Hot answers tagged

23

I'm going with "it's too dangerous, so don't do it". I have two manufactured alcohol stoves, and both contain warnings against refill while hot. That being said, my answer is "You don't". Pictured (I can't see the video) suggests a squeeze bottle with a plastic tube running into a reservoir where the alcohol is supposed to be while flames are clearly ...


20

I was once shown a great way to protect the blade on a wood axe or hatchet. I realize that ice axes are a different shape than wood axes, so this may not be a perfect solution, but maybe it will give you an inspiration for something similar. Get an old garden hose. Cut a length of the hose about as long as the axe's blade. Cut an incision down the length ...


19

Linseed oil is used because it's a drying oil, A drying oil is an oil that hardens to a tough, solid film after a period of exposure to air. The oil hardens through a chemical reaction in which the components crosslink (and hence, polymerize) by the action of oxygen (not through the evaporation of water or other solvents). Source It also looks like the ...


17

You don't, adding liquid fuel to stove with a live flame is never recommended. Related meta post Do we want a post notice for questions where people are using equipment in ways that are clearly incorrect or dangerous? Believing the stove to be out of fuel, she tried to pour more denatured alcohol into it from a large container that exploded, shooting ...


16

I've helped a few friends make torches for medieval events they were hosting. As I was the only one who managed to burn themselves during assembly and testing, I feel somewhat informed, if a bit clumsy. Your choice of materials will depend on how long you want your torch to burn for, as well as how brightly. Specifically, your wick material and your fuel. ...


15

My other half used Tyvek when he was practicing Archery and one of the factors there was it had to be quiet, they used it for 4-6 hour stints to sit on. This is what he and some others in his club did: Wash it on a cotton / white cycle in your washing machine without any soap or detergent or powders. Wash it three times but let it dry thoroughly between ...


15

Stick hardwood 2 to 3ft long Wick (I guess that's suitable terminology) cotton rags Fuel lamp oil or in the context of a survival situation, animal fat.† Misc nails or fence staples Directions Soak the rags in the fuel Wrap the rags around the stick Fasten the rags to the stick with the nails, staples, or something similar. Apply fire from an open ...


15

Do you have 2 split rings (keyrings) with you? If so, here's how to make a buckle like that (or rather its D-ring predecessor): Attach both split rings to the upper strap, where the old buckle is/was. Pass the lower strap up through both split rings and back through the first. Here's an ASCII-art sketch before you pull it tight: ----- | //| ...


13

A paper bin is going to make a fairly small stopping area. Hopefully there is something more substantial (like a wall) behind the target that will stop the arrow if you happen to miss the target entirely. A couple of bales of hay make a larger area, small bales are relatively inexpensive and reliably stop arrows without damaging them. The best quality, ...


12

From what I've discovered there are really two main types of Tyvek: hard-structure and soft-structure. The numbers you refer to are variations in applications of the two types. Hard-structure, type 10, is most commonly recognizable in the housewrap application and is suitable for a ground cloth. It is stiff, noisy, and loud but that can be remedied. Soft-...


12

I have to say that "eating with" falls under the same rules as "eating". Don't go out in the woods and put something in your mouth unless you know exactly what you are dealing with. Many woods are toxic. Also remember that "wood" doesn't just come from trees, but all woody plants, which is why some shrubs are also listed here. Specifically avoid the ...


12

What kind of shelter you can build will depend on what is around you at the time. If you are in a forest or woodland you will obviously have more to utilise than in a desert or moorland, but from my own experiences I've built shelters in British deciduous and coniferous woodlands. During Girl Guides (bit like Scouts) and school based Team Building weeks we ...


12

A direct flame isn't a good way to set heat shrink tube as the flame is much too hot, making it very difficult to apply heat evenly without just melting the tube. The ideal thing is a hot air gun. You can get smaller more precise ones for fiddly electronics applications etc but for arrows a standard sized one should be fine and they generally aren't too ...


11

From my experience there are two good ways to do this depending on the weather conditions you expect to encounter. Place waterproof tarp outside tent Good for rain conditions or where rocks and debris can damage the tent floor. Purchase a good quality waterproof tarp slightly larger than tent footprint dimensions. When setting up the tent Fold edges into ...


