19

The expensive way is to get a harness lifejacket. The cheap way is to fit a crotch strap to a lifejacket (type 2 pfd), this is a standard part and I believe most lifejackets have fittings for one. By your description I'm assuming in this case that you actually mean a buoyancy aid (type 3 pfd) rather than a lifejacket, but you can still follow the same ...


16

I think the best bet for a person without arms (assuming we aren't talking rough water/offshore use) is a type 2 life jacket. Specifically the type that look like an oversized bib. These jackets don't rely on arms to secure them to your body, and will generally allow conscious people to remain face up without much effort which is nice if the wearer is ...


14

Yes, it has been done! You can try contacting the people at Paradox Sports; this sort of adaptive climbing is exactly what they do. In terms of personal experiences, there are a couple of threads on Mountain Project covering this issue. (By coincidence, at least two or three of the climbers on those threads work/worked for Paradox.) The first thread has ...


12

I have a friend with cerebral palsy who likes to climb, and can only use one arm, he did fairly well belaying with a Petzl GRIGRI: It's a self locking belay device, and can be used easily and rather safely with only one hand. Though not as safe, you can belay one handed with and ATC easily enough, the trick is to never let go of the rope while belaying, ...


11

Yes If we assume that this is a summer camp setup where experienced (ish) instructors set up and oversee the rapell, sure. A one-armed person would face two major difficulties. Setting up the rapell (is tying knots and loading rope into brakes/rapell devices) and handling the brake during the actual rapell. On a summer camp, I assume that the kids wouldn'...


11

One excellent idea is a trip to the sanctuaries owned by the Mass Audubon Society. They have an exciting program called The Accessible Trails Project. Our goal is to connect as many people as possible to the nature of Massachusetts. Our trails are extremely welcoming for all – whether you are an individual without a disability who is a beginner on our ...


8

When paddling solo with a passenger, the passenger sits in the bow. Whoever is in control of the kayak should almost always sit in the rear (exceptions being when paddling into a current or into a strong headwind.) You may be interested to know that there are people without the use of their arms who are able to kayak with their feet: Source There are also ...


8

I am an avid birder in and around Acadia National Park. Acadia National Park is one of the most accessible national parks in the system when it comes to major locations and their accessibility. Therefore locations right off the Park Loop Road can provide excellent birding opportunities. I would suggest these locations in and around the park. Sieur de ...


6

I've done it with a broken arm in plaster, but that was nearly 30 years ago when I was a similar age to your character. We always used figure of 8 descenders in those days and had a safety belayer with a second rope (standard practice for kids). In this case I believe the instructor/belayer was at the top. My immobilised arm (in a cast from bicep to palm) ...


6

I've located two current possibilities in Germany, and one potential option in the United States. The first, and what looks like the best, option, is a company called Draisinentour. It utilizes sections of the Glan Valley Railway in the German State of Rhineland-Palatinate. It's quite beautiful! The page with pictures of their draisines includes one which ...


6

I'm not sure what exactly makes a trail more blind-friendly as apposed to something like wheelchair-friendly, so I'll answer for handicapped-accessible trails in general. The vast majority of trails are always going to be more rugged and not aimed at people with handicaps that prevent them from traveling over rough ground. This is not due to some elitist ...


6

It looks like Lion Country Safari matches your description. From their front page: Florida’s only drive-through safari and walk-through amusement park invites you to spend the day on safari with over 900 animals. With animal displays and encounters, animal feeding experiences, 5 rides, water sprayground, food, shopping and more, you are sure to have a ...


5

Bill Irwin, author of Blind Courage found the Appalachian Trail to be a mostly enjoyable outdoors experience. While secluded with good opportunities for enjoying nature away from others. The Appalachian Trail offers some challenges. Assuming your blind friend will be with you or another sighted guide, Facilities don't need to have braille, or special ...


5

I think what you are looking for is these attachments called Wheelblades, Image Source essentially mini skis that lock onto the front wheels of a wheelchair, Wheelblades are designed as an easy-to-use solution that aid traction and give a little extra oomph through snow, ice and slush. ... Like a snowshoe does for the person wearing it, the ...


4

It looks like the gear you need is what is called a "sit ski" Individuals that are unable to stand will ski using a “sit ski,” which comes in a variety of sizes from wide, stable skis to narrow, competitive skis. “Probably 80 percent of our students use a sit-down water ski that was designed by Royce Andes, one of our instructors,” says Haakon Lang-...


4

Seems like standing on conventional skis is out if cannot stand. There actually is a disabled skiing category. There is specialty equipment and I bet as least one ski camp that caters to the category. Mainstream related to water skiing is knee boarding. You don't have to stand and also the pull is not nearly has hard. It is harder to get up than you ...


4

The Chincoteague Pony Swim is an annual event where around 150 adult ponies and their foals from the North and South parts of the island are rounded up and swim at slack tide from Assateague Island to Chincoteague Island. From assategueisland.com (highlights mine), The Pony Swim is usually broadcast live by the "Good Morning America" show. The Wild Pony ...


4

In addition to mattnz's answer (and my answer at your related question): I've paddled a tandem sea kayak (we were using it as a tourer that day) from the back while the front paddler was unable to paddle through cramp. I had plenty of control even though the rudder wasn't available (pedals jammed). A paddling friend has been known to run white water in ...


3

Just a thought: I used to take my mom to the beach in wheelchairs with oversized tires. They made going across the sand much easier. They're made to get wet and are easy to clean. They have a storage pouch in the back, and even have an umbrella for sun protection. I'm not sure how this would work on snow. Here is a link showing you what I'm talking about. ...


3

I found and have visited. Presque Isle State Park Internal combustion engines are prohibited in the interior lagoons, which are defined as the continuous body of water between Misery Bay and Marina Lake, excluding Graveyard Pond. A boat rental concession in the Graveyard Pond area provides a variety of powered and non-powered craft. Beaching of boats ...


3

Have you thought of the Lower Youghiogheny River at Ohiopyle? It's 1.5 hours from Pittsburgh and has the distinction of a paddler being able to park, put in below the falls, run the river, and then take out near the put in (due to its loop configuration). The walk back to your car is 5 minutes. This 'loop' section of the river is about a mile of Class II &...


3

It seems that that there is at least one company that has wheelchair accessibility for railbike riding. It is in Belgium as can be seen here. Biking on rails: it is not an activity we do in the UK - well not legally at least - but wouldn't pedaling along railway lines be fun? Just sit back comfortably on a purpose-built open wagon and pedal your way ...


3

You can also expand the list of accessible routes, and the distance traveled along them, by using a more capable wheelchair. Products such as the GRIT Freedom Chair while designed for outdoor recreation by fit wheelchair riders, are also much easier for able bodied friends of the wheelchair rider to help push, due to their long wheelbases and larger wider ...


2

Given your expected usage, I believe a more practical solution would be an add-on front all terrain wheel. Products like the FreeWheel give the front of the wheelchair similar terrain capabilities as the rear. You can attach and detach it easily, even while in the wheelchair, and it folds up and stores in the back of the wheelchair when you don't need it. ...


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