Hot answers tagged

29

Probably the best thing you can do to acclimate to the cold is to live in it. Yeah, you can say that sounds simple and it may be hard to do, but it's the best way. I live in an area that gets fairly cold in the winter (as much as -40C/F), and I'm used to it. I don't think 27F is cold at all. Many of your suggestions are along this line of thinking, but ...


28

The general rule I use is if your tent needs to be heated to be comfortable, then you're "doing it wrong" and should have gotten a better tent. There isn't really any weather (especially backpacking, where weight matters more than it does when unpacking from a car) where the correct tent and sleeping equipment can't be made pretty cozy. However, "I told ...


21

One thing you can look into are long-legged thermal underwear - this wouldn't effect how you look on the outside as they go under your clothes and create an insulating layer to help keep you warm. Women can get away with this in everyday life with a nice pair of tights. So for city life, as you stated, this should mean no difference in your every day ...


19

I would say there really aren't any. Even a hypothermia patient would get wrapped in a hypo wrap and the stove would be used to boil water to go into Nalgene bottles. The problems with running a heater inside of a tent include, Catching the tent on fire. Carbon monoxide poisoning. There are heaters that are meant for use inside tents, but you are asking ...


18

Was there any logic behind this practice (rubbing frostbite with snow)? Is this method encouraged / discouraged by modern medicine? According to Hypothermia, Frostbite and Other Cold Injuries: Prevention, Survival, Rescue ... By Gordon G. Giesbrecht, James A. Wilkerson, the treatment gained popularity in the Napoleonic Wars because rapid rewarming ...


17

How cold are you talking about? When you woke up, was there ice on your tent? Or was it 50F outside? Anyways, to sum it up, sleeping bags generally boil down to this tradeoff: Pick Two: Warmth, Small Size, Low Cost If you are car camping, you should be able to find sleeping bags that will go down to 15F for $50-$75, but they will occupy well over 40-50 ...


14

For maximum efficiency (i.e. melted water per used fuel) make sure the following things are always true: Always have some water in the pot. Never have only water in the pot. Having water increases the thermal conductivity between the pot and the snow/water. With just snow you have a smaller contact area. As long as there is both snow and water in the pot, ...


10

EDIT: Please also read the other answer, which tells you why wrong (well perhaps not for 100% of the cases=) This is just my experience: I would warm up if I felt cold and had the opportunity to do so. Sure, slowly getting cold again is not comfortable, but staying cold for an even longer time is worse. Another effect that I noticed is that warming up ...


10

Long thick socks will help in 2 ways -- they'll reduce heat loss through your feet/lower calves and reduce draughts up your legs. Even 2 pairs of normal socks would be better than nothing. There are special thermal socks (sold as heat-holders for example) but they may not fit in your shoes. This could be regarded as in addition to thermal underwear. If it'...


10

I am not sure why you want to do this, but I have noticed that in a group of people in cool (not cold) weather eg 5 C which is 41 F, those who live in places with a very cold winter (rural Ontario like me, Winnipeg) are not even zipping up their coats while those who live in year-round warm places (Texas) are shivering and complaining and borrowing gloves. ...


10

That lean-to in the link looks like it would shelter from all but the most wind driven rain. If you pack a cheap vinyl poncho that should take care of most situations. They are light enough that you can pack a second. What is the temperature rating on your sleeping bag? 15F/-10C will probably be more than warm enough. If you are carrying a summer bag, you ...


10

This question seems dead, but I felt I had to chime in here. As a specialist expeditioner of Arctic regions as a photographer, sometimes heating a tent becomes a necessity over time. Damp boot liners and gloves can give you frostbite in a hurry under certain conditions, and I have found it one of the most critical things to get them dry for a few hours in ...


9

IMO you totally don't need a tent. Plenty of people, including me, prefer to sleep out under the stars even if there's no hut. It can be difficult to sleep with a wind blowing across one's face, but that won't be happening inside the hut. It's also off the ground, so you won't be losing heat into the dirt. Yes, the temperature inside will be the same as ...


9

I'm going to assume and interpret a little, and forgive me please if I put words in your mouth. What you really seem to be asking is: "Do I have to spend mad cash to stay warm?" I would say, in 50F (10C), certainly not! With each item, I give my "cheap", and "good but costly" options (I have no associations with any company) Make sure you have a ground ...


