17

Probably a woodlouse which is a type of crustacean in the suborder Oniscidea. Source: a-z animals They are globally distributed, except in polar regions and arid deserts, and are also known by the following names: "armadillo bug" "boat-builder" (Newfoundland, Canada) "butcher boy" or "butchy boy" (Australia,mostly around Melbourne) "carpenter" ...


9

Note: This answer has been revised based on a higher quality photo I am not a toad expert, but I think it is likely a Woodhouse's Toad based on this handy guide. One of the key features is the pale stripe down the back and the cranial crests; the absence of which would make it a Boreal Toad or the large symmetrical dark splotches that would make it a Great ...


9

In my experience, most of the trailheads in the Boulder, RMNP area are accessible to little cars almost the whole time they are open. I'm not saying all are, but most. That said, you could easily go three ways with the choice of vehicle: AWD, little clearance -- Something like a Subaru will get you to almost all the trailheads that are open almost all the ...


8

There are many trails and therefore many trailheads with a variety of road types leading to them. Most of the roads in Rocky Mountain National Park can be traveled by ordinary passenger cars, at least when it's not snowy. The roads in the nearby national forests vary widely. The main forest roads can be traveled by ordinary passenger car, but a more ...


8

There isn't necessarily a way to prepare your body for the altitude. You should however: Be in good condition overall, i.e. able to handle at sea level more than you are planning to do at altitude. Try to spend several days at a lower altitude (like 7000 feet) doing some aerobic activity before trying to go higher. Drink more water than usual. Take regular ...


7

[Edited after comments and additional research.] Aerobic training will not prepare you for altitude Some of the answers here are misleading. According to the Altitude Research Centre: Being physically fit does not prevent you from experiencing AMS (Acute Mountain Sickness) symptoms. There does not seem to be a link between fitness level and ...


7

I see these everywhere where I live (Central Texas). We usually call them "pill bugs" or "rollie-polies" (usu. young children). It shouldn't do you or anything you own any harm; they mostly just crawl around on things and roll up into a ball when you touch them. Kids would always run around collecting them when I was in school.


5

Definitely a wolf spider (i.e., family Lycosidae). Possibly Hogna frondicola or some closely related species. Source: Spiderid.com The white ball is an egg sac. From Wikipedia: wolf spiders carry their egg sacs by attaching them to their spinnerets. You can see similar pictures to your of wolf spiders carrying egg sacs here and here. Source: ...


5

Find an area with a large stairway (football field bleachers work great), then power-walk/run up and down them while taking a break every few runs. Keep doing this until the trip, while increasing the number of "laps" when you think you're improving. When it starts becoming easier, pack up your backpack with your gear or simulate the weight with something ...


5

Our crew deviated to Lost Creek Wilderness SW of Denver and Maroon Bells - Snowmass Wilderness near Aspen (bear canisters required, which they picked up at an REI on the way). The only issue they had was the Scouts had bags good enough for Philmont (40F) but not higher elevations, but the leader didn't discover this until they were already at Maroon Bells. ...


3

In over 40 years of getting to trailheads across the US, I've used a variety of vehicles. (1) Classic 1970's era rear wheel drive US-made station wagons. These sufficed to get a load of people and gear up forest roads in good road conditions (no major ruts, some washboarding) and good weather conditions (mainly summers, no thick layers of mud). Examples ...


3

AWD (All Wheel Drive) is available in many small cars and 'cross over' vehicles. You don't need to choose an SUV to have it. Note that Four Wheel Drive (4WD or 4X4) is different then AWD. If you don't know which you need, than choose AWD. (Why would be a separate question and answer) Think of it like the difference between manual and automatic ...


3

I'm not 100%, but I am going to call that a yellow striped armyworm, Spodoptera ornithogalli. These things seem to be widely distributed and very common; I've seen them frequently in my travels but never bothered to look it up until today. Here's some additional, more close-up images for comparison: Here's what it becomes as an adult:


3

Altitude adjustment is primarily conditioned through acclimation. Remember to travel high, sleep low. If you can, go earlier and spend some time acclimating to the higher altitude by going up to a higher altitude and then descending after a period of time. Perhaps a couple hours at the higher altitude before descending to a somewhat lower altitude. From what ...


2

These are not blueberry - the leaves would be smooth and the fruits would be covered in a pale whiteish wax bloom. Although they do look very similar to blueberry in the washed fruit form as you might buy at the supermarket. However, good news - these are most likely Serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia). Also known as Saskatoon (after which the Canadian ...


2

This is a terrestrial isopod crustacean called a woodlouse (colloquially referred to as pill bugs, potato bugs, roly-pollies, sow bugs, etc.). There are over 5000 species in the world with at least 64 in Russia (see Kuznetsova & Gongalsky 2012). Habitat: Woodlice are typically found in damp, dark places -- in the soil, under rocks/logs/debris, etc. ...


2

I've never been to RMNP in the winter, so this is a wild guess. I'm assuming the higher elevation roads will all be closed. Look into how far you can drive up Fall River Road. If I remember right, it's about 10 miles long. The eastern 3/4 or so goes up a valley. While there is certainly elevation gain, it doesn't sound like what you are looking for. ...


2

If you're hiking in and around Boulder, you don't need anything special for a car. If you live near a bus route, there are routes that can take you to the edge of the city and within 15 minutes easy walk of the trailheads at Boulder Chautauqua , which are all great day hikes on their own. Off the top of my head and experience (I live in Boulder), You won't ...


2

Steamboat has some very nice tree skiing. In general open tree skiing in Colorado involves finding an aspen or similar hardwood grove and those don't occur at the very highest elevations. So as a rough first guess, I'd look for resorts at similar elevations to Steamboat. I can't think of any similar evergreen groves like those at Heavenly, but it has been ...


2

It probably was, as 50 lbs is way beyond the size at which they are weaned. However, mountain lion cubs will stay with the mom for up to 18 months. Female cougars probably begin leading their kittens to kills as early as 7 to 8 weeks. The mother also carries meat to her young from kills until weaning age (2 to 3 months), at which point the cubs weigh in ...


2

I have been an obsessive eastern peakbagger for almost a decade. That means a lot of the summits my partners and I now visit are lost extremely deep in the woods of Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Quebec. Most of the summits I now climb are bushwhacks the entire way from the trailhead, and those trailheads are often along logging roads and trails that can ...


2

You did not mention what you planned on doing. Was it strictly backpacking in the backcountry? One option would be Whittington Center which is near Philmont. There is hiking and camping in basically the same sort of environment though I'm not sure it would be enough backcountry for you. The other option is heading north from Denver. Just about all of ...


1

Here are some points of interest you should definitely include, based on your rough proposed area: Arches National Monument. It's at least worth a day trip thru there. There are some natural arches in other places in the general region, but there is nothing like Arches. Bryce Canyon. The highest concentration of the best hoodoos anywhere. It's also a ...


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