33

The important specification is how strong it is and this information seems to be missing. This is included on all climbing rated carabiners for both proper loading (along the long axis) and when it is cross loaded across the gate. You should never use a non-rated carabiner for a critical application. Most likely, there is a reason why it is not rated. ...


24

This item might be identical to a certified one, but the seller is clearly not aware of certifications, so you should assume it is not certified - in short: Do not use this carabiner for safety-relevant applications. The description on ebay says The ultimate tension: 25KN CE Certification "ultimate tension" is not a term used to describe ...


20

Give them to those who need them. First of all, novice students in your gym or mountaineering school will be happy to use a bit heavier/older gear, but ease the burden of buying everything for their first trip. Just make sure that carabiners are safe, because the newbies can't tell themselves. Then, any local non-commercial groups, who organize rope fun ...


19

You probably already do this, but make sure you mark all 'retired' carabiners with their own color of tape so that you never accidentally climb with one. Then let the fun begin. If you do any backpacking, they are extremely useful for attaching things to your backpack. A few other favorites: dog leashes, making clotheslines, or use with hammocks. If you'...


16

To put it simply, it is when the nose of the carabiner gets hooked onto something, which reduces its strength dramatically. This happens by preventing the carabiner gate from closing and keeping it in a position that results in a catastrophic load pattern. This can happen for instance when sport climbing and one goes to clip a bolt and by mistake one does ...


15

As Hillsons suggested a good way to use it, let me put in what I would do: You can use it as a Weight. Simply knot a carabiner to the end of a rope that needs slinging over a pole or onto a roof. The weight helps with accuracy. Clip keys inside backpacks to loops for extra security Link a few together for your kid to play with while you are shopping. Attach ...


14

You can drill some holes in your carabiner and use it as handle for mugs and other things in your home you need to lift. mug example


12

This is what a diagram of opposite and opposed carabiners looks like. The gates are on opposite sides and form a X when laid over the top of each other. The purpose of doing this is to make it difficult for both gates to open at the same time, because even if the rope doesn't slip out, a carabiner with the gate open is much weaker. Notice that even if one ...


12

This is probably going to be an unpopular opinion because it's not nearly as "feel good" as helping remote Asian herdsmen. (Which incidentally is probably one of few exceptions to what follows.) Nevertheless: It is my belief that unsafe carabiners should be destroyed. In my opinion it is too great a risk that someone will get ahold of one and see that it ...


12

If you're handy with welding (or a drill and screws, brackets, or a hot glue gun), you can make a pretty cool coat rack or key rack out of old carabiners. You can remove the gate for a coat rack by knocking or drilling or cutting off the pins, or leave them on if you're making a key holder. Just attached the carabiners with the hook down and out from the ...


11

The main issue is that fraud and misrepresentation is rife in the chinese manufacturing sector. When I was working in outdoors retail, I saw a couple press releases where Petzl was facing counterfeiting from China. The copies were visually identical, down to the packaging and tags. Of course, when tested, they failed at significantly lower forces than what ...


10

The method by which carabiners in any color are coated (either gate or body) is anodizing, which is going to be nearly impossible to sufficiently replicate with anything practical and cost-effective at home. With anodizing, the coating essentially becomes part of the aluminum itself. So anything you put on the gate will wear off relatively quickly and ...


10

Store your sandals or boots on the hip belt of your pack, while walking barefoot. Hook small items to your pants belt rings - while camping or in the city. Hook the nylon pouch, used to collect rubbish, to a tree branch (no one will step in it). Hang your sunglasses pouch to the plastic rings on the shoulder straps for easy access. Secure your travel mug to ...


10

For me it seems to be more a fashion thing than extremely useful. Of course you can clip the mug to the outside of your backpack or anywhere on the campside but I doubt you really need this. Nevertheless, you can upgrade nearly anything in outdoor business with a biner - it's just cool and you look like a real outdoorsman with all the handy carabiners ;) ...


10

All useful [climbing] carabiners will have a rated weight, engraved on them, usually in kN (kilonewton). Even non-climbing ones should have a rated weight. Based on the picture, and the description, I would use that one for decoration. It's not meant for climbing, it's too awkwardly shaped and the "clip" part looks way too flimsy, not to mention the ...


8

These types of carabiners are designed to be used with a Munter Hitch. The Munter Hitch was created by a Swiss mountain guide named Werner Munter who called it, Halbmastwurfsicherung, meaning half clove hitch belay. Source The abbreviation for Halbmastwurfsicherung is HMS and that is why the large/pear shaped carabiners are called HMS carabiners.


7

One real advantage is that a metal carabiner will rattle against a metal mug. Build the carabiner into the handle and that can't happen. This rattling may be simply annoying most of the time, but if you're looking for wildlife (whether to watch it or shoot it) is going to disturb your quarry. If you just move around while others are asleep, or trying to ...


7

Basically it looks like this. The rope goes from the object to a caribiner that is hooked into the anchor. Then it goes back down to where a prussik and a caribiner have been hooked to the rope going to the object. Then you take the rope through the caribiner, back towards the anchor. To make it easier one could use pulleys instead of caribiners. For ...


7

Keeping some outward tension on the belay device really helps. If you're toprope belaying you should already be doing this, if you're lead belaying basically keep the climber locked off unless you are feeding slack. The other important factor is to make sure your belay device is through the belay loop, not the two tie-in points. All harness manufacturers ...


7

Unfortunately nail polish would probably gunk up the locking mechanism. I wouldn't put nail polish on any moving piece of a carabiner. You can use nail polish to mark your gear so you know that it's yours (and not your partner's). You may be able to find a multi-color scheme that indicates the carabiner's date, but generally that's not an issue (if it ...


7

Nobody ever complained of having too many carabiners; you did not waste your money no matter what you do with it right now. Clip it to a stopper knot on the end of your reserve/back-up rope, or use it to keep a rope bag closed, or clip it to a tie-down or tow rope in the back of your truck. One day it will be exactly the piece you need at exactly the right ...


6

Nail polish is the way to go. Everyone I know, including myself, uses it to identify whose gear is whose.


6

A nalgene water bottle holder! You can then clip it to the back of your pack, and it helps with carrying it around! You may want to decorate yours though. Also caribiners are nice just to always be attached to your backpack for anything with a loop!


6

If you want one point and multiple things to connect to it, then what you do is create a master point with rope or cordellete and attach your carabiners to it. Usually the master point is a a overhand knot on a bight and the carabiners attach to the loop. That looks like this, Image Source In the other situation mentioned in the linked question where ...


5

The number one reason for having different sizes of carabiners is for working with different sizes of ropes. Size is one of many differing factors in the design of locking carabiners, there are also different shapes and different profiles, each carabiner design is intended for offering the best performance for different functions. Larger biners are ...


5

I believe that what you are referring to is called the "Texas Rope Trick". I hope that it's obvious that this is an incredibly risky idea and that you are better off just leaving the carabiner.


5

The reasons for this recommendation are the same as with the recommendation to never use the rock side biner of a quickdraw with a rope. In both cases there is metal-metal contact. This leads to scratches and in the extreme case even well visible and sensible creases. In the latter case it is very clear that you should not use it in contact with ropes. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible