Hot answers tagged

80

To answer my own question. I checked it with different dealers and experts, and all of them told that if I want to use it on regular basis, I should consider inflatables as toys. Also here in Switzerland it counts as flotation device and is not allowed more than 150 meters offshore. I bought myself a hardshell kayak for about 300$ more and next Monday I ...


34

Getting out is not the hard part. It is getting in and going again without getting wet. To get out: If the beach is large enough come in sideways, lean away from shore to as you beach. when the canoe touches bottom on the shore. sit upright and you should be well grounded and close enough to step from canoe to shore while staying dry. If the landing is ...


30

This answer is based on a 17-foot plastic Coleman canoe with an aluminium frame. The length and the plastic increase the challenges. I have over 100 miles experience now, with legs of 14 to 15 miles. After much online research I purchased a Seattle Sports All Terrain Canoe Center Cart; there is an option that includes a tow bar to connect it to your bike, ...


29

I have to contend with 100km+ winds with my 17.5ft canoe, so I've tried pretty much every method of attaching a canoe to a roof you can conceive, and the one that works the best is this one: It's called the keelover. It uses four brackets to hold the gunwales so the craft doesn't slide side to side or front to back, two boat straps to hold the canoe down on ...


29

All waters no, some places like National Parks require permits, see Dinosaur Monument and Canyonlands. It also differs state by state, in some states the water belongs to the public but not the stream bed, so floating is fine but using an anchor is trespassing. In other states the public has a right to the water and the sides to the high water mark, so one ...


28

In Canada, at least, we do distinguish between kayaks and canoes, and those are the words I'll use for the contrast here. To first make sure there's no confusion, have a look at the articles in wikipedia: "A kayak is a small, relatively narrow, human-powered boat primarily designed to be manually propelled by means of a double bladed paddle. The ...


27

The general answer is: A canoe is a boat designed or refitted to be paddled with a one sided paddle, usually while sitting on either a raised bench or one or both of your knees. A kayak is a boat designed or refitted to be paddled with a two sided paddle, usually while sitting on a seat on the floor of the boat. They're approaches to using different muscle ...


24

More canoes are destroyed by flying off a car than are wrapped around rocks. (Western Canoe Company factoid) Best is if you have roof racks. A: Secure mid point of the canoe to the back of the roof. B: Secure the stern of the canoe to the rear bumper, preferable as close to the corners as possible. C: Secure the other end of the canoe to the front bumper. ...


23

Don't violate Zebra Mussel restrictions!!! There are lots of lakes in Minnesota, and many of them are connected by streams. Its is great to paddle between them in a canoe, you can go tens of miles through dozens of lakes if you have the time and back strength. That being said, some lake have zebra mussels, and some don't. Minnesota DNR has restrictions ...


20

Upstreampaddling can be very exhausting, but in genereal it's more predictable than paddling downstream. I got my knowledge purely out of experience and not out of books, i paddled down the whole Rhine and in the process of it i had to change direction a few times, so i'll try to provide you with a rundown of the essential learnings. A River just flows ...


19

As requested, I'll give a run-down of why I am so happy with and constantly recommend the WIKE company's Woody Wagon Canoe Bicycle Trailer. I really like the DIY approach as well, but if you are going to buy something I think this is the one. I have owned one for three years now and in the summers use it several times a week. It was the only system I could ...


18

There isn't only one method, there are a few. Partially the choice depends on which canoe you have (big and wide, very stable or tippy, or a small solo) and if its calm water or not. What you can do with a big canoe might need some tweaks when it comes to some small solo and a canoe with good secondary stability will be easier to get into. Extra flotation is ...


17

With a large enough canoe, you can simply put the bike in the canoe, albeit somewhat precariously. What's more common though is for people to bike their canoe to an input, lock up the bike on shore, then return to it. A good alternative is a folding bike. They're not as efficient to ride for long distances, but can easily be fit inside a canoe. For just ...


16

These are main things that you would do. For most flow: Paddle upstream: What you'll do most of the time when there isn't much flow. Eddy-hop: Moving between the relatively still/upstream flowing parts of the river - they usually occur around bends at the sides of the river, outcrops rock in the middle of the flow or sides or, at nodes in waves(and the ...


16

Thank you to nhinkle who posted the answer that showed it is possible to put a bike in an canoe. I have something over 100 miles of canoeing with a bike and a dolly in my canoe now. I started with the bike and the dolly laying in the bottom of the canoe. But it took up lots of floor space and everything tended to get tangled together. I put the dolly in ...


