Hot answers tagged

17

Most GPS receivers in phones do not work nearly as well as stand-alone GPS devices. Usually, one wouldn't notice this because phones use assisted GPS where they get the orbital data and/or almanac of the GPS satellites as well as the exact time from the GSM network. Also, they have an approximate position of the device. Without that data, phones are very ...


17

I think you already answered your own question. Most dedicated GPS devices are more rugged, have better battery life, and don't require a data connection to work well. A phone has a lot of power overhead and is fragile. There are a few possible advantages to a phone. If you're already going to be carrying one, it reduces the total weight required. It's ...


14

You'd be better of strength training your muscles to carry the extra weight of the water you need to carry. How much water an individual needs to stay hydrated is not a standard measure. Different individuals need more or less water to keep their bodies properly hydrated. I don't think it's necessarily wise to try and train your body to do with less of ...


12

I have always been advised to be in bright/light colours during the trekking expeds in regions which are known for bad sun. Everybody knows that Black clothing absorbs more heat(radiation). The lighter you wear, the lesser heat you attract(radiation). Now there is a point rightly said above that the darker colours will emit it faster as well, but the ...


12

Let's go through the different aspects of phone versus dedicated GPS device point by point (however, quite surely without being complete). Basically you have to decide which points apply in your situation and how you weigh them. GPS reception and accuracy When the first smartphones with GPS units hit the market, there was the saying that their GPS ...


11

Hold up two pieces of cloth in front of the sun, one black and one white, and see for yourself which passes more light. Dark cloth can be very thin and still block light effectively. Re-emission of energy from darker colors may be a little faster but I think other factors (see below) are much more significant. And don't kid yourself into thinking people ...


11

Large tents are generally not an issue in campgrounds, although finding a large enough flat piece of ground may be. The more likely problem you'll face is maximum stay restrictions. Be sure that you check the requirements before making your decision, because having to move your camp every couple of weeks will dramatically change the setup you want. I ...


9

As you specifically mentioned Southern Nevada Mojave Desert, if you come across a snake and considering the worst case its a venomous snake, then its very likely to be a Rattlesnake or a Side Winder or an Adder. The best way to avoid trouble with venomous reptiles is to be aware of your surroundings and observe some rules for your own safety. Most bites ...


8

I use Timble GPS Hunt Pro on my Samsung Galaxy S5 phone. You can download topo, BLM boundaries, private property and other types of maps that work just fine without a cell signal. The maps I use are incredibly detailed. If you do have cell coverage, you can add weather overlays. Map prices are reasonable, and you can buy a subscription that lets you ...


8

If you're not concerned about bears, I would (ironically) suggest using an Ursack. The Ursack is a kevlar bag that is "bear resistant" but not legally approved for use in many areas which require bear canisters. They weight much less than bear cans, but are very resistant to punctures, so a coyote shouldn't be able to break into one. You may have concerns ...


7

For your situation I strongly advice against relying on your phone. It's a great backup but to much of a risk to use as a main device. Three reasons to get a dedicated gps: Batteries: A gps mostly works on standard AA batteries which can be bought anywhere and rechargeable ones are easily charged on solar energy. (look up goal-zero for instance). Rugged: ...


7

I would at least look into multiple smaller tents instead of a single large tent to handle all. Other than the cat thing (I really don't know how to respond to that), I'd probably have one tent for sleeping, and another for the "office". A third thing that isn't really a full tent but more just a canopy for cooking, eating, and other things that can be ...


7

This sounds to me like a bad idea because you don't want to go into the hike already a little dehydrated. My recommendation would be to go into the hike very well hydrated, and to drink a lot of fluids during the hike, and don't forget about electrolytes.


6

Grand Canyon National Park employ a waiting list for unreserved permits. If you have a week, you have a very good chance of getting a permit even on campgrounds in the corridor. We visited Grand Canyon National Park in May 2018. We applied in December 2017 for overnight permits at the Cottonwood Campground, but did not get any. The morning after we ...


