Hot answers tagged

94

When talking about fresh, dry clothes then it's not true. More layers definitely equals warmer! As pointed out in the comments if you really go to extremes then more layers doesn't necessarily equal warmer, but to get to that point you have to really cram yourself in the bag so there's no insulating air between the layers. You could also make yourself so ...


74

Humans have a few intuitions about how temperature, heat, and liquids work. These intuitions lead us astray for the specific case of a bladder full of urine. "Keeping Warm" / "Cooling down" The first intuition is that things cool down on their own: If you leave a pie from the oven on your counter, it eventually cools down to room temperature. We believe ...


72

From a thermodynamics point of view, I'd say you should leave the water in. Temperature is a measure of the active kinetic energy of the molecules in a substance. Warming up is essentially the surrounding environment imparting some of its kinetic energy into the object being warmed up. Simply thinking about that, the more you have that needs warming, the ...


61

Tying knots is actually a bit of an art. Depending on what you need it for, there are knots that slide, create loops, tighten under load, and do tons of other things. Here are some backcountry essentials: Bowline Knot: Use this when you need a knot that absolutely, positively will not slip (unless loaded wrong). When I was in camp, we'd use these when ...


55

Common mistakes, some of which I've made: Unfamiliarity with equipment - this isn't specific to winter camping of course, but if you've used all the gear before in milder conditions, then there's obviously less that's new to you. So if you're using a different tent to summer, make sure you've spent a night in it before the winter, so that you know where ...


52

After a bit of digging I found this, which covers some in Europe (not extensively as I first thought!) It's worth pointing out that while for some (and probably most people here) wild camping means free-camping wandering around with a tent and supplies on foot, for many others it can mean driving around and parking up somewhere in a motor home. I refer to ...


48

We (Kent and Deny) did an experiment in order to shed some light on this debate. We found that keeping the water in the cooler along with the ice kept the overall temperature of the cooler below 5 degrees Celsius for approximately 4 hours longer than when the water was removed. Experiment. We filled a Coleman cooler with 12 341mL bottles of Waterloo Dark ...


44

Absolutely not! Fire is the obvious risk, but carbon monoxide poisoning should be taken seriously as well. If the weather is bad, at the very least cook under the vestibule with maximum ventilation. Others have brought up a great point about bear country. It's recommended to cook and eat at least 100 yards away from your camp site when there may be bears ...


40

As long as you are okay with grinding your beans at home, why not just make cowboy coffee. Basically you Put your tin cup on the fire/stove and bring the water to a boil Remove the cup from the heat and let the water cool a bit so you don't burn the grounds Stir in the grounds and bring the water back to a simmer being careful not to burn the coffee Remove ...


38

Some common mistakes, definitely nothing close to exhaustive, so feel free to edit (I'll make it a community wiki if appropriate). If the point is about what you should do, the mistake is not doing it ;) Underestimating the sleeping pad, You need a well insulated pad. There are various designs, but while R-Value isn't an absolute measure, it still is a good ...


37

If you have children with you, you will have no worries about keeping yourself busy, you'll be plenty busy. If the weather is nice, your kids might enjoy games like: Throw Rocks in the Water Run Around As Fast As You Can See If You Can Throw A Prized Toy Into A Tree And Get It Stuck There Find A Stick and then Fight Over Whose Stick It Is My kids also ...


36

Others will tell you exactly what to bring, maybe even recommend brands. I'm going to cover things at a much higher level, with a few specific tips. The basic requirements of camping match the basics of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs: Physiological needs (food, clothing and shelter) Safety needs (hope for the best, plan for the worst) Self Actualization (you'...


36

Yes, it is definitely doable. -20°C is only -4°F. The real question is whether it is doable by you at the level of discomfort and hassle you are willing to put up with. Only you can answer that. At best we can point out what the hassles and discomforts will be. First, your fear of dying of cold in your sleep is silly. You'd have to do something ...


36

I'm from British Columbia; lots of BC is technically a rain forest, which pretty much means you're always starting your fire with wet wood. The trick to getting wet wood to light is to generate a lot of heat when you first start your fire - that means using lots of extra kindling. Cut triple or quadruple the amount of fine kindling and build yourself a ...


36

Effectively, it isn't much better to sleep on an air mattress that isn't specifically made to insulate from the ground than on the ground itself although it does make a slight difference. The main takeaway is that you should always avoid sleeping directly on the ground so even a poorly insulated air mattress will be better than nothing. Your friend isn't ...


35

In the corridor zone (where you are planning) you are only allowed to camp at designated campgrounds, which are secured on a reservation basis. If they are full, of the options you list, 2. Pray hard a permit is available when I show up is your best bet. The park leaves a percentage of permits unreserved for the main corridor (which includes the Bright ...


35

To add to the already-good other contributions: Wearing cotton clothing is a common mistake. When cotton gets wet (from sweat or external sources), it doesn't quickly get dry, and that cold moisture close to your body conducts heat away. To underscore another answer's point even more, layering is also important; use non-cotton layers wherever possible. ...


34

Sometimes, regardless of the pins, it's simply impossible to put pins into the ground no matter the technology. In such a situations, boulders may be your friend: Raising a tent between Baugevatnet and Sijdasjávrre, near Narvik, Norway, ~68.1°N, 1 October 2012. The ground was frozen solid and it was completely impossible to drive a peg into the ground. My ...


34

As a former soldier (and Medic), I personally don't flavour my water during the outdoors. The contents of the canteen/flask might be required for a non-drinking purpose such as: Eyewash Rinsing Medical Cleaning etc However, I do flavour my water on a day-to-day basis for the gym etc using super-concentrate micro capsules such as Squash'd If you have ...


33

One reason (and I don't know enough to suggest this is the main reason) is for identification. When putting a tent up you may have a bundle of fabric that you need to set down on an uneven surface, sort and erect. Having it in black distinguishes it from the varied colours of the tent walls so you can always place your tent floor down, without having to ...


33

This depends enormously on landscape, weather, and infrastructure. I grew up in The Netherlands several hundred meter from a motorway, but with good noise barriers, we heard almost nothing. My friend lives less than 100 metre from a noise-barriered motorway and it's nearly inaudible. Now I live several km from a motorway in England, without noise barriers....


31

If it's raining or very humid you are probably going to have to put up with some condensation, but to try and reduce it, look for ways to minimise water vapour and increase ventilation. The following may help, but obviously not all will be appropriate for the conditions you are camping in. Sources of water vapour: Combustion of fuel in a stove and steam ...


31

It's difficult to tell exactly how long wood you've gathered will last you, unless as an expert you can gauge an accurate estimate due to the type of wood, weather conditions and other contributing factors (theoretically possible, but above my ability level.) However, there are different ways of constructing a fire, and one in particular is designed to burn ...


31

I regularly backpack overnight with two dogs (one is a great dane / lab mix) in the US. A tired dog is a good dog. I have an advantage of several miles of hiking in, but you can still tire the dog out when you get there. A frisbee (flying disc) and swimming works well for my big guy (the lab mix), my smaller girl is tired from the hike itself. Whatever ...


31

The best way is to reduce (actually to remove) any kind of attractions they like: food and water. If they cannot find anything useful, than they will stop releasing scents that attracted other ants. This means, you have to make sure there is no (open) water or drinks nearby, no sugar in any way, and no food in general. Keep everything enclosed, in such a ...


30

Possibly. the reason this is a consideration is best way to stay warm is with loose layers (multiple depending on the temp) that trap air pockets close to the body that are heated BY the body. if you are in your birthday suit you will trap a decent larger pocket of air around you. BUT a single sleeping bag will NOT keep you warm this way. if you go this ...


30

If one looks at the list on Wikipedia of fatal attacks, one will notice that fatal cougar attacks are pretty rare. At least 20 people in North America were killed by cougars between 1890 and 2011, including six in California. Children are particularly vulnerable. The majority of the child victims listed here were not accompanied by adults. So just ...


30

I've used one of these filter holders on top of a thermos, pouring hot water a little at a time. If you don't want to carry a thermos, use a mug. A largish single-walled mug + one of these and a few filters will probably weigh about as much as the coffee grounds.


30

Soak the mug in a sink of hot water to warm it up quickly. Be prepared to pry the gas cartridge out quickly, perhaps using small screwdrivers or needle nose pliers. The thermal mass of the gas in the cartridge will help slow it heating. Some shaking may help. Then, don’t do that again;)!


29

Don't get wet! No I'm not being facetious, I hike through the rain forests of BC all the time, I've spent days in a row in solid rain while backpacking and setting up camp. Getting wet up here can mean death overnight even in the middle of summer, doesn't matter how hot it gets during the day, temperatures can drop to near zero overnight, if you're wet when ...


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