Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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40

As long as you are okay with grinding your beans at home, why not just make cowboy coffee. Basically you Put your tin cup on the fire/stove and bring the water to a boil Remove the cup from the heat and let the water cool a bit so you don't burn the grounds Stir in the grounds and bring the water back to a simmer being careful not to burn the coffee Remove ...


36

Effectively, it isn't much better to sleep on an air mattress that isn't specifically made to insulate from the ground than on the ground itself although it does make a slight difference. The main takeaway is that you should always avoid sleeping directly on the ground so even a poorly insulated air mattress will be better than nothing. Your friend isn't ...


31

The best way is to reduce (actually to remove) any kind of attractions they like: food and water. If they cannot find anything useful, than they will stop releasing scents that attracted other ants. This means, you have to make sure there is no (open) water or drinks nearby, no sugar in any way, and no food in general. Keep everything enclosed, in such a ...


30

I've used one of these filter holders on top of a thermos, pouring hot water a little at a time. If you don't want to carry a thermos, use a mug. A largish single-walled mug + one of these and a few filters will probably weigh about as much as the coffee grounds.


26

The easiest and most reusable method in my opinion is the Moka Pot. Simply add water and ground beans to the base and heat over a stove or open fire. You end up with espresso in the top compartment. You can now easily regulate strength and temperature by adding hot or cold water. No filters, no bits in the bottom of your cup. Just try not to burn the coffee ...


24

What mistakes did these girls make during their camping trip? I don't know that they made any glaring mistakes. The only caution I would note (and you'll see that it's of limited value in this particular case) is that they were two women camping alone in a very remote area of North Africa (although Morocco was not considered a threat to tourists at the time)...


23

The load limit for directly mounted roof bars is around 60kg - 70kg for ordinary (European) cars. Usually the load limit for rail mounted bars is lower, but that's for vertical and dynamic load. This is a static load so you're probably ok. Basically if it was my own car and not in great condition I'd do it, attaching the hammock to the far rail and hanging ...


22

You vill have to sacrifice some convenience. I suggest inverting a wide-mouthed plastic cup as a barrier over the can. Remove the cup when you want to drink, drink from the can, and then immediately replace the cup. Eventually you will drop or knock over the cup. Wipe with the cleanest thing you have available and replace. A little dirt won't harm you. ...


20

Don't open the can far enough for a bee to get in I have a freind who drinks from soda cans by only opening them a little bit. I find it quite weird, but having tried it it doesn't really make a lot of difference. When you "pull the tab" or ringpull, just do it a little so the soda can come out, but the bees cannot get in. You can open them to various ...


19

The way to protect yourself against attacks like this is to greatly reduce the probability of being attacked. Granted, you can be attacked anywhere (Yosemite, the Appalachian Trail) for any reason or for seemingly no reason -- but choose a place for vacation where such attacks are very low probability -- Yosemite and the Appalachian Trail, despite one case ...


17

Front country is when you go camping in an established campground that is usually reached by car. While backcountry camping is when you go camping in the backcountry getting to the non established campground by foot or horseback carrying your stuff with you. So this would be an example of a front country campground with a fire ring and picnic table and a ...


14

Charlie has given you an excellent summary of the difference between the two, focused on the difference in exertion and time to reach them, and the amenities to be found at each. There is another important difference: front-country camping gives you very little, if anything, of the feeling of wilderness. You are in a campground with many other people, ...


14

I just ran the experiment of making hot coffee with a cotton coffee sock instead of doing my usual cold brew and it works fine. It's almost the same as cowboy coffee but has the advantage of seperating the grounds from the coffee. Place the coffee sock with grounds inside in water that was boiling for a couple of minutes to steep. Remove sock and drink ...


14

There are a number of articles on the web telling you how to kill ants that invade your campsite with common household products. See, for example, Tips And Tricks To Stop Ants From Invading Your Camp. Also, as @Michel Keijzers said in his excellent answer, be fanatical about removing ant attractants. However, I suggest considering a different strategy. ...


14

There is an old adage One blanket underneath is worth two on top. but I can find little support for this idea except a mention on mumsnet. The reasoning is, that the floor or the ground underneath is solid, and has a much higher thermal capacity than the air above, and so will draw a lot of heat away from your body. It's not just the temperature of the ...


