28

This is almost exactly the opposite of what you think it is - it is actually from a burrowing animal, so instead of flying, it is actually burrowing into the sub-surface liquifaction layer of the sand and leaving behind this imprint. I think (correct me if I am wrong), but it is likely that the start of the burrow is the depression above your toe and the ...


22

This is, I believe, a silverfish. This is the picture from the Wikipedia article; A silverfish (Lepisma saccharina) is a small, primitive, wingless insect in the order Zygentoma (formerly Thysanura). Its common name derives from the animal's silvery light grey colour, combined with the fish-like appearance of its movements. The scientific name (L. ...


11

I too think it's from a burrowing animal. Instead of crab I would say it is some kind of lugworm/sandworm. I found this similar image: https://www.plainpicture.com/de/images/1443397 The keywords for this image contain "Wattwurm" = lugworm, though the image might be mislabeled.


6

I just wanted to say that they are not considered a pest as some comments are telling you, they are considered beneficial. From the German Wikipedia article roughly translated: "Silverfish in low numbers are harmless. In fact they are beneficial because they eat mold. High numbers of them is usually a sign of a big mold infestation." I myself ...


5

The lack of body segments and the elongated proboscus indicates that it is most likely a tick. Ticks are all blood-sucking and can carry a range of diseases, some of which are quite dangerous, such as Lyme disease. It would seem that there is no difference in abundance between rural and urban (parkland) areas (possibly paywalled article) in Poland for tick ...


1

Found it - almost certainly the Poplar-borer beetle (Saperda calcarata). Distinguishing characteristics are the golden/yellow spots under the black speckles. Borers all have that shape to the head and thorax. Longhorn indicates the long antennae. These are quite a destructive pest of poplar and a few other species in much of North America. Note I'm not an ...


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