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40

In the end I have contacted the manufacturer, and received a detailed answer surprisingly quickly. So turns out, that the last 2 digits of the batch number are the year of manufacture. E.g. ABCD987612 --> Year of manufacture is 2012. Additional useful information from the e-mail: The potential lifetime of this product in use is 10 years. Attention: ...


35

I just finished Caldwell's book Push. The big walls in Yosemite are essentially vertical deserts. Even in winter they're in the full sun much of the day. It would drop below freezing at night, but during the day temperatures would regularly get above 50 °F (10° C). In the summer the heat can be overwhelming. Aside from the difficulty of performing extremely ...


23

The absolute strongest? That would be an eye splice. It's the most effective and strongest form of making an eye in a rope and it's what the thimbles are designed to work with. It's nigh on permanent, but that's the trade for strength. All mere knots are a trade off between strength and "untieability", if you're never intending to untie the knot you never ...


22

The only way I know of would to be to cut a small section off of one of the ends and then dissect it. Inside of the sheath next to the core strands should be a tracer thread and identification tape, During the braiding process, an identification tape and tracer thread indicating the year of manufacture are woven into the rope core. The year of ...


20

TLDR: Because its much harder that way and the extra altitude of the Himalayas makes it that much more difficult. Alpine style refers to mountaineering in a self-sufficient manner, thereby carrying all of one's food, shelter, equipment, etc. as one climbs, as opposed to expedition style (or siege style) mountaineering which involves setting up a fixed ...


15

Categorically, no. 1) As ab2 said, you need experience. You need to learn how much you can do (note that hiking endurance isn't very related to how one performs in sports--my nephew is 10 years younger than I am, plays multiple sports frequently but I, who have never played sports, can go much farther than he can) and how you handle altitude. I ...


14

Every time a climber finds a way to place more fingers on a hold, he/she will. If he/she is not using all fingers, it's because: They're training their fingers to get stronger, It's impossible to place more fingers on the hold, They have injured fingers they do not want to use and worsen, They're careless because the route is too easy for them.


13

For easy climbs you have quite a good chance to be OK with hiking shoes. The most important property for a shoe to be usable for climbing is, that you have to be able to stand on contact points so small that only a part of your toes' length fits on them. To achieve that, you have basically two possibilities: You take a flexible, very tightly fitting shoe ...


12

The simple way is to pass one of the carabiners through the other, then clip that carabiner to the slings on the other side. Finally, you pull both carabiners tight to dress the whole thing. To undo , you unclip any two of the strands from one carabiner and pull. This can be useful because you can reach up, clip in with one carabiner, undo two strands ...


12

Special devices: @imsodin is right in suggesting a GriGri. For the method: The common trick is to have two "belayers." One attaches the GriGri on their harness as usual. The second person stands facing the primary belayer and pulls hand over hand on the rope (essentially pulling away from the primary belayer, through the GriGri). The primary belayer can ...


12

When racking up, you have a spectrum of possibilities between two extremes: At one end, you could put every single piece of gear on the same carabiner. While the weight savings would be incredible, it would be an absolute pain to place a piece. At the opposite end, you could rack every single piece of pro on its own carabiner. You pay a penalty in weight (...


11

alpine style remains relatively rare in the Himalayas Actually, as far as I can tell from the current climbing literature, alpine style climbs in the Himalaya are relatively common these days. Expedition style climbs (at least the only ones that attract any attention) are now mostly for paying customers with guides. I suspect there are also still private ...


10

In case of the double bowline it gets undone more easily than with a small eye, as it can move more. For the figure of eight the only factor I can think of is the same as with a too long loose end: If you clip in a hurry and the express is rather low, it can happen that you clip the wrong strand. That might seem unlikely, but given enough time/repetitions, ...


10

Even though you say cost is not a primary factor, I still think it's good to be aware of this point when buying your first climbing shoes when mainly used in gyms (I wasn't aware at the time :) ): This won't be your last pair of climbing shoes, you'll need new ones quite soon due to the sole wearing through. Therefore you don't need to get the perfect ...


9

Retire that sling. Use it for some handicraft work at home or similar. Firstly: If in doubt about a piece of gear, don't entrust your live to it. Doing a more detailed analysis without seeing it in real live is hard, but here are two arguments apart from the doubt one (which is enough) that come to mind: It looks like there is a discoloration right on ...


