24

The biggest difference in indoor climbing is that your routes are mapped out for you. It can be challenging to figure out the proper sequence, but it's much easier if you know where all the holds are right away. Another big factor is the abundance of large(ish) foothold. When setting in a gym (from 7 years of personal experience) even the tiniest jib can ...


22

In Europe we have a few systems depending on the country, so in the UK we have two grading systems, adjectival and technical and they work as follows: Easy - E Moderate M - US 5.2 Difficult D - US 5.3 Hard Diff HD Very Difficult VD - US 5.4 Hard Very Difficult HVD Severe S - US 5.5 Hard Severe HS - US 5.6 Very Severe VS - US 5.7 or 5.8 Hard Very Severe HVS -...


22

The WP article is pretty good, but SE is meant to be standalone, so I'll try to give my interpretation of the American system, the Yosemite Decimal System. This system is for free climbing (mountaineering, trad climbing, sport climbing, and gym climbing). It doesn't cover aid climbing or bouldering. 1 = Hiking. Example: Kilimanjaro. 2 = May use hands for ...


13

In the US ice grades fall into three categories; Water Ice, which is seasonal and often shifting in difficulty; Alpine Ice, which is permenent ice found on glaciers or high altitudes; and Mixed Ice, which is a mix of ice and rock. Water Ice and Alpine Ice are on the same scale -- though alpine ice tends to be a little easier at the grade. (ratings taken via ...


11

How about if you just take photos and post them on mountainproject or summitpost, along with verbal descriptions and UTM coordinates? Physically marking the starts of the routes is not compatible with a leave-no-trace ethic.


10

I wont cover what is aid climbing here. Original Aid Rating System: A0: Occasional aid moves often done without aiders (etriers) or climbed on fixed gear; sometimes called “French free”. A1: All placements are solid and easy. A2: Good placements, but sometimes tricky. A3: Many difficult, insecure placements, but with little risk. ...


10

Short answer: Climb lots of other routes in many different areas and have lots of other people climb your routes. Let me get into why you opened a can of worms with your question: Ratings for routes are almost always in a greater context both historically and in respect to their location. The people who created the Yosemite Decimal System for example had ...


9

Interesting question. Here's some speculation, but I don't know if I'm right. There has been a clear tendency for climbing grades to inflate over time. You can really see this, for example, if you look at the climbs at Tahquitz Rock that were originally used to define the Yosemite Decimal System. For example, The Trough was the original definition of 5.0, ...


9

I was a route setter at a UK Wall for about 10 years and we used two primary methods alongside each other. Experience of the route setter - before you started the route you would have a purpose, line and grade in mind based on the available hold color. If it was for a lead competition then the 'grading' is different to a party route in a top roping ...


9

The belay class in the linked answer is in reference to the typical methods one would use in grade 4 (or 5) Yosemite Decimal System. Typically, in a rock climbing context you typically see grades like 5.6, 5.10a. The 5 indicates that the route is what we commonly call "rock climbing", but grades 1-4 also exist. These are for hiking (class 1), scrambling (2 ...


8

There is no generic answer to your question - it all depends on the kind of boulders you'll encounter on your destination. For example, if you have overhanging jug problems, the technique required is similar to gym problems. But you'll rarely find finger cracks, slabby balance problems or other "outdoor-style" problems in gyms. The only technique that you'...


8

First of all: Even if in a region/guide the Yosemite Decimal System is used, you cannot be sure that ratings are comparable to other regions/guides using the same system. This varies a lot depending on the local culture and history of climbing. In general the protection rating is not primarily based on the length of a runout, but on its severity. This means ...


8

Direct Answers: 5.14b is North American scaling, which equals UIAA X+/XI− and French 8c 8b+ is French scaling, which equals UIAA X+ and North American 5.14a 8b - 150m is a 150m long 8b climb Do these grades only apply to sport routes or to trad routes as well? Like explained on Wikipedia: The British grading system for traditional climbs, also known as ...


8

I can only answer from my personal perspective. It might not be statistically relevant, but I dare say it could be a little generalisable. I have been climbing actively (more than 3 days a week), both indoors and outdoors, for the past 3+ years. I have climbed with beginners and was mentored by people that climb since the 1990s. Most of my climbing partners ...


7

Muir Valley is a privately owned area, so presumably the coins are acceptable to the retired couple that owns it. Don't know about Ontario, but in the US (the Red River Gorge aside) most climbing areas are owned by federal or state governments who may likely have regulations against physically marking the starts of the routes (this is in addition to any ...


7

I would argue you've left off the most subjective of metrics, but the most useful: similarity to other routes in the same area. I don't think there's going to be a single equation to grade a route. You'll have general rules of thumbs that hold true (more holds = easier, more overhang = harder), but those will never give you a grade from first principles. ...


7

The theory is that (sport) grades should reflect the technical skill, strength and stamina required to redpoint the route. Therefore the definition of, say a 8a route is that "a climber that consistently climbs 8a routes will succeed while a 7a+ climber will struggle" When climbers talk about grades on sections of routes, they actually mean "if this ...


6

There are many aspects to a climbing route's difficulty, so it is fundamentally questionable to lump it all into one number, and is really only accepted because most climbers don't have a huge imbalance in the different aspects of climbing proficiency, i.e. a climber who has very good technique probably climbs often enough that their power and endurance are ...


6

However, your frightening and my frightening are completely different. IMO this is less subjective than you're thinking, and the WP definition is not very good. The issue is not the spacing of the protection per se. The issue is whether or not you really have a meaningful belay, which can depend on the spacing of the pro. Here's an example of a 5.8R slab ...


6

I don't think there is an (international) standard for making brick walls or even bricks. While it's true that (most) brick walls have a 90 degrees angle, all the other features can be fairly different. Here is a list of just a few things that can differ in between brick walls: size of bricks texture of bricks (rough, smooth) amount of mortar in between ...


5

I suggest that this is because you climb in gyms more than you do outside. Back when gyms were rare, when I went to the gym, it felt way harder for the grade than outside routes. That was because I climbed outside way more than inside. Any new area seems harder because different types of rock, holds, conditions, styles, setting, etc require ...


5

Contrary to e.g. the aid climbing difficulty scale, sports climbing and bouldering scales are comparative (at least in the grades that came up after the seventies). So a grade does not directly tell how hard a climb is, it just says how hard it is related to others. You can see this very well by sometimes drastically different hard routes with the same grade ...


5

While most people think that the YDS system is easy compared to the British rating system, I am not sure that is the case. In the YDS system, there is a rating, a grade, and a class. The grade indicates the length of time the route typically requires ranging from I (the route takes a few hours) to VII (route takes a week or longer). The rating refers to ...


4

From what I can piece together, according to the The Gunks Guide by Swain the protection rating system was proposed in Rocky Heights, A Guide to Boulder Free Climbs by Erickson. According to Swain the ratings are: G Protection is commonly considered excellent. A falling leader probably will suffer no injuries in a fall, assuming he/she is competent in the ...


4

A better description for 4th class belay would be simul-climbing or running belays. That is when you are roped together with intermediate protection. I described such a scenario here. Its typically done on easier climbs when the risk of falling is much lower. 5th class is actual rock climbing with belaying from anchors or the ground. One would belay from ...


4

Required techniques vary from area to area and problem to problem, that said I think there are 3 techniques that are universal. This belief stems from my philosophy that the best thing about climbing hard is that there are more cool problems that you can climb. This is not to say there are not cool V2s (or even VBs, but a V5 climber has access to everything ...


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