Hot answers tagged

37

I am almost certain that you will be safe. Permethrin is not particularly toxic to humans, and exposures of notably higher concentrations than what you used for the clothing treatment have been found to not be a significant issue. In fact, there are treatments for head lice using 1% Permethrin, applied directly to the scalp, so I wouldn't worry too much ...


22

The answer is to limit and/or control ventilation. You want to make sure that there is little to no ventilation of the odours/gazes into the space (tent/hut/...) where humans are using the toilet. This might be more or less practical depending on your specific setup, or rather how sophisticated your "hole in the ground" actually is. What I have ...


16

Your chief problem seems to be: with tens of flies trying to fly into your nose, mouth, and eyes Why not a mosquito head net? It's safe, re-usable, portable, and non-lethal! Like the old saying goes: "If you can't beat them, let them join you!" err, or something like that... Source


15

If possible, try to make a "dry toilet" use of the facility you've to deal with. Dry toilet means that excrement will not be leaved exposed to the air but have to be covered with some carbon-rich organic material like saw dust, fine triturated hay or straw, dried leaves, or what so ever (triturated newspaper or what ever sort of paper/carton), if ...


10

drugs.com notes the Usual Adult Dose for Scabies is a Permethrin topical 5% cream, applied by thorough massage into the skin. 30 grams. That's essentially 1,5 grams pure permethrin applied to the skin directly. I don't recommend doing so unless it's required, but if your spray is 0,5% and you've applied twice what is recommended, it would seem you're still ...


5

Wild Plantain! I have very strong reactions to stings, but this "weed" has provided the most and swiftest pain and swelling reduction for bee/wasp stings that I have found in around 40 years of traipsing around the woods. I've been able to find it 3 seasons of the year in cities and in the country. I typically make a simple spit poultice, just chew ...


5

I would be worried that high enough heat to kill an insect might damage the tent too - not to mention that with the bulk of material and the impermeable nature of it, you are likely making it a fire risk with heat build-up. I would instead do the opposite - put your tent in the freezer! Freezing is quite effective at killing many insect pests. Ideally you ...


4

I suspect that these are likely to be Ticks. You don't describe where in the world you are, or the size of the animal in question, but based off the threads in the background I would estimate about 3-5 mm long. They have no obvious dividing line down the scute, so unlikely to be beetles, and there is no obvious division of head, thorax and abdomen, as you ...


4

The short answer is No. A slightly longer answer is, no need to worry. I have lived through two 17-year cicada swarms, and while many people made enormous fusses about how loud their noise was, how many there were, how horrible they looked, how disgustingly they crunched underfoot on their front sidewalks (if so, get a broom and sweep before you), I just ...


4

The long and the short of it is no. Most insect repellents against biting insects (e.g. mosquitoes) work either by confusing the insect by blocking the scent receptors (e.g. Picaridin, DEET), or by killing the insect before it can bite (e.g. Permethrin). As cicadas are incidentally identifying you as a tree (i.e. something upright), they are not attracted to ...


3

We simply used builders lime (Ca(OH)2) (calcium hydroxide) powder after every toilette use to cover everything up. But be careful with that, it's not a toy and can serious harm humans


3

One method is to provide a screened light-pipe as ventilator, and use an unlit room. Flies fly down into the 'hole in the ground', then up the ventilation pipe to the light. They accumulate in the ventilation pipe, blocked from exit by the screen. Deep-drop toilets often do not have a ventilation pipe, and are sometimes open to the sky at foot level, or just ...


3

They are definitely not ticks, those are way smaller and flat. These look much bigger, especially compared to the window. I cannot see it clearly, but my first guess would be that it's a vine weevil. Some bigger photos and infos about your whereabouts (continent, country, latitute etc) would narrow the results down.


3

Welcome to the site. I think, but am not sure that these are bedbug nymphs. Based on the photo I found (below) from University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources, I think that you have the second stage nymph (left hand side, about 1/2 way down), which has an obvious gut filled with blood. The best way to be sure is to get an expert in. Contact a ...


2

The following is based on experience building toilets for places of worship in rural Africa: Keep the toilet room dark. Without light inside the toilet room (tent/hut etc.), the flies are attracted out from below in the pit via other routes to the outside, not into the toilet room, e.g. via a ventilation gap in the cover above the pit, but outside the room. ...


2

Long-horned grasshopper or Great green bush-cricket(Tettigonia viridissima) https://www.britannica.com/topic/long-horned-grasshopper-2096594 The image on this page looks almost identical to yours, and it is a female if I read the page correctly so it could well be laying eggs. They're native everywhere but Antarctica, though most common in the tropics.


1

It is difficult to tell based on those photos, but based on the photos and your description, I suspect these are common carpet beetles. These are small 2-4mm beetles who grow from larvae that eat certain fabrics. They are usually found around undisturbed fabrics such as an idle guest bed or unused curtains.


1

They look like stink bugs. You may notice an odor in your vacuum since they smell bad when smashed. They are a nuisance but don't really harm anything.


1

Why do people think they must kill insects when they are a part of the natural world? When there is an over abundance, as this 17 year cycle promises, use the bounty to supplement your diet. Shrimp, lobster, and crab are related to insects such as cicadas in taste and cooking methods. https://lancasteronline.com/news/17-year-cicadas-are-edible-taste-a-lot-...


1

This may be a southern US thing, but tobacco either from a cigarette or the chewing type can be used to reduce pain in a bee/wasp sting. It can be done by getting the tip of a cigarette wet then squeezing liquid out onto the sting or by mixing the dry tobacco with water to make a paste, chewing tobacco can be used in the same way by getting it wet then ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible