39

In the end I have contacted the manufacturer, and received a detailed answer surprisingly quickly. So turns out, that the last 2 digits of the batch number are the year of manufacture. E.g. ABCD987612 --> Year of manufacture is 2012. Additional useful information from the e-mail: The potential lifetime of this product in use is 10 years. Attention: ...


23

The absolute strongest? That would be an eye splice. It's the most effective and strongest form of making an eye in a rope and it's what the thimbles are designed to work with. It's nigh on permanent, but that's the trade for strength. All mere knots are a trade off between strength and "untieability", if you're never intending to untie the knot you never ...


23

You probably should not use it any more. Old ropes seem to be surprisingly strong. A German mountaineering magazine made tests with old ropes. Of 14 tested ropes, 10 would still have been strong enough to lead on them without risk. However, these were unused or only little used ropes. The results may differ for ropes that have been used very often or have ...


22

The only way I know of would to be to cut a small section off of one of the ends and then dissect it. Inside of the sheath next to the core strands should be a tracer thread and identification tape, During the braiding process, an identification tape and tracer thread indicating the year of manufacture are woven into the rope core. The year of ...


16

Every time a climber finds a way to place more fingers on a hold, he/she will. If he/she is not using all fingers, it's because: They're training their fingers to get stronger, It's impossible to place more fingers on the hold, They have injured fingers they do not want to use and worsen, They're careless because the route is too easy for them.


16

To me, and I'm no climber, this is about outdoor activities in general. You could equally ask why people kayak in the wilds rather than going to the artificial whitewater centre that's always reliable, or why I spent all of yesterday cycling through headwinds and a hailstorm rather than sitting on a spin bike in the gym for 12 hours. For many of us there ...


15

This touches quite a lot of different dimensions so it will be hard to answer everything in a single post. One of the appeals of climbing outdoors is that it is outdoors. Consider a nice sunny day in spring. Would you rather climb in a crowded, loud and dusty gym without much daylight or outside in the warm sun? For me, the choice is quite clear. (This is ...


12

Special devices: @imsodin is right in suggesting a GriGri. For the method: The common trick is to have two "belayers." One attaches the GriGri on their harness as usual. The second person stands facing the primary belayer and pulls hand over hand on the rope (essentially pulling away from the primary belayer, through the GriGri). The primary belayer can ...


12

When racking up, you have a spectrum of possibilities between two extremes: At one end, you could put every single piece of gear on the same carabiner. While the weight savings would be incredible, it would be an absolute pain to place a piece. At the opposite end, you could rack every single piece of pro on its own carabiner. You pay a penalty in weight (...


12

No, it’s not worth the risk. Ropes aren’t that expensive and if it breaks you could hurt yourself.


11

I think it is easiest to understand if you think about a small pocket where you can fit a single finger in deeply and securely or jam two fingers in poorly. While it is always nice to distribute the weight between two fingers instead of one finger, sometimes the grip you get on a hold is much better with one finger than with two fingers. For the hold shown ...


11

Mainly a gym climber here as well, no lengths just bouldering. Some reasons why outdoor climbing is appealing to me and others I climb with; most of these are obviously about personal preferences of course, so YMMV: It's outdoors, some people like spending time outdoors. More often than not boulders are located in nice scenery, really 'in nature'. Most gyms ...


10

In case of the double bowline it gets undone more easily than with a small eye, as it can move more. For the figure of eight the only factor I can think of is the same as with a too long loose end: If you clip in a hurry and the express is rather low, it can happen that you clip the wrong strand. That might seem unlikely, but given enough time/repetitions, ...


10

Even though you say cost is not a primary factor, I still think it's good to be aware of this point when buying your first climbing shoes when mainly used in gyms (I wasn't aware at the time :) ): This won't be your last pair of climbing shoes, you'll need new ones quite soon due to the sole wearing through. Therefore you don't need to get the perfect ...


9

All answers will always veer on the side of speculation, but there are a few points which make a likely candidate for this specific case: The Nose is on south-facing El Cap, directly in the sun; November air temperatures in Yosemite are between 57°F(14°C) maximum to 30°F(-1°C) minimum; This climb was done in 2 hours 36 minutes. The most logical conclusion ...


