if your bow is properly tuned you'll literally feel no difference from field tips to broadheads :) Broadheads intensify any tuning issues. That's why you may experience a supposedly well-tuned field tip and a bad flying broadhead. On a properly tuned bow, a Wasp Broadhead will hit the same marks as your field points. (...) ...


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