Hot answers tagged

136

Yes, you absolutely need to properly protect your food. Proper food storage in the wilderness isn't just for you, it's also for the bears. Even if your dogs or you are able to fend off a bear, you may in the process clue the bear in to the fact that where there are humans, there is food. And if you've inadvertently trained a bear to think that human campers ...


119

Couple suggestions for meeting people on the trail with dogs, Keep the dogs leashed. When passing people put the dogs on the opposite side of yourself so that you are between the dogs and the people. Pull off to the side and have the dogs sit, as this demonstrates that you have control over the dogs and they will listen to you. Talk with the people you meet,...


93

Wild dogs can indeed be dangerous, and packs can be extremely dangerous. You do not want to take on a pack of dogs if you can at all avoid it, and running is often a particularly bad idea. I suggest starting with the basics: try to keep the dog calm and don't try to intimidate it. This means: Don't make direct eye contact, and remember that sunglasses ...


58

It can be used for sure, but there are better options. A knife would require you to be very close to the dog, whilst a stick or pepper spray would provide much greater distance between you and the threat. Pepper spray is used by the US Postal Service, and they have lots of experience with dog bites. Of course, if you can avoid aggressive dogs in the first ...


49

Your primary objective when defending yourself against stray dogs is not to kill the dog, but to avoid getting bitten make the dog leave you alone If you fight a dog with a knife, even if you manage to kill it or make it run away, you will likely get a few bites and scratches. Having a stick or pepper spray is a much better option, as it gives you a range ...


48

You know, most black bears are probably going to be deterred by the presence of your dogs, but bears come in all sorts of personalities and degrees of desperation for food. Your dogs might be able to take a bear in a fight, but that doesn't mean they won't get seriously hurt in the process. Think about the possible consequences if deterrence fails: A ...


42

To the question of whether you should run from a pack of dogs that may be aggressive, the answer is an unqualified NO!. As to what you should do, the answer is a bit more complicated. In the vast majority of cases, dogs won't attack you without provocation. As always, assume the best but prepare for the worst. The basics: Be Prepared: Prevention is ...


33

As someone who is fine with dogs, I'm saddened that my son was nipped by a puppy when he was very young and is now very nervous when needing to walk past dogs, and there are lots of strays where I live. In time, I hope to help him react to dogs in a different way, but right now he is afraid of them. If you met him with your dogs, there is nothing you can ...


31

I regularly backpack overnight with two dogs (one is a great dane / lab mix) in the US. A tired dog is a good dog. I have an advantage of several miles of hiking in, but you can still tire the dog out when you get there. A frisbee (flying disc) and swimming works well for my big guy (the lab mix), my smaller girl is tired from the hike itself. Whatever ...


30

Knife is not a good idea. It does not give an understandable warning to an animal. When it comes to a warning, they more likely understand a stick-shaped thing. So for carrying, light telescopic baton is more suitable (or any other stick you can comfortably carry around). Remember, at the first place, you want to repel oncoming animal, not to harm it. Also, ...


28

I'd say the only circumstances where you could try to run is when a safe place is near (your car, some kind of shelter, a tree you can climb etc.), the dogs are already alert and running to you (otherwise you could just walk to the shelter without them noticing), and you can realistically make it to the shelter before the dogs do. Remember that dogs car run ...


25

So far all of the answers are assuming the wild dogs are actively hunting you or at least seriously considering attacking you. This might be due to the part of your question where you say: ... or should I stand fast and defend myself? If the dogs appear to be actively hunting you then a controlled exit to a safe area as suggested by Dmitry Grigoryev is a ...


25

Though you don't actually state it, I get the impression you normally let your dogs roam free on your hikes. If this is correct, then you are taking a very large risk with other people's health and welfare. Both your dogs are large and very capable of inflicting significant injury on even an adult human. Dogs will react violently if they feel threatened or ...


23

The most important thing is keeping all dogs on-leash in public areas. Technically, you can't make any person not feel afraid. But a leash will do a lot to reassure someone who is frightened or concerned, so they know they can maintain a physical distance according to their comfort level. Some folks, such as myself, are highly allergic to dogs. Many times, ...


