25

The bowline knot is very safe if loaded correctly. This is the usual, safe way to load it: The chair foot is the body (sorry for not offering naked models), the part of the rope leading away from the picture will take the load. In this use case the knot should hold perfectly. On the other hand, you might get the idea to use the bowline knot to create a ...


15

In the context of rock climbing, compared to a figure-8 knot, bowlines are: About as strong under ideal circumstances BUT: Can come untied on their own when unloaded Are more difficult to visually inspect (important, because climbers frequently rely on partners to check their knots, and may be tying and untying knots when they're tired and / or distracted)...


12

In addition to zoul's excellent answer, the Bowline has another drawback in that it can come loose (or even undone) after repeated load/unload cycles (i.e. weighing and unweighing the rope). This means that the bowline is not as good as the figure-8 to use to tie-in a climber, especially for multi-pitch climbing, gym climbing, etc... (That said, many good ...


12

The three knots you listed are all quite suitable for tying in to a sit harness for rock climbing. The figure eight is the most widely used and most readily and easily inspected, and is not a bad choice for tying in: ...When tying into the rope there’s a reason the figure eight knot has been the knot of choice for years. Strong, simple, easy to untie and ...


9

You just needed to look a little farther on the PACI site for a step by step instuction on how to do the EBSB. Check out this pdf on page 22.


8

None of the photos show the bowline with the loose end tied off. In this (untied off) form the knot is unsafe as there is a strong chance of slippage. It's also easy to tie badly with fatal consequences. On the plus side its possible to tie one single handed in about 4 seconds. When tied off with a single or better double hitch though then this knot is ...


7

We here at the Rigstar Training and Testing Center do a lot of break tests. Having the tail of the bowline to the inside or outside does not matter for strength or efficiency of the knot. The reaction is the same. Here is the scientific reason why it's the same strength or have the same average breaking strength. The bights on the bowline cause compression ...


7

I have been climbing on a yosemite bowline for a long time, and never had any problems. I don't see it as any harder to check than a figure 8 once you are used to it. It's easy to tie, secure, faster than the figure 8, requires less rope, and never gets difficult to untie after falls. It's a great knot, and there seems to be a lot of superstitious aversion ...


5

In Hebrew, the bowline knot is translated as a rescue knot, so I assume the reason it is used is the fact that the chances of it untying unintentionally is low. When having the knot end on the inside, the end of the knot needs to move despite the added friction from the object or person the end of the knot is against. When using the end on the outside, it ...


5

Here are four variations on the bowline, in words and graphics. Note that all four of them are here left not fully dressed (not tightened). In each case, the standing part should be pulled, or at least held firm, to tighten the knot. If, instead, you pull on the working end without holding the standing part -- and this seems to be your problem -- the knot ...


4

The bowline is an interesting example of a knot which fails if dressed wrongly - even if it has been tied correctly. If you tighten a bowline by pulling on the working end, or by pulling the loop apart, it can invert to a running noose. Tighten it by pulling the standing end to avoid this. Here is a loose bowline: Pulling the working end (and the right-hand ...


3

The F8 is an inherently secure eye knot. Not all knots are inherently secure - but the F8 is, and hence one of the reasons for its enduring popularity for use in life critical applications. The simple Bowline (#1010) has been known and used for hundreds of years by sailors - and it was 'invented' for this purpose (ie in sailing applications). The simple (#...


3

From my personal experience, people either use a double bowline (*) or a double figure 8. The bowline (in my experience!) is used only by fairly experienced climbers, probably because it is more difficult to execute. I will list some pros/cons of the two knots; remind anyway that both knots are absolutely safe to use (as I'm sure is the Yosemite bowline, ...


2

In the first instance, the simple #1010 Bowline (as shown by the OP) - is not and never was intended for climbing. Its sort of like asking; "Is a Lamborghini sports car suitable to drive off road in very rough terrain?" Clearly, the answer is "No". The simple #1010 Bowline was 'invented' hundreds of years ago for nautical (sailing) purposes. It was not ...


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