9

All answers will always veer on the side of speculation, but there are a few points which make a likely candidate for this specific case: The Nose is on south-facing El Cap, directly in the sun; November air temperatures in Yosemite are between 57°F(14°C) maximum to 30°F(-1°C) minimum; This climb was done in 2 hours 36 minutes. The most logical conclusion ...


9

Short roping is a technique that is mainly used by mountain guides to get people up a mountain without the need for a time consuming proper belay. The whole concept of short roping is not to catch a fall but to avoid a stumble escalating into a fall. As such short roping is a dangerous technique because only "under ideal circumstances it is possible to hold ...


9

When you fall into the water with a regular chalk bag, it will get too wet to be used. Some solutions to this include, Using liquid chalk, it supposed to stick for longer and you can spread extra on your forearms/legs to rechalk up. Multiple chalkbags/extra chalk so that while one bag dries out you can use a new one. Leaving the bags in the boat and using ...


9

In aid climbing this is still sending since hanging on protection is part of the game (as @StrongBad points out, hanging on the rope is a little different than hanging on protection.) In sport climbing, however, there is no specific word or phrase. I think the most common ways to describe it are: Projecting As in "I'm projecting Era Vella 9a." This doesn'...


9

I think it is easiest to understand if you think about a small pocket where you can fit a single finger in deeply and securely or jam two fingers in poorly. While it is always nice to distribute the weight between two fingers instead of one finger, sometimes the grip you get on a hold is much better with one finger than with two fingers. For the hold shown ...


8

As other people already have mentioned here. In general, it is a disadvantage to be tall. If you look at height-performance profiles in rock climbing, they are generally downward-sloping (meaning the taller you are, the lower you performance on average). See the following graph I created (the first graph look at male climbers while the second considers ...


8

Does it make sense to train rock climbing wearying a weight vest... ? To expand a bit on what Jan said: it depends on why you're training. Back when I was a solid gym rat, some of my climbing was to learn technique. Some was to build strength. Some was to practice. Some was for flexibility. Some was to build endurance. The more hard core folks that ...


8

Generally speaking, newer shoes are going to be better and more effective and yet as you well know that costs money. So what it really comes down is a cost/benefit analysis that's going to be up to the individual. If it gets to a point where you are slipping and the shoes are falling apart at the seams then it becomes a safety issue, short of that its just ...


8

Ascending a fixed rope using an ATC guide in lead mode is totally valid, but it is not the "quickest" method (IMHO). Usually what is taught in basic climbing and self rescue courses is to ascend with two prusik loops: One for you foot, and one for your weight. Ascending with an ATC is ok because it is more "fail proof", though. The reason I mentioned using ...


7

As a peakbagger, I often have that sort of conversation. First you need to define your terms. What constitutes a mountain, a summit, a high point - all those matter. I have "climbed" high points in farm fields that are on such flat areas that we can't even know for certain where it's actually highest. That's why I'm very bored by the idea of county or state ...


7

Climbers in a climbing gym may not necesserily be training for climbing natural rocks - some are probably just training to become better at indoor climbing, or are doing it for recreation alone. Some people probably do not want to be encumbered with their outdoor climbing gear. They might figure that as long as there are still some routes left in the gym ...


7

According to the diagram in the instruction manual, that is called a braking notch and the only mention is If the rope is inserted incorrectly into the Click Up i.e. not following the indications marked on the device (Fig. 3.5) or the Click Up is inserted upside down onto the harness’s belay loop so that the design with the hand and the rope is visible ...


6

You should worry about the opposite: An overhand knot on nylon webbing will get really tight and hard to undo once no longer in use. That's why I rather use a figure-eight in this scenario (double bowline would be even better for undoing, but a bit more cumbersome to tie). This setup is somewhat standard practice for abseiling here in Switzerland, where you ...


6

Anything that needs to be accessed quickly needs to go on your harness, this would include, Belay devices. Personal clip in gear. A couple of slings and carabiners Beyond that, you can sling your alpine draws over one shoulder, along with doubled up cordelettes, and if you use a gear sling, then you can place your extra cams and gear on that. If you are ...


6

Tragically those specific climbers are deceased. I read some of Dean Potter's climbing journals and articles, and didn't find a mention of which specific sunscreen or other products he used. What I'm suggesting is purely from a online research, and reports from athletes who have used it. There's a thick white lotion used by mountain climbers, other ...


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