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34

It looks like there is some truth in it. I don't think that it has to do with the sheep so much as it does with their grazing habits. During the day, mosquitoes like to rest in tall grass or among shrubs in a moist, shady spot. Keeping the grass short deprives them of a resting place. Source More sheep means less tall grass and therefore less ...


24

As per Aravona's comment, this is a firebug (Pyrrhocoris apterus). According to Wikipedia, they are not dangerous and nothing to worry about. German version has way more info about this than the English one. Also, they seem to be very common in Europe and parts of Africa and Asia.


22

You will pick up ticks by spending a lot of time outdoors, but I routinely find them after walking across 10 ft of grass between my car and my front door. No matter how much prevention you practice, keep an eye out for Lyme symptoms, and go to the doctor for antibiotics if they show up. A vaccine would be much nicer. The socks-in-your pants method is very ...


22

I use a repellent that contains 30% Lemon Eucalypus Oil and have found it to be effective against flying insects. According to testing done by consumer reports, it is also effective against ticks (despite this being an "off label" use). It does not contain DEET, (which can melt certain plastics and rubbers and ruin your $500 hardshell), though it is not ...


22

You vill have to sacrifice some convenience. I suggest inverting a wide-mouthed plastic cup as a barrier over the can. Remove the cup when you want to drink, drink from the can, and then immediately replace the cup. Eventually you will drop or knock over the cup. Wipe with the cleanest thing you have available and replace. A little dirt won't harm you. ...


20

Don't open the can far enough for a bee to get in I have a freind who drinks from soda cans by only opening them a little bit. I find it quite weird, but having tried it it doesn't really make a lot of difference. When you "pull the tab" or ringpull, just do it a little so the soda can come out, but the bees cannot get in. You can open them to various ...


18

Probably the single most important thing I do is to tuck the bottom of my pants into the socks. Ticks like to crawl upwards. If they drop onto your feet, they will crawls upwards on your leg looking for the first bit of soft skin with blood vessels close to the surface. If they can get inside your pants, they will find such skin eventually. Otherwise, ...


17

Sulfur is often suggested for natural mosquito repellents. I've seen recommendations for taking sulfur pills, making sulfur creams, or applying sulfur powders. According to the Colorado State University Extension, the sulfur content of cloves is the science behind garlic-based repellents or recommendations to consume garlic. That said, I would not think ...


16

Besides DEET, the CDC lists: Picaridin (Cutter Advanced, Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus, and Autan (outside the United States)) Lemon Eucalyptus oil (PMD)** (no examples given) IR3535 (Skin So Soft Bug Guard Plus Expedition) In particular, Picaridin seems to be a viable alternative: Of the active ingredients registered with the EPA, CDC believes that two ...


16

Most folks I know (including the Royal Marines) swear by Avon's Skin So Soft to repel most biting insects - it certainly works well against midges in Scotland. It is also much less harmful to the environment than DEET and leaves your skin extra soft :-)


15

Mosquitoes love me, so I've had opportunity to try many variations of repellent. Most of the things you mentioned are effective immediately after application. For me, the difference is how effective they are after hours of sweaty hiking. For that, I lean towards high percentage DEET in a lotion-type formulation like 3M Ultrathon (that particular one is 35%...


15

You are likely talking about eye flies. They feed on lachrymal secretion which your eyes produce. When they get too intense, if hiking, I either walk faster and away from wet area or use a good head net. Peter Vacco have good information on flies and also happen to make really good head nets.


15

Coincidentally one of the physicians of Tropical Disease at a major Toronto Hospital has recently done a write up on ticks and how to deal with them. You can find the full article here. Here is the relevant part in case the link breaks in the future. What you can do: Insect repellants are effective at keeping ticks away. Dr. Keystone also recommends ...


15

Repellants containing DEET are the most effective and the only method I've been happy with. It is a harsh chemical but does NOT need to go on your skin. Spray 95%-100% DEET on the top and bottom of your hat brim, your backpack shoulder straps or the neck and shoulders of your shirt and socks. This works for me most of the time. When it doesn't I put on a ...