16

Yes, but you might want to use a short paddle. While the difference between a canoe and a kayak in practice is only the seat, and people do swap out kayak seats for canoe saddles in playboats, you'll find that you're much closer to the water and a standard length canoe paddle is a bit awkward. You also have less freedom of body movement as a result of the ...


15

I have a 17.5' Clipper Tripper, and I live in Southern Alberta, which means I sometimes get caught on the water in Chinook winds (90km/h gusts), I know what it feels like to get tossed around in the wind like a wind sock. Unless you have a heavy load to keep the bow down, or someone in the bow that can help you out, your best option is to paddle the canoe ...


15

No. Water use, like everything else in the US, is a patchwork of Federal, State, and Local regulations plus quasi-legal muscle. Multiple overlapping laws and agencies can apply at each level. Here's some examples in my home state of Oregon. Oswego Lake In Oregon ORS 537.110 flatly states "All water within the state from all sources of water supply belongs ...


15

Lash them together in parallel with spars such that there's a wide enough gap down the middle that you can paddle in the centre. As you say, you're not going to be making tight turns, but you are in full control of both boats which is the more significant aspect. You also gain massively on stability, especially if you have other (non-able bodied) persons. ...


14

They sell fiberglass repair kits at most boating stores which are made for this exact sort of repair. It includes a fiber glass cloth which you put over the damaged area, as well as a resin / hardening agent to hold the patch in place. Any kit you buy should have instructions for applying the patch in it.


13

While I was crossing a stream, I was caught in one such but not so serious kind of a strainer. We call that strainers. These are formed when some obstacles get piled up and let a very narrow window for a person to pass through, but the water pass through it. Most of the strainers that you will (unfortunately) come across are likely to be formed by trees and ...


13

This answer is focused to a bike and canoe combination. This answer began as a an internet search, but I have completed all of the legs by bike and/or canoe. No Warranty on the information is implied here, it represents my findings at the time each piece was written. The bike trail is generally rails to trails, the trail generally well above the river (...


13

Ay-yi-yi! This is a very broad question, a true answer to which would probably require a PhD in hydrodynamics or years of relevant engineering expertise. Note that the interplay between these design characteristics can be very complex and depend greatly on the exact conditions (flat water / waves / moving water / rapids / ..., skill of paddler, travel speed,...


13

It will depend on whereabouts along the Thames you live but there are many canoe and kayak clubs and water-based outdoor recreation centres around. It is possible to get into it without any training but that's not advisable. Most clubs or centres will have some kind of beginner classes. Just do some searches. Canoes and kayaks don't need to be licensed but ...


13

I've owned both. I've also used CPVC and Royalex canoes on trips. Aluminum is noisy. You don't have to tell people that you hit a rock. They will hear, even over the roar. It's cold. If you spend time on your knees in your canoe, you will want to install foam kneelers. It's also grabby. Aluminum sticks to rocks. It dents. Bring your automotive dent ...


13

Aside from waders, there's not much you can do to guarantee your feet will stay dry. No matter how high your waterproofing goes it won't help when you fall on your side from a rock shifting under foot (it's a rare exception that it doesn't happen to somebody each trip, and you need to be prepared for that somebody to be you). A method a lot of people employ ...


12

For the specific question of drifting on the Great Lakes, doing so is effectively suicide. First, there's the matter of traffic. The Great Lakes are a major shipping lane, with upwards of a hundred lake freighters, numerous ocean-going freighters, barge traffic, and other ships traveling at all times -- not counting small private vessels. There's a very ...


11

There is not a definitive guide for all locks, however most of the major locks in the US are run by the US Army Corps of Engineers, and they do not charge recreational boaters to pass through them. To my knowledge, all locks on the Upper Mississippi are accessible via paddling. As for the Ohio river, you can try calling McAlpine lock and dam, and they'll be ...


11

John Montgomery here, designer of the Autocanoe. I think that with a careful build and a few modifications for taller freeboard and a small forward cabin a long trip would be quite viable. Especially if you have some previous experience with this kind of trip. The main thing being to foresee and plan for the mitigation of contingencies. My friend Colin ...


11

Bears don't generally like people, and the ones who do are usually going to be more interested in dumpsters and campgrounds than a random boat on the river. The likelihood of ever getting into a situation where you have to fend off a bear attack on the water is absurdly small. Bears are usually either crossing water to get somewhere else and want nothing to ...


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