6

Are there resources for identifying dinosaur tracks? No; Dinosaur tracks are called trace fossils Trace fossils are classified in various ways for different purposes. Traces can be classified taxonomically (by morphology), ethologically (by behavior), and toponomically, that is, according to their relationship to the surrounding sedimentary layers. ...


5

The shape of that track reminds me of an ornithopod. There can be some confusion as to how to identify specifically which ornithopod might have made that track (Manus track preservation bias as a key factor for assessing trackmaker identity and quadrupedalism in basal ornithopods, Castanera D, Vila B, Razzolini NL, Falkingham PL, Canudo JI, Manning PL, ...


3

The easy way to think of this is that tracks left in concrete sidewalks are true tracks while pouring plaster of paris into animals tracks left in mud would results in a cast. Sometimes the dinosaur tracks were made in materials that turned to stone and were then preserved as true tracks, and sometimes the tracks were made in soft materials and then filled ...


2

First off, the tyrannosaurus dinosaurs are in the suborder Theropoda, and were bipedal, which is a fancy way of saying that they walked on two feet. They had three toes and one dewclaw. The ones found in British Columbia were over 2 feet long and over 5 feet between tracks. Finally, these tracks are incredibly rare with discoveries in, 1 track 1983 in ...


1

There are resources, but be aware that it is rather difficult to get a definitive answer. Here is a digital book published by the Earth Sciences department of the University of Bristol with a section on identifying track makers: http://palaeo.gly.bris.ac.uk/Palaeofiles/Tracks/default.html Here's a page at the UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology, and notice ...


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