11

For the spike, I usually just take a piece of corrugated cardboard, fold it to double the thickness, punch holes through it, and use some thin cord to tie it through the hole in the spike. This is low-tech and works if I lose my protector while traveling, which is what always happens. No matter where I am, it's always pretty easy to get some cardboard. For ...


11

The simple answer is yes, you can definitely use waste paper or cardboard to stop an arrow. Various folks have used cardboard boxes, flattened, and piled up to anywhere between 6 and 12 inches thick, held together with straps or duct tape. You'd need to use trial and error to find out what thickness works for you - if you compress the cardboard tighter you ...


11

Typically, using 3/4" (19mm) plywood board is strong enough for this use. And the bolts you want are 3/4" (19mm) plus enough each end to screw into the hold and to accept a nut. Bolts used for most holds are M10 or M9.5, so check which your hold supplier uses, and then make sure the holes you drill are that thickness. This sort of bolt seems to be the most ...


11

The tool pictured is riveted together with solid rivets. It is not designed to be repaired, as mentioned in a comment, if it is not working correctly it should be disposed of and replaced. It is possible to use a grinder to remove the flared head of the rivet and then punch it out. Alternately you can drill out the rivet, by drilling a hole in the exact ...


10

There are three important aspects: Maneuverability, exposure to wind and firm attachment. The optimal orientation for all of those is vertical. Most of the board is then covered by the body so there is minimal added wind resistance compared with horizontal mounting, were most of the board sticks out on the side and act as a huge sail. With horizontal ...


10

I usually sharp my crampons when I am expecting icy conditions, that means glare ice. Especially when you go steep and need front point technique, you need to rely on those points - all your bodys weight. If your front spikes are too coarse, you need much more energy to bring them secure and stable into the ice. Besides that, the ice will splinter and break ...


10

According to Will Gadd, you should sharpen your crampons and ice tools after every use. If you spend just a minute or two after each trip–sometimes you won't even need a minute, just give them a look over and a couple passes with the file to take off a couple burrs–then you're never going to have to worry about dull points. Regular maintenance also ensures ...


10

If you are very lucky, there are rich natural sulfur deposits readily available nearby. An example of such a place is Indonesia and Eastern Java, where blocks of Sulfur can basically be picked up like rocks from the ground. --> Note that such locations are very rare and will generally be colocated with zones of strong geologic activity/volcanoes/hot ...


9

A few years back at my University climbing gym, someone posted a study performed on chalking your hands while climbing. Basically, it was discovered that there was actually a measurable decrease in the coefficient of friction when you used chalk. As in, chalk made climbing holds harder to hang onto. This of course made all the climbers who read the abstract ...


9

There really is no good replacement for chalk but natural conditions and some tricks can help to make it easier to climb without chalk. Some areas in Germany have very strict (Elbsandstein - no chalk) or strict (Pfalz - chalk starting around 5.12) ethics concerning chalk and it might be a good idea to look at how climbers there deal with sweaty hands. ...


9

You could look at bungee cord hooks. They're pretty cheap and come in a bunch of sizes, plus you can bend and adjust them to suit your purpose. You can get them attached to bungee cord, as a length of cord or as a loop, or you can purchase them individually. Another option if you do want to use an antler is to check out pet shops, they tend to have loads ...


9

You will need to counter sink (fostner) the nut (bottom right) on the back side (because it will be up against the wall). A drill press would be nice. Or space the board from the wall. Any solid wood thick enough. If you are not going to counter sink then you should be able to use plywood. Practice on a short section.


8

The clove hitch is probably what you're looking for. You can even tie it directly on the branch/beam/bar without worrying about adding a carabiner. You could also tie it to the carabiner, adjust the length, and clip the carabiner to something else. The clove hitch is one of the most under-utilized climbing knots out there. It's infinitely adjustable because ...


8

I can think of the following two ways to cover the blade: You can use something like a Bike Handle cover, the one that has a cap on the other end. You can get it of the size that your axe-blade fits in. I assume that the main blade will be a bit hard to fit in, but then you can always give a try towards getting the handle cover which is a bit flexible(...


8

You could make your own with a smaller piece of hardwood 1x4. With a jig or bandsaw, cut a notch out for the hook, then remove material along the outside to make it narrow. Guaranteed to be comfortable and sit flat in your pocket. Just draw the hook shape first so you know what it will look like and where to cut. You can even smooth it out with a rasp or ...


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