15

Using canoe paddles to rig tarp shelters seems to be a common practice (e.g. see here or here). I would rig them as in the diagram below - as for an A-frame tarp shelter. I would expect you would need more than 1m height for the centre of the net so I would use the paddles whole not split. The two paddles are on end, pointing up, with the top ends ...


14

The more common term is "mining bees". As the name says, they build nests underground, usually in sandy ground. The other big difference between them and regular honey bees, is that they are so-called solitary bees, so they do not form hives. The nest is built by a single female, who lays eggs in several chambers and provides each with pollen and nectar. So ...


14

The practice of eating insects is called entomophagy. References using that term can include many insects. I've narrowed it down to ants and termites as best as I could, although some of the general advice and information include ants, termites, and other insects. The short answer is that not all ants and termites are safe to eat, but most of those you're ...


13

I've been battling the little buggers for half a century. Here's what I've learned. Take them seriously! Most of the time they're only a minor irritant, but at their worst they're very nasty. I've twice had to help people in toxic shock from midge attack. Make sure you're prepared. Know your enemy They don't like sunlight, so are are more active at dawn ...


13

It's the Great Peacock Moth Caterpillar. See Wikipedia for other images, including a painting of the moth by Van Gogh. Saturnia pyri, the giant peacock moth, also called the great peacock moth, giant emperor moth, or Viennese emperor, is a Saturniid moth which is native to Europe. It is the largest European moth, with a wingspan reaching 15-20 cm. ...


12

It looks like the answer is yes it is safe after it drys, Do not expose cats to wet permethrin as it affects their central nervous system. This is not true with dogs, horses, or cows. Cats can be around permethrin treated fabrics once the application has dried. Source If a product containing permethrin is applied to a dog and there are cats in the ...


12

A swarm (used in the technical sense to mean that clump you show in your question) is about the least dangerous formation in which you can encounter bees. Their bellies are full (they eat before they swarm) they have no hive to defend, and you are basically not of interest to them. Beekeepers literally gather swarms into buckets to put them into new hives. (...


12

I can think of a few solutions: Stretch a square of mosquito netting over the mouth of the can, with a rubber band to secure it in place. Buy and use a soda can lid. Switch to 2L bottled soda and use auto-sealing bottles.


12

When I was a kid, we had like plastic lids that fit over the top of pop cans, designed to keep out the yellowjackets (wasps that like your sweet beverage). You opened a hinged trap over the can's opening to drink the product. I couldn't find the exact one, but it was similar to this: (Can Covers)


12

This is definitely a tick. If it were a spider it would appear that the legs all come from a central point, as spider bodies are separated into segments, whereas tick bodies are not. There are two main types of ticks - hard ticks and soft ticks. They look quite different. Hard ticks have what's known as a scutum (translates to shield) that covers the front ...


11

First of all don't scratch. blood sucking insects inject anti-coagulant under your skin to prevent your blood from clotting and forming a scab so they don't get their mouthes stuck inside you while sucking. If you scratch, you only manage to spread the anti-coagulant around under your skin, which intensifies the itch and makes things worse. Train your brain ...


11

Most likely a Caddisfly. They make homes of twigs and stones. CADDISFLY: The caddisfly lives only a short time as an adult but may spend several years as a larva. Many larvae can do something few aquatic insects can – they build their own shelter. Different kinds of caddisflies build different types of homes. Some species build homes of leaves ...


11

Lice are passed on by one of two manners. Either by direct contact or indirect contact with someone who is infected with lice. The chances of coming in contact with lice in the wilderness is exceedingly remote. A camp site that has been abandoned for several days would be free of lice if it was actually occupied by an infested person. First of all, there ...


11

Its very hard to distinguish from that sound clip but my guess as to what you are hearing is probably cicadas depending on your location. They can sound like a buzzing or hissing noise and generally are most active during the peak of summer. If you look you will probably find their shells they have left behind after crawling out of the ground to start their ...


11

There are proven ways using commercial bug-repellents sprays and lotions. I'd consider non-commercial, DIY ways using Eucalyptus. Eucalyptus oil: If you are carrying Eucalyptus oil, you can rub a few drops of oil on your forehead, neck and nose. Such oil on skin-scratch or a pimple may make burning sensation, but there is no harm. In such a case, you can ...


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