40

Yes, you absolutely should rescue the climber when the situation allows. The reason that matters most is suspension trauma: Prolonged motionless hanging in a harness can lead to loss of consciousness and eventually even death. Of course you say the victim is conscious, so he might be able to move or even install a foot-loop to transition weight to his legs. ...


21

Additionally to @imsodins brilliant answer, I'd say the same applies to almost any mountain rescue situation: if you are able to contribute to the situation while maintaining your own safety, do it (and if you're not able, stay out of the way of the rescue team) securing your position takes precedence over the next steps (you don't want to be the next task ...


19

In a 3:1 (Z-pulley) haul, the victim's rope is used for hauling directly. As you point out correctly, a surface rescue is impossible if you have knots in the rope, since the rope is under tension and you cannot untie the knots. However, you can also drop a different strand of rope down to the victim and haul them out with that (it's then called a rescue ...


19

This is a very complicated topic, and you can take an entire course where you learn and practice the techniques. Reading an answer on SE is not going to be enough. You need to practice. The following is just an outline. There is an entire chapter in Freedom of the Hills on glacier travel and crevasse rescue. The first step is always going to be to construct ...


18

If the glacier isn't snowless (aper) you can probe for spaces under the surface which should be noticed by less resistance in the snow/Firn. Still it is preferable to avoid going in regions where one would expect crevasses. This isn't easy like it is tough to know how the weather is going to evolve in the mountains. But still we could try to use some theory ...


14

While children can be proficient mountaineers and well trained, there are things they likely cannot do and some additional risks they face. For example, children are more susceptible to hypothermia. Most children are not capable of performing first aid and lack the physical strength to dig out someone trapped in an avalanche. If a single adult is climbing ...


14

First, see my comment above. Get some professional instruction. Seriously. To answer your points directly: Build a snow anchor, then transfer the load to your anchor. Holding your partner's weight for the entire duration of a self rescue would be a bad idea. Building an anchor is independent of what your partner is doing. Always build an anchor. On ...


14

Sometimes shadows or shapes in the snow give away the location of covered crevasses. Sometimes you can detect a crevasse with a shallow covering of snow by poking with an ice axe or a probe of some sort. The only sure way to detect if there is a crevasse is when you can see it, or when you fall into it when you cannot see it.


13

A crevasse that wide cannot just be jumped across (unless you're among the top long jumpers of the world), therefore you have only two possibilities: avoid it or build a bridge over it. Typically such bridges are built using aluminum ladders (cf. image below) that are placed across the crevasse and fixed on both sides. In the ideal case one also builds some ...


11

There is a clear answer here: just don't do it! Glacier rescue is challenging - you need to know the techniques and practice them seriously. And I can tell you from experience that a glacier rescue is scary, stressful and exhausting, and that was with a party of 4 fit and experienced adults. If you have to ask the question, you simply don't have the skills ...


9

The most important point in any emergency is to avoid making the situation worse. The situation you describe is dynamic and may have several outcomes. Its not really possible to make a decision without seeing the details of the situation. If you attempt to help and mess up there may be more casualties to rescue and the injuries may be worse. Alternatively ...


8

I fell down a 10m crevasse last weekend on the Argentiere glacier in chamonix. I was on a snowboard and luckily landed on a snowbridge within the crevasse which stopped my fall without serious injury. I was then rescued by helicopter. I was with a guide and roped at the moment I fell, but the rope was slack such that the snowbridge stopped my fall rather ...


7

Its more important to know where to expect them. Under tension, Ice is brittle, and strong and in compression. Can we relate the tension and compression under the circumstances like gradient and slope? At least I don't have a strong geology, so there no exact bullet-proof way of detecting a crevasse (unless you don't have a GPR with you :D). You can ...


7

I'm sorry to post a "You can't-answer", but the truth about crevasses is that the only two things that can save you are a) being roped up b) pure dumb luck. If you ever end up in a situation where your actions from "Oh sh*t" to "Ouch, now how do I get up?" matters, you've done something really wrong. Your best chances are if you have: Roped up Have enough ...


5

In addition to Felix's excellent answer of what should be done it practice, it is well worth knowing how to pass a knot in the rope (whether while rappelling or hauling). This will generally be more time consuming than just having an extra length of rope for which to affect the rescue and it should be noted that the knots that were tied to add friction on ...


4

Probing is the best and only guaranteed technique for safely locating crevasses. Knowing how crevasses form will help you identify areas where crevasses are more likely to be, but you can't be certain a crevasse is directly below you if it is not already obvious from above ground.


4

Variations in the appearance of the snow can help detect where crevasses may be. It often helps to get a low angled light perspective such as at dawn or sunset. Depressions in the snow cover may be revealed by a different appearance. Fresh, wind blown snow or dust particles may collect in depressions which could indicate a sagging snow bridge. Crevasses ...


2

You used the term belay incorrectly. The other member is just an anchor. The problem is that the child cannot perform a self rescue and cannot anchor an adult. If you had two groups of three (one all experienced adults) and the all adults lead then the all adults could perform a z-pulley rescue. It still would be traumatic for the child. A child is ...


2

I'd like to add one point to the other good answers: You call mountain rescue and they say they will be there in 30 mins. As you are in communication with rescue, once you have answered all their questions, ask them how to proceed meanwhile (tell what knowledge and equipment you have). Side note: plausibility check for the scenario: You meant to say ...


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