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27

In general they are not considered dangerous because they rarely attack humans. You should not run away from coyotes as they will consider you a prey if you do. Under extreme circumstances they may circle an individual or a group. Making noise generally keeps them at bay or at a distance. In 2009, there was, unfortunately, a fatality in Cape-Breton Nova-...


23

Has this happened sure, Traps have been set out after an elderly woman was walking her small, mixed-breed dog on a leash around 10 a.m. on Saturday on Avenida Majorca and a coyote began attacking the dog, Falk said. Falk said the woman tried to wrestle the dog away and was bitten in the scuffle – it was unclear if the bite was from the coyote or the dog. ...


14

Your small dog is at great risk. A coyote recently took the small dog of a veterinary technician at my vet's from the front walk of her house; she was outside and saw it. And if she saw the coyote, the coyote saw her. The coyote did not get a good grip on the dog, and he got away, with a bite wound. Animal control trapped the coyote; it was definitely a ...


14

A few points to add here: Coyotes are not know to be aggressive towards humans. But always remember that coyote is a wild animal. It is not domesticated and hence it's very difficult say with certainty about the behavior. Coyotes are know to attack dogs, sheep and other livestock. So yes, they can bite. If not you, your dog maybe? Any animal, when it ...


13

Coyotes now live in our area in significant numbers. There was a den on our property this winter, and a few months ago there were four pups romping around in our back yard. We hear them howling pretty much every night. I've been in the woods and in open fields with coyotes around and never felt threatened or considered it a problem at all. In fact, I ...


13

Here are some statistics on coyote attacks versus dog attacks in the US, on a per-year basis. (See notes at the end on how I got the numbers.) dog bites: 4.6 million fatal attacks by dogs on humans: 25 coyote bites: 8 fatal attacks by coyotes on humans: 0.06 These figures show that your chances of getting bitten by a dog are about 500,000 times greater ...


9

Coyotes tend to be pretty skittish around humans (although long exposure can acclimate them) and will normally be frightened off by loud noises or bright light. For you personally, they are very unlikely to be a safety concern, though I would worry a little about your dog- a very small breed like that could be at risk. Based on my knowledge, they ought to ...


5

Just today I had a very interesting time watching a coyote (while it watched me) at the golf course across the street from my house in Oregon. S/he wasn't at all aggressive, but wary enough of me to not be seen as a threat to me (for example, the coyotes down in California, where I live outside of summer, are completely unafraid of humans, to the point of it ...


5

I live in NE Ohio. We have coyotes in a number of the local parks here including the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. The only warning the park service gives is that you keep dogs on a leash. They also request that you report any aggressive behavior. The rangers and naturalists I talk to have never had an issue with one except where someone has run their dog ...


5

Your best overall strategy for trail safety would be to seek human walking partners, perhaps through a walking group or social or neighborhood organization. Not only are threats (coyote and otherwise) going to be more hesitant to attack a pack of humans or even a dog restrained in the midst of one, should there be any sort of mishap, humans are more capable ...


5

It's very rare that coyotes ever attack humans, so I wouldn't worry about that. Small animals are another story. I always shake my head when someone puts up a "Lost Cat" sign on a lamppost in my neighborhood. It is definitely wishful thinking. I have lived among coyotes all my life and have had plenty of encounters with them. I've never had any issues, but ...


4

As you have observed, you can legally hunt them year round; You just will not be as successful. Some times of the year are better than others. The best season for coyotes is late fall / early winter. During the warmer months when prey is plentiful they are going to be harder to call. It all comes down to how successful (or not) you want your hunt to be....


4

One factor you might want to consider is how large your dog is. If you have, say, an Alaskan husky, it's unlikely a lone coyote would attack a dog twice his size, especially with a human nearby. Coyotes generally prefer smaller targets, ones they can easily kill and then cart off to eat. This page from an Illinois institute has a good breakdown by size, and ...


4

Watch out for your little dog. When I was growing up in the high desert of LA County, I recall numerous incidents of coyotes snatching and killing small dogs from backyards in our community. The coyotes would jump over the wall into the backyard, grab the dog and be gone before the owner would have time to do anything. We never saw them during the day, but ...


3

I've lived in coyote country for most of my life and I've never even seen one. I've heard them, but never seen them. When I was a kid, I used to wander around the ranch I lived on in Santa Cruz with two golden retrievers. One of them was a male. He was a massive, powerful beast of about 90 lbs. Golden retrievers have a reputation for being friendly, and ...


2

Stay away from them, don't let your kids play outside after dusk by themselves and make sure they are being kids (i.e.- being loud and obnoxious) and keep all food near and around your home inaccessible (including trash cans- use bear country discipline to reduce food reward associated with people smell). Generally, Coyotes are cowards and will avoid humans (...


2

In our neighborhood two small dogs have been snatched off the leash by coyotes (on the trail that runs along between houses and the preserve). Be very wary.


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