9

A sleeping bag is like any other purchase, you'll get exactly what you pay for! Unfortunately, sleeping bags are used in many different situations/climates. A sleeping bag you carry and use in the summer months when the lower temperatures are 60 or 70 degrees at night, won't begin to work when you camp in the fall/winter/spring and the temperature lows are ...


9

TLDR: -148 °F including windchill has been survived inside of a snowcave. I went looking for cases of people surviving extremely low temperatures while inside a snow caves, and it looks like the record is held by the climbers who did the first winter ascent on Denali. On February 28, 1967, Dave Johnston, Art Davidson, and Ray Genet became the first ...


8

I think part of what is missing in your question and the answer by flawr is core body temperature. When you first get cold your body automatically shunts blood away from the surface of your skin to decrease heat loss. As you get colder your core body temperature falls (you could think of it like the cold sinking in, but that is not literally true). When ...


8

Assuming you do not count putting a hot water bottle in a sleeping bag as heating a tent (although it will eventually heat the tent), it only makes sense to intentionally heat a back packing tent if three conditions are met. You need extra heat. There is no reason to heat a tent if it is already hot outside You have a form of heat for which the risks from ...


7

Many adventurers have a stove on them, though not necessarily for the purpose you describe. From "Obtaining Water from Snow and Ice" by Dryad (who offer bushcraft and wilderness courses: Most mountaineers, and explorers travelling in cold environments, carry modern stoves which use liquid fuels such as Unleaded Petrol, Propane Gas, or Coleman fuel in ...


7

Acclimatization isn't purely psychological; it is actually a physiologically different response based upon recent exposure and experience. Layering down over a period of time (days to weeks) could theoretically alter your biochemistry on a cellular level as you develop a different proportion of membrane proteins and salinity (see http://en.wikipedia.org/...


6

You could do worse than to research Wim Hof, his accomplishments, and his training methods. TEDx Amsterdam video YouTube channel Daredevils show featuring Wim Hof Have fun. :o)


6

Your criteria: a full day with a decent chunk of inactivity, cold but not frigid, with some precipitation. Normally when active outdoors in such weather I wear softshell pants (schoeller-type fabrics, such as Arc'teryx Gamma LT or Marmot Scree pants) and a lightweight or silkweight baselayer. This provides wind and water resistance, won't make me overheat, ...


6

Another option is flannel-lined jeans. I find them more comfortable and simple than thermal underwear, and they are very warm in the winter. You also have the option of adding the thermal underwear if you are still too cold. What kind to get is a matter of personal preference, and what kind of jeans you would typically wear. Amazon lists a selection of many ...


5

You could try wearing a pair of sweats under your pants. I've done that before, and was quite warm, and comfortable. Pajamas are also an option.


5

A hut like this should at least be dry and reasonably sheltered so you might get draughts but not direct driving winds. This means that you can afford to focus on warmth rather than more general shelter if you are confident that you can reach a hut every night. In this sort of context down sleeping bags are attractive as they offer excellent warmth and ...


5

From an ad for the book on the website of the AMC Store: In 1967, eight men attempted the first winter ascent of Mount McKinley, now known as Denali. They faced winds in excess of 150 miles per hour and temperatures more than fifty below zero. The windchill temperature reached –148°. Three team members reached the summit only to be trapped at more ...


4

When we get cold vasoconstriction occurs. This prevents the blood at the extremities being subject to heat conduction away from the body. This is not an adaption, this is a reaction. The body emits heat all the time because the body working and but wants to remain at constant temperature. If the ambient temperature is such that we can lose this heat, we ...


4

For a lean-to: Sleeping bag - And other sleeping items for warmth. Ground pad - The floor of the lean-to will chill you almost as quickly as the ground. Also it protects your sleeping bag from dirt, etc. A tarp - This is for hanging across the door if needed to block wind and/or precipitation.


4

After reading the "you're doing it wrong if you need to" I'll take a contrarian view: I've camped several times using an outfitter's tent -- canvas walled, barely liftable dry, and barely dragable wet. These are often equipped with an non-flammable thimble for use with a wood burning stove. What conditions have I used these: Hunting. If you have been ...


3

You could wear clothes that cover up your chest portion and if you cover up chest portion then it will be warm.Chest is the most sensitive part to sense cold.So cover up your chest as much as possible.Apart from this you can wear socks that are not made up of cotton but maybe wool or any other.Then for body warner or sweater or thick jacket and thermal inner ...


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