21

This information is available under the Specs on Jetboil's website. 100g canister: 100g fuel; gross weight 194g; empty weight 94g (51.5% fuel by weight) 230g canister: 230g fuel; gross weight 356g; empty weight 126g (64.6% fuel by weight) 450g canister: 450g fuel; gross weight 645g; empty weight 195g (69.8% fuel by weight)


14

If you don't have a scale, you can still figure out roughly how much fuel is in each canister with a simple bowl of water. Drop a full canister in bowl of water and mark the water line. Then, drop an empty one in the bowl of water and mark the water line. This gives you your full and empty lines for reference. Now you can drop each of your partially-full ...


12

Different gasses have different boiling points. Under boiling point the gas is liquid and doesn't have enough pressure to come out from the canister (if used in upright position). The boiling points of usual gasses used in (camping) gas stoves are: Propane: −42.25 to −42.04 °C Butane: −1 to 1 °C Isobutane: −13 to −9 °C source Wikipedia: Propane, butane ...


10

While there seem to be a few different mixtures, key to them all is a lower vapourisation temperature requirement and lower viscosity so they are easier to ignite. In cold weather, normal fuel may not flow well or may not be able to light as it won't vapourise.


10

Looking at the photo, if the ground is as soft as that, burying the canister by 2-3 cm could help a lot. If you're camping at a beach and bury it halfway in the sand, then that should even work in high winds. Apart from that, if you're willing to buy a new stove, there are a number of them that come with built-in legs, such as this one


9

If it seems unstable as in wobbly then you might get better results by clearing out the ground you place it on so you have a level surface to work with (or by building a level surface with rocks or what you can find) Another option is to get legs that attach to the underside of the bottle to make the setup more stable. Here is an example from ebay, but ...


9

You are correct that using or any attempt to empty damaged or rusty containers has a significant potential for personal injury or death. This is the US redneck answer, it may not be appropriate in your (or any) area. Use them for target practice with a long range rifle. Place the containers down range on the ground, return to the shooting line and when ...


8

I Googled and found there is a least one store (top return) that is open daily from 9AM to 5PM. It also offers 24/7 pickup and drop off of rental supplies. So yes you can get gas cartridges on a Sunday in Reykjavik. Their address is as follows: Barónsstígur 5 101 Reykjavik - Iceland Tel. +354 647 0569


7

The background It took me a moment to find it, but an example of a car in which this happened can be seen here. If the fuel in the canister becomes sufficiently warm the pressure can rupture the canister. Usually the bottom everts first, popping outwards, although I have heard of instances where this was immediately followed by it coming apart, so this ...


7

This question honestly could be too localized on these specific products. However, considering the ubiquity of these stoves I find it is probably quite useful information to know if they could have interchangeable parts. MSR's Whisperlite International & Universal stoves are very similar products, but they have some fairly notable differences. Let's ...


7

In some of the National Parks in the United States there is actually a program to recycle the containers. The Propane Bottle Recycler (PBR), a mobile propane cylinder recycling unit, is now being utilized to recycle an estimated 20,000, small, one-pound propane cylinders discarded in the greater Yellowstone area each year. The recycling function of this ...


7

In UK I have only ever used the simple type. The female part of the screw thread is on the shroud which clamps around the gas cartridge, and the appliance screws into that, instead of the canister. So there is only one screw thread to manufacture for the re-usable shroud, instead of every cartridge. Apart from the trade-off between the cost of the shroud ...


6

When packing/carrying the stove there are two main aims: to not break it and not get the rest of your kit covered in fuel. There are some tips for achieving this: pack the stove somewhere secure where it won't get too knocked about/crushed/bent. Most stoves will pack inside a pot/pan which is my preferred way of doing this. Similarly for the fuel bottle ...


6

No, go ahead and leave it on, you'll likely save fuel that way, be it a very small amount, but you do lose some fuel each time you take the element off of the canister. You don't need to take it off if you're not packing it away.


6

The advantage of the "one way"/piercable canisters is that they are way cheaper (up to four times with respect to price per mass of gas according to German Wikipedia). Also they are "good enough" for many purposes, I.e. when you can leave the stove or burner attached for the lifetime of the canister.


5

My experience is with portable grills and cooktops. They're a bit different, but close enough that I think this may be informative. The valves on cheaper ($50-200) camping grills aren't the best. I've owned two that still put out some gas when they're "off". If you take the whole valve out of the grill and hold your hand over the pinhole, you can feel a ...


5

I kept a spare in my trunk for two years in the southeastern US and I never had a problem (YMMV). This, like most things in life, is not perfectly safe. So you should decide if you really need to store this in your car. If you do, things you should consider: Keep it somewhere that minimizes the risk of puncture. Keep the cap on it. Store away from ...


5

In general 'lighter' fuels with less additives will mean that the stove needs less cleaning. Most of the reason I've needed to clean a stove is from additives which don't burn properly (particularly when igniting the stove) can can block the nozzle and things. For this reason compressed gas (not gasoline) is probably best, followed by Coleman fuel (white ...


4

You should define whether you are asking about white gas stoves or isobutain (canister) stoves. For most backpackers, your main decision will be between the 2 broad stove categories: canister fuel vs. liquid fuel. You may also want to consider one of the growing number of alternative-fuel options now available.. A good resource to get started if you ...


4

This (Jetboil Crunchit Recycling Tool) was found by googling "crush isobutane fuel can" and reading this second result (right below the outoors.SE question) for the link.


4

Keeping it low down against the bottom of the car and insulated is best. The spare wheel well is ideal (and used when you get a can of tyre foam instead of a wheel; they have similar limits) or those compartments you sometimes get under the boot floor. These places are much cooler than the rest of the car, especially with the parcel shelf closed. If they ...


4

Most of the time, the "Known to the State of California" warning is an incantation to ward off lawyers. That's not true for fuel. White gas/Coleman fuel/whatever-it's-called has significant amounts of benzene, a known carcinogen, in it, as does kerosene; other hydrocarbon fuels will have trace amounts. Benzene is destroyed during combustion, but the ...


4

No. The butane will vaporize below the boiling point, just as water vaporizes below 100°C.


4

The gas is compressed in the cylinder so will largely be a liquid. This is normal and expected.


3

CampingGaz cartridges are incompatible with threaded cartridges, as the former use a kind of snap-on valve mechanism and don't have threads. Because of this, you can't use CampingGaz cartridges with threaded stoves (and vice-versa). However, if you travel to France and have to buy cartridges there, Edelrid (and potentially other manufacturers) makes an ...


3

Isobutate/Propane fuel amounts are usually presented in terms of net weight. The small canisters are usually 3.5oz ~ 4oz (100g ~ 110g). The medium canisters are usually 7.75oz ~ 8oz (220g ~ 230g). The large canisters are usually around the 16oz range (~450g). The amount of fuel depends on the brand, but that's a general guideline. Most of the "big name ...


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