Hot answers tagged

11

There are two important factors when bowmaking: Flexibiliy, i.e. how easy the wood is to bend Strength, i.e. how much force you can put into the wood before it breaks. If you are just interested in a toy bow that doesn't shoot to hard or far then flexibility is your main concern. You want thinnish green wood which tends to be the most flexible. If you ...


10

I know that bow length needs to match the draw length mostly because you lose precision if overdrawing it as soon as the string stop touching the limbs and just hold on the tips, string can swing sideways and affect arrow travel. Holy... - no! Just no! No, no, no, no, no :) There are even 44" (38" string) which are able to shoot accurate 'till 32" ...


9

If you're simply looking for a bag to transport your bow in, then go shopping for a compound bow bag. There is a large selection of bags available. If you're specifically looking to invest in a backpack that you can strap your bow too, then you can look for a compatible bow cover to conceal your bow. If you just want to get to the range without getting ...


9

Back when I learned to build my own bows a guy in the club I belonged to used just a ledge and a baggie of lead weights (tire balancing stuff). I suppose you could reproduce it "in the wild" hanging from a branch and a bag of stones. However that guy was an expert that forgot more than I'll ever know about bow building and didn't need to fiddle much with it ...


9

(First of all: I'm not used to the english words here.) I think tillering trees refere to the contraptiosn you do mount on walls / something standing upright, using a string and a pulley. But you can easily do the same with just a tillering stick which is quite easy to fabricate, I think following images say more than I can say in words. All you need is a ...


9

You can string a recurve by bracing it on your foot. For casual shooting it is okay but I would advise against it. While it can twist the limbs, the actual issue is the uneven stress on the screws / bolts that hold the limbs in place. Believe me, you don't want one of them slipping mid draw. I would suggest getting a stringer. They save a lot of time and ...


8

As far as I know, the only time you need to unstring your compound bow is when you're replacing the string, or doing some other repair. If you have an older compound bow that's made from laminated wood, then you'll want to back off the tension on your string when you store it, but modern compound bows have limbs that are rated up to 200,000psi, and can be ...


8

It seems that your question is about efficacy of the method. I'm not a bow fishermen, but I know that some plankton feeders, such as the asian carp and the silver carp will not easily take a lure or a fly. In fact, carp is one of the most challenging fish to catch on an artificial lure (although they do take bait). In that case, bow fishing seems to be the ...


7

Bow fishing is a sportsmanship hobby like any other. If you like the idea of bow fishing, then try it. If you like the idea of rod and reel fishing, then try it. Which is better? Well, you can only shoot a fish you can see with the bow, and rod fishing lets you hunt for fish in places you couldn't possibly think to use a bow, such as deep water, thick ...


6

To answer your question, I can refer to this answer on this question. Check out point 5: 5. Tillering Hang the bow up horizontally on a branch or piece of scrap wood by the handhold. Now pull down a few inches on the string while observing how the limbs bend. Now, not only do you want each limb to bend evenly throughout its length, you also ...


6

In the US southwest, Juniper was commonly used by native peoples. I've heard it said that one can still find living Juniper trees around the southwest that have apparent 'slices' taken out of them where material was removed to shape a bow. Also, a quick google search turned up this site with a seemingly comprehensive list of woods that will work for bow ...


6

When I was a kid I repeatedly made simple bows from hazel trees/shrubs. The main advantage here is that it grows in very handy, more or less uniformly thick branches that are very appropriate in size to use as bows (also make good walking sticks/spears). As strength/durability of the bow was never an issue we used freshly cut, green branches - obviously a ...


6

It all depends on the bow. I'll run through the three most common. For a recurve. Never left strung and detach the limbs. My personal superstition is make sure the top and bottom bolts always go in the same locations, but this isn't proven to make any difference. Make sure it is kept in a dry place. You can get some nice padded boxes to store them in. When ...


5

It comes down to a few things. Some people like adding things to their bows. If it can fit on it they will have it. I once saw someone using a recurve with 9 stabilisers. Others like to pretend they are hunting without the actual death bit. Quite a few 3D target shooters follow a course which simulates a hunt. They could also be hunters and just leave it ...


3

it really depends on the bow tips and whether they are reinforced or not. If it's a 2013 model, I suspect that it is fine. Look at the tips, and if there is a 'reinforcement', as in if it has extra glued on material on the tips, then it has likely been made to allow the use of modern 'fastflight' type string materials. You should also contact the ...


3

While an answer shows that takedown compounds have existed in the past, it's almost certain that they will never return. Instead, hunting compounds have opted to go for very short ATA(Axle to axle) lengths. This makes for a shorter bow, often 34" or less. Much less awkward than a 64" to 68" recurve. Modern compound limbs are very highly stressed even when ...


3

It's a form of hunting. Shoot a rabbit or snare it? Rod fishing you are luring a fish into a trap, bow fishing you are actively hunting. Some say you need an entire new kit but all you really need is a specialised type of arrow. It is all down to preference really.


3

The forces are really trying to pull the ends of the bow forward. The bow string is not elastic and so does not store energy. The end of the bow may snap back and hit you uncomfortably, but it's not going to whip back at amazing speeds. The arm will basically just let go, and the stem and other arm will get flung by the stores energy. However. You should ...


2

This picture shows the proper technique for stringing a recurve bow without stringer. (In @Charlie Fishers link this is called the Step-Through Method.) It's what all the people in my archery club did when they didn't use the fixed stringer mounted on the club house wall. This included many different recurve archers, including people who shoot (quite ...


2

I always take a few moments when stringing to make sure the stringer and bow are as in line and level as possible before actually pulling up. From the position I'm normally in while stringing it often looks misaligned, but it's almost always been because of the perspective and not that it actually is. Though taking a moment to make sure that's the case has ...


2

Here's an old video of a Fred Bear Borsalino take-Down compound bow being taken down and put back together. There is also a Fred Bear TRX 32 take-down compound bow on ebay. I didn't see any of these during a quick look at their website, so I wonder if anything like this is currently in production.


2

Possibly, but I highly doubt it. The thing is that it's not that easy to restring a compound bow and most people would probably pay someone else to do it for them. Recurve bows are much easier to restring yourself and they do make takedown version of them. In theory one could do this by simply disassembling a regular compound bow with allen wrenches but it'...


1

You have a couple of options, A soft case for your bow, put the bow inside the case and strap the whole thing to your backpack. A bow case with backpack straps. A bow case with a padded shoulder sling (these are more common than ones with backpack straps).


1

Most recurves and selfbows I have shot behave best with an arrow that is close to or at 10GPP. My definition of behave though is related to performance related to hunting - I want a heavier arrow to have more kinetic energy downrange. I shoot no less than 9GPP, the lighter arrows just have to much string twang for me and makes me nervous. I'd start with ...


1

In the Canadian prairies saskatoon and choke cherry trees were used to make bows by the first nations.


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