14

There are two factors to care about here: a static rope and a rope that is slightly too thick. Static ropes are usually less flexible than dynamic rope, which would explain the stubborn feeling. 0.5mm of thickness is generally nothing to worry about. The main concerns with the manufacturer-approved ranges of rope thickness are safety and "user ...


13

P.S.: I just noticed the question explicitly said indoors! My answer ended up being considerably more general than required... But well, the logic is the same as in case (a): Indoors the bolts are really close, so you should climb (or downclimb) to the nearest one and attach yourself to the fixed quickdraw using the harness belay loop. Both options you ...


9

A rope running across the rotating sleeve of a twist-lock gate can open the karabiner. Background There are different types of locking gates on karabiners: Screw gates: These have a threaded sleeve which is screwed manually to lock the gate. Twist-lock gates: These lock automatically when closed, and need a quarter-twist to unlock Triple-lock gates: These ...


7

I've been thinking if it is possible to achieve anything (worthy of mention) for someone who started at [36] Lee Sheftel started climbing at 33, climbed 5.14a at 59 and 5.13b at 68 Margarita Martinez started at 34, climbed 5.13d at 58 Akira Waku started at 35, climbed V15/16 at 48 Juichi Ogawa started at ~47, climbs 5.12d at 72, was better at 69 Are these &...


7

The Yosemite bowline is just a simple bowline with a Yosemite finish. This finish can also be used with other knots, such as the figure 8. It is fail-proof for the figure 8 case, meaning that if you make it wrong the knot will compensate your mistake by tightening the rope on the correct spots. It is not fail-proof when used together with the bowline, as can ...


6

I did not look whether such a study exist, but I want to reason why it's futile to conduct such a study. Rock climbing performance depends way less on finger strength than most people assume (especially the pinky). To quote the teaching material of the german alpine club, a climbers' performance depends not only on physical precondition, but to a large ...


4

I made a video about it like 2 years ago: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zeU8x7OmxoQ With a FPV of tying the knot. Also be noted that the bowline paper has been updated and there's one more variation in there that is safe for climbing called "Harry Butlers Yosemite Bowline" which has been my default go-to lead climbing knot for the past 2 years, i ...


4

You can bolt the holds onto a (strong) wooden plank and use a ratchet lashing strap to attach the plank to the tree. Better yet: use two. One at the top of the plank and one at the bottom. You will probably want to add some padding to protect the tree. You can place a rubbery "block" on the plank at the places where you put the strap. This way the thing ...


3

Whatever you use could have some impact on the tree, but your best bet is likely to be a combination of slings, either tightly round the trunk to hang handholds from, or alternatively, ropes from your lowest branches to take the weight, with slings round the trunk solely for locating the handholds. On a slight tack, you could use a cargo net or knotted rope ...


3

Probably yes and no. A high friction sole may be very useful on slabs (and in modern bouldering competitions even overhangs are made slabby by adding an outrageous amount of big volumes) but they are pretty much useless in steep terrain with small edges as footholds. So the effect is very different depending on the terrain. Competitions surely would be ...


3

There is a combination of factors: holds get extremely small on a vertical face or slab with higher grades. Holds on overhanging boulders are already quite small in those grades, so they are pretty much nonexistent for vertical climbs as the holds are basically nonexistent, these climbs start to get very friction dependent. This is a problem if you do not ...


2

Those look like tears to me. Something is causing a weak spot, perhaps a sharp point you stand on on of your regular climbs, then failure along stress lines to the toe. It's possible that the resole is not as strong as the original sole. If the damage correlates to the edges of a pattern in the resole then stress lines would appear. Though both pairs seem ...


2

This is called a cows tail tie in, it's a standard guide technique, and is merely a retraced overhand on a bight.


2

If you're looking for goals then look to the best purpose for climbing "To continually climb better than yourself", obviously while having fun along the way. While others here have mentioned many of the reasons others have become well known for their climbing (while older) one that has been missed is route development. You can scout out, set and ...


2

The more important question, regardless of age, is how much are you willing to sacrifice. The people that push the boundaries are the ones that devote their lives to it. Going to the the gym after work aint good enough, and unless you are a trustafarian, RedBull doesn't sponsor weekend warriors. Of course the low hanging fruit has been eaten, and you are ...


2

Going around a 90-degree corner will produce a force on the bolt 40% greater than the tension in the rope. (I.e., greater by a factor of the square root of 2.) The force on the anchor will be about the same as if there had not been a 90-degree bend, but it will be slightly less because of friction. This is nothing to worry about. The forces generated by ...


1

I don't own a grigri (my instructor taught us that They are the Work of the Devil, are Considered Harmful and should be shunned :)) Your problem seems to be that the method of progress capture you're using, with a Prusik, is awkward and inconvenient. A GriGri is a standard tool for this purpose. And I'm far away from the anchor, I won't be able to reach ...


1

There's nothing inherently dangerous about different types of carabiners, but each type has a specific application. A twist-lock carabiner is not normally used on a climber's rack. Climbers normally carry mostly non-locking carabiners plus a smaller number of screw-gate lockers. The main application I've seen for twist-lock carabiners is in climbing gyms, ...


1

I agree 100% with the answer of @endolith, but will add one point. If doing something "worthy of mention" is of great importance to you, try for an age record or a disability record. People take great pride in being the first X climber to climb Everest, where X ranges from blind to amputee to over N years old to whatever. Maybe you can pick a ...


1

"Make a Dog Lead" has already been said, but I use an ancient carabiner at the other end of the lead to clip it to my belt. This enables hands-free dog walking, which permits me to put my hands in my pockets while out with the dog, Especially good in sub-zero winter conditions. If you haven't got enough dogs, then your local dog pound might appreciate ...


1

I do see a need for a munter hitch. I make an anchor at the bottom like usual. I usually make also an anchor prusik at first bolt, because I think knots as the weakest point of the system, or place it otherwise you will keep rope longer if not fall on knots. Then I tight a prusik on my harness, and climb giving slack through moving the prusik with one hand. ...


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