6

You could talk to the guys at Panther Primitives. They make high-quality canvas wall tents for the historical reenactment community, and they spend a sizeable amount of time camping in them. However, I really think your answer is a yurt (or ger). They are round, so that helps with high winds. They are big enough to walk around in. They have accordian-...


6

Short answer - if you have to ask, you most certainly shouldn't do it! The Simpson is regarded as one of the ultimate challenges for cross-country drivers. There are no easy routes, and the dangers are significant. You would need a high ground clearance 4WD vehicle, and also a great deal of skill and experience together with detailed research and planning. ...


6

I have served in an Army that tried that, “water discipline” was used to try and make soldiers get used to using less water. It failed miserably, people have died or got seriously hurt and there was no visible benefit and the habit was abounded


5

It would be unusual for a snake to attack a stationary person. I suppose it's possible that a snake might approach you or your shelter to try to get warm, and you could then surprise them after they had already settled down near you. I'm guessing there is no coyote season in Nevada, so you could be doing it any time of year. If it's the winter, snakes are ...


5

Adding to what Don Branson said, Try not to dismantle or peep into a pile of stones, small cracks. With reference to :"During winter, do most of these reptiles go in some sort of hibernation, or can some/many still be found and seen during the day where there is some sun?" What I've observed is, It is most likely that you may come across a snake/serpent ...


5

Your body needs a certain amount of salt (electrolytes) to process water (and also for many other bodily functions). If you don't have enough electrolytes then your body's use of water is not optimal. A typical American diet gives you enough electrolytes so that you actually do not need to do anything special to make sure you are consuming enough. If you are ...


5

A lot of the cooling effect of sweat comes from evaporation so it is debatable whether wicking vs non wicking is better in hot dry conditions. Having said that in very hot and low humidity environments it may be a moot point. One area where it may make a difference is if you are wearing a large pack, in this case sweat can build up under the straps and ...


5

To add to what others have mentioned, reptiles do indeed go into hibernation, but not in the thought of "traditional" hibernation, such as that of a bear or other mammals. Reptiles usually do burrow down, but they can certainly be awoken. Here in the southeast, if the temperatures rise just a bit, we have plenty of snakes and lizards around sunning ...


5

I visit AZ every summer and include some hikes in the desert when I'm there. First, don't just take water. That can lead to electrolyte loss, as actually happened to me the first year I did this. Now I dissolve some gatorade powder in the water, and I haven't had that problem since. I usually mix it 1/2 to 2/3 strength relative to what the directions say....


5

I'm no herpetologist, but in my experience, snakes are in the "you don't bug me, I won't bug you" category. If you're sitting in a blind and are still, you aren't likely to surprise them. Surprising a snake or making it feel endangered is what causes most bites. If you're still, they'll tend to just pass by without bothering you, and will likely detect you ...


5

As @Tullochgorum said, the Simpson is a very dangerous area, but it certainly looks beautiful! It's broken down into many sections, and since I don't know your level of off-road driving, I wouldn't presume to tell you which would be best. Disclaimer: I'm not an off-road driver, and have never been on this kind of trip, so everything in this answer will be ...


5

This is from the well known trekker Andrew Skurka, who did an East/West traverse that would cross similar terrain to your proposed route. Question: I have asked around and everywhere I hear that water is sufficiently available in all areas, but I keep wondering about this ‘desert’ area that you also talk about. The area around Askja seems so dry and ...


5

I believe, the concern about foods that do not provoke thirst is relevant only in situations where you need to use water sparingly, such as in "survival" situations. The effect of macronutrients on water balance In another answer I said that protein stimulates urine production and thus water loss (100 g protein > 800 mL urine). During the metabolism of 100 ...


4

Actually, what you are missing here is that we also have heat radiating from our body. When we wear dark color, it absorbs that heat, and allows it to escape. When we wear a light color, it reflects body heat right back to us. There's a number of articles and studies that discuss this.


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