48

Technically, according to Leave No Trace principles you should leave everything as you find it. Two other related principles would be travel on durable surfaces and respect wildlife. As you intimated, fewer rocks on the trail could perhaps make it less durable and more susceptible to erosion. Obviously throwing rocks directly at an animal (unless for ...


33

I'll answer this from a perspective of what we follow in some of the areca nut and coconut farms that I've grown up in. The areca nut and coconut trees shed their branches often. These are similar to the dead wood that you are speaking of in the woods. These too are a nuisance when it comes to walking around. So what we do is to move these to the base of ...


32

Nature is not static, it is always in motion. Let's look at two extremes. A small pothole full of water on the trail can be completely filled with a couple of handfuls of gravel. Expand this to a small pond at a park and have daily visitors tossing gravel from the path in to the pond, and soon the pond is gone (the path will need fresh gravel as well). ...


31

You could ask what the importance is of any species or related group of animals. They all have their place in the ecosystem, and there will be consequences when any of them disappear. In the particular case of bats, they are quite beneficial to humans. They eat a good fraction of their body weight in flying insects every night. They are also the only ...


19

Bats eat hundreds of mosquitos per bat every night, which is amazing for human peoples and the principle reason people hang up special made bat houses. Bat guano (poop) also creates habitats for other species. There are entire ecosystems in caves that exist only because of bats. In those ecosystems bats are the only creatures leaving the deep dark regions of ...


18

I personally would rather just set an action camera to record over the timespan the litterer usually comes by. Consumer trail cameras don't usually have great definition - worse than action cameras anyway - and the tossing might go unnoticed while with video, you'll grab several frames per second. You could be able to get the car, the littering, and the ...


16

Yes, this should work, trail cameras are used quite frequently to catch people littering. We know this because a hidden camera caught it all on tape. Juneau police used the footage to find the woman, Janessa Sanbei, and fine her for littering -- one of five tickets issued this spring after the installation of surveillance cameras at popular illegal ...


14

The answer seems to be that it depends, Birds, small mammals, and other wildlife use snags for nests, nurseries, storage areas, foraging, roosting, and perching. Live trees with snag-like features, such as hollow trunks, excavated cavities, and dead branches can provide similar wildlife value. Snags occurring along streams and shorelines eventually may ...


14

The first difficulty is technical: keeping such food dry requires a moisture barrier, or it will absorb water from the air. There aren't many materials that will do that, and biodegradable plastics, or the waxes in waxed paper, don't biodegrade very well (if at all on the ground). Other degradable plastics won't last the expected long shelf life. That's not ...


13

The Sea Turtle Conservancy (STC) gives two reasons for keeping beaches dark at night when sea turtles are laying or hatching. The first reason the STC gives is that a nesting turtle likes quiet, dark beaches. If she cannot find such a spot after several attempts, she will choose a less than ideal spot to lay her eggs, and perhaps even lay them in the ocean. ...


12

In a National Park, unless the animal was harmed by a human, it seems like the park service isn't going to do anything. “The rule of thumb is that if human activity causes an animal to become injured or orphaned, we may intervene. If not—if it’s something that happened naturally—then we don’t,” says ecologist Doug Smith, who oversees Yellowstone’s wolf ...


11

The best thing to do would have been not disturb them in the first place, but I do understand the need of this question. So I wouldn't add any advice like "Do not disturb them in the first place". From what I have seen, Buzzards and other raptors (not specifically the ones you mentioned) would return to kill if left alone. But, provided that it is done ...


11

They're part of the ecosystem. If they go away, it creates an imbalance that can't be fixed. Simple example, they eat huge numbers of mosquitoes. Kill the bats, and you free the mosquitoes to multiply as they please.


10

By engaging in winter sports (where there is significant snow on the ground) you are already greatly reducing your impact. The biggest impacts to back-country areas from non-motorized recreation come from vegetation disturbance: boots grinding up plants and breaking topsoil, tents compressing vegetation, camp activity destroying vegetation, fire scars, etc. ...


9

Protected species in sweden are listed in English here: Protected Species in Sweden. Since information is subject to change I will not copy the information into this answer. Apart from that, hunting and fishing is regulated. Naturally, anything grown commercially is off limits too, since that is the property of the land owner. Note that National Parks/...


9

To add to the excellent answers already posted: Bats act as prey for larger birds like hawks, falcons, snakes et al. Bats (the larger ones known as flying foxes) help in seed dispersal as they eat fruits.


9

Basically it's people with large social media followings who use their influence on those platforms, especially Instagram, to influence people to visit outdoor places, buy outdoor things and support outdoor causes. Their Instagrams of beautiful vistas have brought attention to environmental issues — and foot traffic to unspoiled wilderness. According to ...


8

These are mining claim markers that mark the edges of the claim. The ones in the picture are legal, because the tops are capped. If the tops were not capped, it would be legal to pull them out and set them on the ground. 8.  After November 1, 2011, any durable plastic pipe that is not removed pursuant to subsection 7 may be removed and placed on the ...


8

When I've had to clean spray paint from remote destinations, we've used chemical paint removers in spray bottles and scrub brushes. Do not do this on a historic site without permission from whoever manages it. There is a very good chance you will cause at least slight damage while removing the spray paint, and if you are careless, you can make the ...


8

A lower size limit is designed to allow a fish to reach breeding age before it can be taken. An upper size limit is designed to prevent the most effective breeders from being taken. It is based on the fact that in many species a more mature adult will have a larger number of successful offspring, and fish continue to grow throughout their lives. Also, in ...


8

You have heard both answers because both are right depending on the area and ecosystem. Established trails: If there is an established trail going where you need to go, you should stay on it. Even to the point that in a mucky area stay in the tread, rather than create a new trail beside it which might be dry for a while, but will eventually become a new ...


8

There are a number of considerations here, so getting educated is the first step in responding to the Red Eared sliders. There could be positive and negative effects. Contact your local conservation department. They'll know how to proceed. If the species is native, you might want to protect it from domestic animals. On the other hand, if you protect it ...


8

You're building up a huge fire hazard. Normally fires would've cleaned that out, but fire suppression for 40 years has left you with a lot of fuel. Which may make for a really bad fire. Destroying forest, as well as structures. Removing that dead wood will be taking out nutrients from the ecosystem (as well as costly in labor and time). Reducing Fire ...


8

Depending on the species, park rangers and other wildlife officials may be very interested to know that it has been spotted. For example: the monk seal in Hawaii. If found on shore, it is so endangered that a NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) official will come out and set up a perimeter so people won't disturb it until it goes back out ...


7

I will answer in reverse order: (2) the least impact to the stream ecosystem, presuming you intend to cross, is to use the preexisting track. First, this restricts disturbance to an already disturbed place (kind of like walking on the trail, not next to it). Second, you aren't going to need to break ground to another part of the stream, again limiting new ...


7

In certain BC rivers, fishing is catch and release only, it's illegal to fish with anything but a single barbless hook. I have a whole tackle box full of spoons that have been hacked to death by a pair of side cutters in order to make them legal for catch and release. When you hook a fish, reel them in normal, but pick them out of the water with a net, don'...


7

First of all, if you're closer than 30 metres, then you're too close, get a telephoto lens and shoot from far away. If you want to see a moose, then the absolute best way to get a good look is to learn how to hunt the animal. Hunters spend countless hours, days, and sometimes weeks tracking their game before hunting season even starts. They are experts ...


6

There is one often forgotten thing in skiing that can be harmful. The waxes. The racing ones contain a lot of fluorocarbons that can stay in the environment for ages. The pure racing fluorocarbons (mostly powders) are dangerous even to people applying them and special masks should be worn (see). Consider using just pure hydrocarbon waxes or other waxes ...


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