9

When you fall into the water with a regular chalk bag, it will get too wet to be used. Some solutions to this include, Using liquid chalk, it supposed to stick for longer and you can spread extra on your forearms/legs to rechalk up. Multiple chalkbags/extra chalk so that while one bag dries out you can use a new one. Leaving the bags in the boat and using ...


9

Short roping is a technique that is mainly used by mountain guides to get people up a mountain without the need for a time consuming proper belay. The whole concept of short roping is not to catch a fall but to avoid a stumble escalating into a fall. As such short roping is a dangerous technique because only "under ideal circumstances it is possible to hold ...


9

In aid climbing this is still sending since hanging on protection is part of the game (as @StrongBad points out, hanging on the rope is a little different than hanging on protection.) In sport climbing, however, there is no specific word or phrase. I think the most common ways to describe it are: Projecting As in "I'm projecting Era Vella 9a." This doesn'...


8

Ascending a fixed rope using an ATC guide in lead mode is totally valid, but it is not the "quickest" method (IMHO). Usually what is taught in basic climbing and self rescue courses is to ascend with two prusik loops: One for you foot, and one for your weight. Ascending with an ATC is ok because it is more "fail proof", though. The reason I mentioned using ...


8

Generally speaking, newer shoes are going to be better and more effective and yet as you well know that costs money. So what it really comes down is a cost/benefit analysis that's going to be up to the individual. If it gets to a point where you are slipping and the shoes are falling apart at the seams then it becomes a safety issue, short of that its just ...


8

Full body harnesses are not used because of: Weight (for obvious reasons) Bulk (Getting all gear to your climbing desintation can be a chore. Everything else being equal, a more packable harness is preferred) Freedom of movement (a full body harness hinders arm movements) Clothing (Taking a jacket on and off with a body harness is a mess) Instead, ...


8

Professional use These devices are intended for professional rope work. When doing rope access work, there are typically two ropes involved. One is the working line which is loaded with the worker's weight. The second rope is a backup line which is only loaded in case the working line fails. An arrester device is running along on the backup rope and moving ...


7

According to the diagram in the instruction manual, that is called a braking notch and the only mention is If the rope is inserted incorrectly into the Click Up i.e. not following the indications marked on the device (Fig. 3.5) or the Click Up is inserted upside down onto the harness’s belay loop so that the design with the hand and the rope is visible ...


7

One key aspect that has not been mentioned: routefinding indors is almost trivial, outdoors it becomes a real challenge and makes climbing a much more creative experience. In the gym, hold color (or tape) tells you exactly what features "exist" that you could use to proceed, and the number you can reach at a given point is usually small, half a dozen at ...


7

In his book "The Push" he describes this a bit. Most of the time they were using a running belay which means they were climbing at the same time with some pieces of protection in between them to avoid a deadly fall. This technique allows to climb very long "pitches" with a normal length rope. Once the leader runs out of gear, he makes a belay and belays the ...


6

Short roping is dangerous, but a critical part of guiding. See my answer here: Is "Short roping" "Death Roping"? That said, the premise of your question is wrong. Being somewhat of a hyper aware chap, the idea of having my fate dependent on the concentration/shore-footedness of a fellow novice whom I've known for 3 days makes me ...


6

I'd very much recommend using a GriGri or one of the newer device with the same mechanism. Reason being, the braking mechanism is not dependent on the position of the braking hand. Thus you can pull in rope in whatever way you want, as long as you have the braking strand in any of your hands at any point it's safe. This removes a lot of the stress as ...


6

There are several scenarios but they all boil down to not using the brake hand but instead hoping the device will catch or improperly sized ropes. 1) with super-skinny ropes; 2) an extremely light climber; 3) routes with bulges or significant rope drag that reduce the forces of a fall; and 4) hanging on the rope (versus falling) mid-...


6

I would definitely discourage this. Accidentially releasing the device is dangerous and can lead to fatal incidents. Moreover, releasing the device is rarely needed to my experience. Therefore this does not make the risk any more acceptable. An engaged ATC in guidemode can easily be released by hooking a carabiner into the little hole at the front and ...


5

Whether a rounded edge is a problem strongly depends on your climbing level. In my experience, for normal people this is not much of an issue as footholds are big enough to step even with a rounded edge, especially on plastic. Adam Ondra on the other side stated in this weeks video that he used 7 pairs of shoes on the dawn wall as holds are so small. I ...


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