12

I can think of a few solutions: Stretch a square of mosquito netting over the mouth of the can, with a rubber band to secure it in place. Buy and use a soda can lid. Switch to 2L bottled soda and use auto-sealing bottles.


12

When I was a kid, we had like plastic lids that fit over the top of pop cans, designed to keep out the yellowjackets (wasps that like your sweet beverage). You opened a hinged trap over the can's opening to drink the product. I couldn't find the exact one, but it was similar to this: (Can Covers)


12

My solution is the same arrangement I use at home. I use a Porlex hand grinder to grind the beans, and an Aeropress to do the extraction. The Porlex mini grinder (https://www.porlexgrinders.com/collections/frontpage/products/porlex-mini-grinder) is perfect for a single dose of grounds, and is very compact; although it doesn't have a convenient way of ...


11

I would attach rope to both rails and perhaps even the door pillar on the opposite side. This would help spread the load if you’re worried about weakening the rail. Update: In fact why not just tie across the roof to the opposite door pillar and simplify the task. One knot.


11

I'd like to first say that I'm not sure that these suggestions would have helped the hikers described in the post. Here are some suggestions which may help to avoid human threats. Camp relatively near many other groups of campers or, preferably, near authorities, such as near a park ranger station As #1 isn't always possible, it can be possible to camp in a ...


11

Some more factors here: 1) Even if the air in the air mattress was the same temperature as the outside air it has much less thermal capacity and thus will take your heat away slower. 2) An air mattress will spread the pressure more evenly--your sleeping bag won't be as compressed at pressure points and thus heat will escape from them slower.


10

My Dad drinks canned beverages regularly while working outside, and his go-to solution for keeping wasps/hornets/etc out of the cans is a small disk or square of 1/2" plywood about 4" square (or diameter) placed on top of the can. If there is a gap caused by the tab sticking up a bit then he will remove the tab, but usually the weight of the piece of ...


9

A few drops of baby oil (light nontoxic mineral oil) to suffocate the cockroach, then blunt tweezers or alligator forceps to carefully remove it once dead and motionless, if it is visible and easily grasped without rupturing the body of the roach or damaging the ear (don’t dig around blindly in the ear with any object). To prevent injury one should strongly ...


9

I checked the Ashley Book of Knots, and as #1044 I find your knot. A very compact loop tied with a bight, for use in the end only. It does not have a name in that book but may have been named by someone since the book was finished in 1939, or published in 1944. Or even before, as even as careful as Clifford W. Ashley was, he did miss some names. (As I ...


9

This happened to me, but with a brick of pineapple juice instead of a soda can. Lucky for me, I'm not allergic to anything, but I still had to get a methylprednisolone shot just to deal with the inflammation of my tongue. In my experience, wasps will bother you if you have sweet drinks anywhere near you, no matter what you do. Even if you keep every bottle ...


8

There are basically two major types of generators for this situation: traditional and inverter generators. The expensive ones are the inverter generators, and the difference between the two types is the major price differentiator. The electrical power used in residential applications, and likewise the devices you'd power in a camping situation, is ...


8

Presuming that you have a modern can, the simplest solution I can think of is to rotate the ring-pull 180 degrees around its axis, so that the lever is over the opening (as per the image below, but without the straw). This may not be an infallible solution, but it should reduce the probability of a bee entering the can, and still allow you to drink in a ...


8

Take a pen or fork and jam/poke it at the top of the can where the tab is connected to the top of the can. See diagram below: I've done this almost my whole life, it would look like it would be hard to drink from, but it is really easy. It's kind of like drinking from a sports bottle nozzle. Also if you're feeling a bit adventurous, aim it an arms length ...


8

I have used a travel coffee plunger with pre-ground coffee. It worked well (I actually prefer plunger coffee to espresso) but after a couple of trips I decided that the extra bulk wasn't worth it for the nice coffee in the morning. Coffee bags are fine for me. I have seen people in huts use travel espresso kits similar to this one from GSI. They all raved ...


8

If you're an espresso purist you could try a minipresso. They're a hand powered esspresso machine. I was introduced to them by a climbing guide who actually climbed with one and brewed up on top of a pitch.


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