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40

As long as you are okay with grinding your beans at home, why not just make cowboy coffee. Basically you Put your tin cup on the fire/stove and bring the water to a boil Remove the cup from the heat and let the water cool a bit so you don't burn the grounds Stir in the grounds and bring the water back to a simmer being careful not to burn the coffee Remove ...


30

I've used one of these filter holders on top of a thermos, pouring hot water a little at a time. If you don't want to carry a thermos, use a mug. A largish single-walled mug + one of these and a few filters will probably weigh about as much as the coffee grounds.


26

The easiest and most reusable method in my opinion is the Moka Pot. Simply add water and ground beans to the base and heat over a stove or open fire. You end up with espresso in the top compartment. You can now easily regulate strength and temperature by adding hot or cold water. No filters, no bits in the bottom of your cup. Just try not to burn the coffee ...


18

The material in Owlcation, Can Caffeine Kill? How It Impacts Animals, Plants, and the Environment, updated June 23, 2018, suggests that the safest thing to do with coffee grounds, relative to the environment, is to pack them out. Caffeine has a stimulating and apparently not harmful effect on horses, birds, and bees. Caffeine is banned in horse racing and ...


14

I just ran the experiment of making hot coffee with a cotton coffee sock instead of doing my usual cold brew and it works fine. It's almost the same as cowboy coffee but has the advantage of seperating the grounds from the coffee. Place the coffee sock with grounds inside in water that was boiling for a couple of minutes to steep. Remove sock and drink ...


12

My solution is the same arrangement I use at home. I use a Porlex hand grinder to grind the beans, and an Aeropress to do the extraction. The Porlex mini grinder (https://www.porlexgrinders.com/collections/frontpage/products/porlex-mini-grinder) is perfect for a single dose of grounds, and is very compact; although it doesn't have a convenient way of ...


11

The Leave No Trace approach to coffee grounds is to bring them in carefully without spilling them, use them responsibly without making a mess, and take them with you when you leave, together with all your other biodegradable materials. Don't scatter, bury or burn them. In June, 2019, Popular Science magazine published an article based on an interview with ...


8

If you normally have a coffee in the morning then you will be fine with a coffee in the morning out on the trail. It is part of your daily routine. It is useful to have something like red bull or energy drinks in a pack as part of your emergency rations as week. Not for long term but if you need to stretch a few final miles late in the day due to delays it ...


8

I have used a travel coffee plunger with pre-ground coffee. It worked well (I actually prefer plunger coffee to espresso) but after a couple of trips I decided that the extra bulk wasn't worth it for the nice coffee in the morning. Coffee bags are fine for me. I have seen people in huts use travel espresso kits similar to this one from GSI. They all raved ...


8

If you're an espresso purist you could try a minipresso. They're a hand powered esspresso machine. I was introduced to them by a climbing guide who actually climbed with one and brewed up on top of a pitch.


7

Another alternative, similar to cowboy coffee, but a bit more refined is a Turkish style cezve (AKA ibrik). These are usually made of super thin copper and are light enough to pack. For these you use very finely ground coffee, and boil it very gently until it starts to foam. Then you carefully pour off the coffee from the grounds. Turkish coffee is a great ...


6

Well in my personal experience, I've never faced any issue with caffeine while on a trek. As mentioned by Rory, if coffee is a part of your morning ritual, it will not make much of a difference. Too much of caffeine is not good while on treks as it does dehydrate your body. A better substitute would be tea. Usually on higher altitude treks, tea is a beverage ...


5

As long as you can pre-grind the beans, why not make a kind of tea bag with a coffee filter? Measure the appropriate amount of coffee and fold/staple the filter closed around it. Steep for an appropriate amount of time in hot (or cold) water and then burn the waste. It would add negligible weight to your pack and give you pre-measured portions. Cleaner ...


4

As Anger Density recommended I would recommend making a coffee teabag with some coffee filters and floss. This can be done is a couple easy steps: Grind beans Put serving size in coffee filter (enough for a mug or a whole pot) Tie coffee filter at top with floss, put it in a ziploc bag for safekeeping Boil water with camp stove and steep teabag for a ...


4

Similar to @JollyJoker, I tend to make single-cup pour over coffee when backpacking. While I normally buy disposable (read: burnable) single use packs, you can also buy camping specific re-usable pour over contraptions: Ultra-light weight nylon filter which can attach to any cup Less light weight but more sturdy collapsable filter Any of these options are ...


4

From left to right, Nalgene 1 liter bottle, mesh filter, cotton sock filter. Cotton coffee sock, Lighter Folds up really small Harder to clean as the grounds will stick to it and get stuck inside. Can be used with fine coffee grounds. Metal mesh filter Heavier Takes up more room, the easiest way to carry it would be to leave it screwed into the bottle. ...


4

There are various popular beliefs that alcoholic and caffeinated drinks "don't count" for hydration because alcohol and caffeine dehydrate you. In fact, beer consumed in moderation has a hydrating, rather than a dehydrating, effect,[Valtin 2002] and laboratory studies have shown that caffeinated soda is just as hydrating as water, i.e., the diuretic effect ...


2

I drink caffeine in mass quantities. It's hard to find me not drinking a coffee, Coke, or something similar, here in the regular world. But when I'm out in the backcountry, I only rarely drink it. I find that I just don't really need or want it. When I started my hike of the Appalachian Trail I brought a coffee press attachment for my Jetboil and coffee, ...


2

Indonesian "mud" coffee works fine. If coffee beans are ground sufficiently fine, you can just put some together with near-boiling water, stir a bit, wait 3-5 minutes and all of the grounds will sink to the bottom. They really do, if the coffee is ground sufficiently fine. You just need a cup and the hot water to pour into it. I do this every morning, no ...


2

I have an Oomph coffee press. It works very well, and produces very good coffee if you only want one cup at a time. Allegedly it can also be used for drinking out of like a travel mug, but personally I find it leaks a little if I do that, so I just pour it into a regular mug. It's plastic so I'd be worried about its survivability for serious hiking, but ...


2

There is a traditional way of doing it here in the south of Brazil, called "café tropeiro". You heat the water until it boils, then add coffee powder and mix it. The secret is to put some pieces of the burning coal from the fire in the coffee pot, this makes the powder go to the bottom of the pot faster(don't ask me why, but it works), so you can drink the ...


2

There are some collapsible coffee drippers you can get. Don't take so much space, and kind of light-weight. Your milleage may vary.


2

I recently improvised this pour over solution while traveling and it's so simple, light, delicious, compostable and cheap, I've been taking it camping. Bring paper filters and ground coffee, and use a fork, spork or cut a forked twig (which works even better) to keep the filter from collapsing into the cup. Here I doubled the paper filter to make it ...


1

I make camp coffee as follows: I use large tin cans as pots. They can be gotten at any restaurant, cafeteria and hold about 3 quarts. It's quick work to add a wire bail to them. Morning coffee for two: Put about 4 mugs of water into the pot. Sprinkle about 6 tablespoons of coffee grounds on the water. Do NOT stir. Ideally you have a small mountain of ...


1

What I like to do is essentially make little tea bags but with coffee filled with coffee grounds. You take the filters you would normally filter your coffee through, put a little coffee in it and tie it off with a rubber band. When the time comes for them to be used, you warm up some water, and throw it in, then take it out whenever you desire.


1

I recommend either making camp coffee (or cowboy coffee I see it referred to) or bringing an aeropress. They are light, probably around 200 grams and easy to clean and operate. Grind the coffee in advance and store in single serve zip lock bags.


1

Used (spent) coffee grounds contain little to no caffeine (after all, its been extracted into the cup you drank). Depending on the situation, either pack it out, bury, or spread diffusely over a wide area.


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