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The key for cold weather clothing is layers ...some tips (some from experience, some from reading/hearing from others): Use layers, especially on your top body Wear something on your head (you lose a lot of warmth through your head) (moved up by comment of bob) Your body (chest/back) is most important to keep warm Use not thick clothes, but more thin ...


6

Mesh lined running shorts. Roughly equivalent to boxers in coverage. I routinely use these on canoe trips and hiking trips under my wind pants. Morning starts with longs, and as the day warms up, they come off as the day warms up. I often put longs back on immediately on hitting camp for bug protection. That said: From years of outdoor activities, I'm ...


6

One name for it is a Legionnaires Cap or hat.


5

The folks at Smartwool explain why you should not use fabric softener on Merino wool: Machine-wash on gentle cycle in warm or cool water (avoid hot water as heat may shrink wool). Use mild soap, no bleach or fabric softener (bleach destroys the Merino wool fibers, and fabric softener coats those fibers—reducing their ability to naturally manage moisture ...


4

First of all, you shouldn't consider wearing a down jacket under a mostly non-breathable shell. Down loses most of its insulating properties when damp or wet and, assuming strenuous hiking, having it inside your perspiration saturated outer shell will only degrade its performance over the course of your sortie, to the point of becoming almost useless. If ...


4

My configuration in cold weather is: Head: Wool hat when dry, additionally hood from rain jacket when wet. Upper body: Merino wool base layer (not too thick for me because I tend to be warm), maybe another layer of merino wool if it is very cold, down jacket (mostly worn during breaks, otherwise too warm for me), and a proper water and windproof hard shell ...


3

I regularly cycle to the pool with limited time, and have found that the best option is trunks, but they don't have to be as skimpy as we tend to think of as speedos. Mine (similar to these but a little longer) are like close fitting short shorts, and feel much less exposed than some styles. Unpadded cycling shorts would also be good. Unpadded because cheap ...


2

For my few forays into such weather I have worn: Heavy merino wool socks over silk liner socks. Merino wool under my pants. For my upper body I go with layers on the outside rather than anything under my top. I will either wear my puffy vest under a light jacket, or a puffy jacket with a hood. If things get too wet the light jacket gets replaced by my ...


2

SPF and UPF both have very similar purposes. But the are metrics for different things - the first is for rating sunscreen creams, they latter is for apparel. The measurement method is different in both (one measures how much gets through, the other measures how much is filtered out). Sunrays have two types of UV rays (UV-A and UV-B, the former causes ...


1

Commonly cited reasons for washing new clothes, especially those worn next to the skin, are to remove some of the chemicals added (for whatever reason) to the material by the manufacturer -- chemicals that your skin may have an adverse reaction to to remove some of the pathogens that have been deposited on the garment by sick folk trying on the item in the ...


1

Following @csk advice, I washed the mittens in luke-warm water with a little bit of soap and then dried on a rack. I was worried that washing might remove the waterproofing but that was silly: the mittens were soaked through on the first day of actual use and on all the days after that. So even if i had not washed them prior to use, they would have become ...


1

That should work great. As you probably know The G-1000 fabric is a specific cotton-polyester blend. Cotton and polyester will not be damaged by those temperatures. The Greenland wax is made from beeswax and parrafine. Neither will evaporate at those temperatures so your oven won't end up covered in waxy residue. I can think of only two possible problems:...


1

I would try the "flimsy travel hairdryer". It does not take that much heat to melt the wax, just keep it close to the trousers. I got a G1000 hat and once successfully used a burning candle to get the wax in. Just rubbed it on got my hand in the hat and moved it close to the flame. If the wax melts you are good, your hand on the other side of the garment is ...


1

I suspect that sweatshirt fabric has too open a mesh for any waterproofing agent to be effective. Rather than risk a garment you love, buy as close to a similar weight sweatshirt at a thift store, and do your initial experiments with that. I have used linseed oil to add water resistance to canvas goods. Look up "DIY Tin pants" on youtube for other recipes....


1

Even the fastest-drying shorts will not get completely dry in a reasonable amount of time. If the weather is cold enough, wearing damp shorts for the return hike might be dangerous. If that's the case, I suggest using a rain kilt for coverage while changing out of the wet swim trunks. Rain kilts are lightweight (2-3 oz), inexpensive ($10-20), small enough ...


1

A related point that I have not noticed come up yet has less to do with the clothes you take (anything not cotton will do you fine) and more to do with what you do with them. No matter what the material, even synthetics that claim to insulate when wet, will make you cold if you are wearing them wet. The synthetic manufacturers are proud to note that their ...


1

Lots of good info and advice on this thread. I will simply add that regardless of ambient temperature, get yourself a pair of DARN TOUGH SOCKS. I LOVE these socks and they come with a warranty that will knock your socks off. If there is ANY issue with the socks, send them back and they will send a brand new pair, no questions asked.


1

To add to MichelKejzers' and Alexander's answers At 3 - 5 °C while hiking I often wear only a long-sleeve shirt or T-Shirt + thin fleece pollover, if the sun is shining or there isn't much wind or a bit later in winter you may even find me in T-Shirt only. A lot here depends on acclimatization: now being fall, I'm not yet as acclimatized to cool weather as ...


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