8

First, a note on terminology. There are several groups of knots that have a certain what I call topology. When that topology in the rope is tied around a fixed object, the resulting knot has one name, but when turned around that object then tied around the standing end of the rope, it has a different name. Further, some knots can also be used to join ends ...


7

As noted in the last sentence of the question: Animated Knots is not (mainly?) addressing knots in the context of climbing/mountaineering. There is significant difference in types of knot used and purposes between different disciplines (as well as a lot of overlap of course). In this specific case two problems are listed: slipping This isn't a major ...


6

The basic steps are to clip the rope, form a loop with one end, move it around the other end of the cord/rope and clip it into the carabiner again. In the following images, I'm using a somewhat stiff piece of cord and slightly exaggerating some steps to improve visibility. Step 1: Clip the rope into the biner: Step 2: Form a loop on the "back" rope with ...


4

How well this knot is slipping should be dependent on the proportion of the diameter of the rope in relation to the diameter of the pole on which is used (nautical) or the carabiner (in climbing). If you tie a clove hitch around a very big diameter, it slips more easily. A diameter similiar to the rope or even smaller introduces way more friction between the ...


4

I found several videos showing a one-handed clove-hitch without clipping, as I think you want: https://youtu.be/os_tQdhLI9Y?t=200 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8qSoIY6FPc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-4RMnULYIM It looks a little fiddly to me and I'm not sure where this would be needed versus the more common clip and re-clip method anderas ...


1

Looking closely at the photo, the knots are very much different. In the lark's head, the running end is inside the knot; that means, as tension is applied, the knot will tend to tighten on the standing end, making it more secure. The pull of the standing end will tend to pull the knot and the running end into the knot, guaranteeing a tight knot. In the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible