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29

The answer to this is a resounding: No. The main problem with suffocation and cookers is in enclosed spaces where there is no airflow. Suffocation when using a cooker can happen when either the O2 concentration drops below the minimum needed, or when the CO2 (carbon dioxide) or CO (carbon monoxide) concentration rises to a toxic point. In the case of ...


24

I'd try and be more specific towards the kind of the fuel we are talking about: White Gas / Naphtha Burns clean without any smell and/or effect on food taste. Accidental Spilling of the fuel is not much to be worried about. Evaporates very quickly, without leaving an odor. That said, make a note that the spilled fuel is very flammable White gas is safer to ...


21

When I get to the "simmer" part of cooking on the Whisperlite, I take the pot off the stove, put the lid on, and wrap it in a towel including underneath and on top. Whatever I am cooking will stay simmery for at least 20-30 minutes that way. It's great for making a sauce with dehydrated ingredients. While the sauce is sitting aside staying hot, I can cook ...


21

This information is available under the Specs on Jetboil's website. 100g canister: 100g fuel; gross weight 194g; empty weight 94g (51.5% fuel by weight) 230g canister: 230g fuel; gross weight 356g; empty weight 126g (64.6% fuel by weight) 450g canister: 450g fuel; gross weight 645g; empty weight 195g (69.8% fuel by weight)


18

I'll start by saying that it doesn't really matter how cookware material interacts with the human body, because you aren't going to eat your cookware. What is important is how it reacts with the foods that you cook, particularly acidic foods (which is why you don't want to use cast iron to make tomato sauces). In this regard, titanium is as close to perfect ...


17

The short answer: don't. Edit: Instead of simmering on the stove, remove the pot from the flame and keep it insulated to retain heat. See @KateGregory's excellent answer for more details. The long answer: you can reduce the pressure in the fuel bottle, and this will reduce the flow rate of the fuel. This is done by pumping fewer times! The exact number ...


17

Yes boiling water at 70oC will burn you. The above chart is for hot water heater settings and burn/scalding. As you can see from the graph being exposed to 70o C water for about half a second is enough to burn your skin. That isn't a long exposure time. As far as the cold and other factors well that just depends on too many variables. The answer is ...


15

In the article "Is that newfangled cookware safe?" no special mention is made for titanium. Titanium is not commonly found in cookware other than backpacking because it is simply terrible for any cooking tasks other than perhaps boiling water and it is expensive. Many backpackers are willing to pay the extra money for extra weight saving. According to ...


15

This is not a survival technique. The way to determine how many calories is in a particular food item is to measure the amount of heat energy emitted when an item is burned. Anything burned to ash is basically calorie free as far as food value goes. Ash is composed of whatever was unable to vaporize into smoke in a fire. The hotter the fire, the more ...


15

You can cook meat on a wooden skewer, piecing it like a kebab, and turning it frequently to prevent burning and to allow it to cook evenly. Similarly you can do this with two sticks and have the meat tied between the two. This is useful for smaller chunks, but becomes difficult with larger ones. You also will have to take care with dripping fat which can ...


14

If you don't have a scale, you can still figure out roughly how much fuel is in each canister with a simple bowl of water. Drop a full canister in bowl of water and mark the water line. Then, drop an empty one in the bowl of water and mark the water line. This gives you your full and empty lines for reference. Now you can drop each of your partially-full ...


14

For most people to even start considering eating roadkill would mean getting over our personal demon of squeamishness. This thought would not appeal to most. Here are eight (8) important rules to consider before one should eat roadkill. 8 Rules of Roadkill Follow these Roadkill Rules to help determine if food by Ford is safe to swallow. 1. ...


13

I think you mean "light" the fuel. "Lighten" means to reduce it's weight. It seems you want to ignite it. The basic problem is that the vapor pressure of ethanol goes down significantly with cold. Keep in mind that liquid doesn't actually burn, it's the gas the liquid gives off combining with atmospheric oxygen that actually burns. If you have a fuel ...


13

I think you have the right idea. Leave No Trace principles (and wilderness permit regulations in many areas) dictate that washing be done at least 100 feet from camp, trail, or stream. If there's some soil nearby that would be the best spot, because there'll be higher activity from decomposing organisms there which will break down any tiny bits of food you ...


13

I usually don't carry any kind of stove with me when I go hunting - this could be anytime from September to November or in May and early June. The weather can vary wildly during these times and I've experienced every kind of weather, from 10 below (F) and snow, to 30 degrees and freezing rain, to 90 (F) and dry. I found that going without hot food for up ...


13

Stews based on fresh vegetables and pulses (dried or tinned) are as healthy as you like and can be made from only shelf-stable ingredients. With the addition of potatoes or pearl barley you can cook a meal in one pot, over a fire or camping stove without much control. Sauces can be based on beer/wine/tomatoes/coconut milk etc. Rice or pasta on the side, or ...


12

Different gasses have different boiling points. Under boiling point the gas is liquid and doesn't have enough pressure to come out from the canister (if used in upright position). The boiling points of usual gasses used in (camping) gas stoves are: Propane: −42.25 to −42.04 °C Butane: −1 to 1 °C Isobutane: −13 to −9 °C source Wikipedia: Propane, butane ...


12

I'll answer a question in the comments: I will be curious to know what is the average amount of Co2 produced by a stove vs the average amount of co2 generated by human breathing. My guess would be that stove will win but I heard of people suffocate in closed cars while sleeping To make things simple, lets assume assume your body burns 2,600 calories ...


12

I have used hexamine fuel in sub-freezing temperatures before, and my experience is that it works reasonably well if you keep your stove protected from the wind. In cold weather it will take several cubes to get your water boiling. You really need to keep the stove protected from wind, though, even in warm weather, the flame gets blown off pretty easily.


12

I follow a paleotic diet (which is gluten-free) for fairly similar reasons. I will give you some of my recommendations; I have tried them all myself except for the hard boiled eggs: Beef jerky/pemiccan: it is very nutritious. It's my number 1 recommendation for food on the trail (regardless of whether you have celiac disease or not). You can make it ...


12

The standard expedition stove for extreme conditions would be an MSR XGK. You will likely want to bring a pair of them, along with a repair kit, on the assumption that due to the cold or poor quality fuel you'll break a pump or need to make other repairs. Now, you may be thinking "what are all those people doing with canister stoves on Everest/Aconagua/...


12

Here is the list of stuff I would consider taking on longer hikes: trail mix chocolate muesli bars more expensive energy bars are great for really demanding stuff, where energy to weight ratio really counts (e.g. multi pitch climbing). They are also more filling than muesli bars. beef jerky dried sausage vacuum-packed hard cheese peanut butter or nutella ...


11

I use this system exclusively, and there's an entire site dedicated to the variety of ways you can do it. I think it is generally called "freezer bag cooking", and the main site I'm aware of is called TrailCooking. I've always used ziplocks marked as "freezer bags" from the grocery store, but those ones you found seem like they would be perfect. There's ...


11

Make sure your fuel container is not in direct contact with the ground. It'll suck the heat right out of your fuel, reducing vapors. Warm your fuel first (armpits work, closed container obviously) If you are using actual alcohol, you're going to have trouble below freezing. As Olin mentioned, the vapors are what burn, and alcohol just doesn't produce ...


11

Cooking as a large group is bad for a variety of reasons: More work to coordinate roles, responsibilities. Limited cooking resources (stoves, pots, etc.) means waiting, frustration, idleness, or carrying more than one of everything. More likely to waste fuel. Waste of energy/misuse of downtime e.g. Instead of cooking every 3rd day/meal you're cooking every ...


11

When I cook home-dehydrated food, I often rehydrate for a day - but not on the stove. In the morning, I boil water for coffee, pour some over dehydrated meat in a Nalgene, leave the lid on loosely until the water is only warm, then tighten the lid firmly. It spends the day in the pack and by dinner time the meat is rehydrated. For some vegetables, such as ...


11

I like using a soap and sponge, but it's not the only solution. It is possible to cut the weight of a soap and sponge setup pretty significantly. Using a small scrubby like the one shown below works well and is much lighter. You can also take a regular sponge and cut it into a much smaller mini-sponge which is typically still fine for the duration of a ...


10

While there seem to be a few different mixtures, key to them all is a lower vapourisation temperature requirement and lower viscosity so they are easier to ignite. In cold weather, normal fuel may not flow well or may not be able to light as it won't vapourise.


10

First, sorry to hear the diagnosis, but you are not alone. I've shopped out many a trip for gluten-free clients, and, fortunately, it is surprisingly easy to replace just about every back-country meal** with a gluten free alternative. Quinoa. Corn. Rice. Potato. Soy... there are lots of substitutes. Most large grocery stores in the US are getting better ...


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