28

In Canada, at least, we do distinguish between kayaks and canoes, and those are the words I'll use for the contrast here. To first make sure there's no confusion, have a look at the articles in wikipedia: "A kayak is a small, relatively narrow, human-powered boat primarily designed to be manually propelled by means of a double bladed paddle. The ...


15

Yes, it is accepted practice to wash new Semi-Static rope (or Single Rope Technique/SRT Rope as it is known by cavers). Dave Elliot is a highly respected SRT expert, and he wrote the CNCC Rope Care page, which says: There are two reasons why new ropes are best washed before use. Washing removes the anti-static lubricants used in manufacture and also ...


10

Although theoretically one can do canyoneering alone, in reality it's not something you can safely start doing all by yourself, especially since you don't have mountaineering or rock climbing experience. So the first thing to do is to try to locate someone more experience with whom you can go. Canyoneering can be dangerous, basically because it involves lots ...


10

The disciplines are very similar, and it is very easy for a climber to make the transition because they already have experience with ropes, but there are a lot of canyoneering specific skills and gadgets that are different from climbing. If I were to campare the two by their differences, I'd say that rock climbing requires more strength, and canyoneering ...


10

Canyoneering presents different risks than rock climbing because water is involved This comment on another post shows why water is an important factor (emphasis mine): Canyoneering with an autoblock actually has the potential be fatal. Wet ropes have a lot more rope-on-rope friction, if your autoblock locks up while you're in a waterfall, then you're at ...


9

Canyoneering has one major danger that is not (normally) one in mountaineering: water. If you get stuck abseiling along/in a waterfall and end up hanging in the waterfall, you can drown. An "engaged" friction knot can be difficult to loosen, especially when in an averse environment like a waterfall. The only time I did canyoning an experienced party member ...


9

The American Alpine club publishes this data for North America annually, though it's unlikely to cover all accidents. One of the best visualizations of this data I've found is from Steph Abegg: Mountaineering Accident Statistics and Mount Rainier Accident Statistics.


9

This got me curious, & using Expansion anchors in construction applications got me looking. While I couldn't find anything specific to climbing applications & submersion, I did find a reference to 304 or 316 stainless steel being used in submerged marine environments (harsher than typical freshwater) by boat builders. To my knowledge, no expansion ...


9

Quite simply, find someone else who is doing this and has been doing it for a quite a while and is willing to teach you. This sport is quite technical, and you can't do it (safely) alone anyway. One possible way is to find a company that guides canyoneering trips and get a seasonal job with them where they train you. At the very least you could make a ...


8

The big difference between canoeing and kayaking is the cargo capacity. Kayaks might have small hatches to store gear in, otherwise you're stuck with what you can lash onto the top of the kayak (or stuff down from the cockpit). Whereas canoes are the pick-up truck of the backwoods and you can have a level of great luxury, rivaling car-camping. Want a proper ...


7

In the case you don´t have an experienced friend who can help you get a start and you don´t have the luck a company will pay you for learning it, you can try the following: Look out for a canyoning association or club. Since these are non-profit organisations they often offer low-cost workshops, sometimes with equipment-rent included. Also, they are likely ...


7

I actually went Gorge Walking weekend before last near a place called Clydach (Cwm Dyar), and it was brilliant :) I went with a group of about fifteen of us and I organised it through a chap called Michael at http://www.lifechangingactivities.com/ There are some great places as @Berry120 has said in the Brecon Beacons such as the Afon Mellte - beautiful ...


7

I'm American, so I can only address canyoneering, not canyoning. Easy canyoneering is just lots of rappelling. If you're a trad climber, that means it should be mostly skills you already know. You can use a fireman's belay or a Prusik backup the same way as on rock, except that as pointed out by Shem Seger, you don't want to use the Prusik on a wet rappel. ...


7

They shrink, apparently. For example, Beal's Precautions says: Before first use, soak the rope and leave to dry slowly. It will shrink by about 5%. Take this into account when calculating required lengths. And first use means just that: The very first time the rope is used.


6

No, because whether a rope floats or sinks is dependent on its specific gravity (which in turn is dependent on the materials used). [...] Those with SG [special gravity] greater than 1 are denser than water and will, disregarding surface tension effects, sink in it. Those with an SG less than 1 are less dense than water and will float on it. [...] ...


6

I don't know of a source for Europe, but The American Alpine Club published "Accidents in North American Mountaineering" annually. Published annually since 1948, Accidents in North American Mountaineering reports on the year’s most significant and teachable climbing incidents. In each case, the American Alpine Club analyzes what went wrong, helping you ...


6

Canyoning aka Gorge Walking or Gorge Scrambling takes place in the Brecon Beacons National Park, the best known location for this activity in the UK! http://blueocean-adventure.co.uk/gorge-scrambling/


5

From a search around, it seems there's a number of places that do it in the SW of England, Devon seeming to come up a lot: http://www.yumping.co.uk/canyoning/south-west-england The other place where it seems to be popular is in the Brecon Beacons in Wales, and around that general area: http://www.adventurebritain.com/canyoning-in-wales-uk/


4

I was trained in SRT for vertical cave access before I began canyoneering. I've gone out with many people who have made the transition from rock climbing and there's a few things that they typically struggle with that no one else has addressed that I would like to. Ascending - You should ALWAYS have an emergency system in place for ascending. I wear my ...


4

I often use ropewiki. I'm not sure what they have listed globally, but they have really great write ups on lots of canyons in the US. Includes detailed information on the approaches (length, elevation, sometimes landmarks, different approaches/extensions), the rappels (how many and how long), and even the weather conditions year round to suggest things ...


4

If you have a hiking pole you can use it for self arrest. Keep the strap around your wrist. When you fall, hold that hand away from the ground. With your other hand, grab the pole a few inches from the point and jam it into the ground. It's a little like using a cumbersome ice axe.


1

A walking stick might help, but I think your best bet is going to be to sprawl out flat and dig your hands as deep into the sand as possible. Sand is not like ice. You can self arrest on ice because it's a medium that you can create friction on (scratching your pick into the ice), but sand isn't solid, it moves; flows. Getting caught in a sluff of sand ...


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