22

I think the biggest issue here is that you're likely to find strays won't respond to commands that, for a normal dog, would work at keeping them from following (stay or wait). I've actually had this experience as well when walking along a canal with my husband, a narrow boat owners dog followed us for a good 200 yards before we walked him back and got them ...


20

Keep your dog on a leash. According the the Scouts, dogs are a bad idea in bear country. Leave your dog at home. A dog often infuriates a bear and may come running back to you with the bear in pursuit! New Hampshire department of wildlife agrees that, while small, the primary risk is that your dog agitates a bear then runs to you for protection with ...


19

They protect the paws from injury or already injured paws from getting worse (and having bandages ripped off). Things they protect from include: rough terrain - sharp rocks, etc. chemicals like salt used for de-icing roads extreme cold ice balls forming between the dog's toes.


17

Do you make your own dog food or purchase bagged food in the store? Either way, an idea would be to use puppy or performance good as they're both higher in caloric value, nutritional content and are easier to digest than regular dog food. The actual amount of food you feed really depends on your dog. How has she handled the shorter hikes? Have you ...


15

There's a decent thread discussing this issue over at BPL. Based on that and similar discussions, my suggestions would be as follows: Cover the floor of the tent with a tarp or similar material. While the flooring will probably be fine, this will provide additional protection (and simplify cleanup if there's mud involved). (When wild camping you can ...


15

Well there are many ways to prevent this, the easiest way would be to trim the hair between the paws. You can also buy dog-sock to put on the dog, the best way if you have seen dogs running with dogsleds. And if you really don't want to do either of those options, you can buy paw-grease or paw-vox like "ice on ice". Hope this will help.


15

They are often basically the same but there are often three additional items listed: tick tweezers louse-comb foldable cone (to be preferred), muzzle or strips of cloth to prevent biting (its wounds etc.) Especially the tick tweezers seems to be pretty useful of course. Other pet-specific supplies to assume Pet first-aid book Phone numbers: your ...


14

I'd need to know a bit more about your winter hiking conditions and duration. If you're erring on the side of active, I'd suggest a Labrador. If you're doing colder and shorter, something like a Bernesse Mountain Dog would do amazing. I love running with my Labrador since she can handle heat decently (I don't run with her when it's very hot), she can ...


14

I actually answered a similar question over on Pets not long ago... Warm weather walkies and water... however you've asked in a bit more detail so here goes... How can I know that the dog is perfectly hydrated? The dog will refuse water given to them if they feel like they've had enough to drink - this is a slim balance especially in male dogs, as it's a ...


14

From personal experience with packs of stray dogs, especially coyotes, and also having some strange experience, carry a walking cane or staff (if you can). Dogs, while attacking as a pack, or thinking about attacking, try to do three things: Find easy prey Limit prey mobility Attack prey blind spots Keeping this is mind, stay moving to wherever it is you’...


13

The breed of dog will make a difference, but most "backpacking" dogs will do just fine in the open or under the tarp with you. A dog's metabolism works differently than humans, and they generate a lot more body heat. Consider sled dogs that stick their nose under their tail and sleep through a driving blizzard (and sled dogs usually aren't the thick-fur ...


13

These boots are designed for a few purposes actually. Firstly, dogs paws can be affected by snow and ice - especially in breeds or dogs unused to colder climates. The boots help protect their paws from the colder temperatures, and also help prevent the build up of snow on their paw hair - which can then clump and freeze and cause irritation for the dog. ...


12

Lots of mushers will 'candle their dogs'. Use a candle and pass it quickly over the bottom of the paw. The flame singes the hairs between the toes and is harmless to the dog. Practice on your arm hairs to get the speed right. Much faster than trimming. Most dogs hate socks and will chew them off as soon as they can.


12

In Mexico, I learned that the best way to deal with wild dogs was to squat down very briefly and pick up a small stone. I never had to actually chuck it at a dog. They skulked off quite quickly when they saw the movement that looked like the human was picking up a small rock.


12

We're planning to take our dog kayaking in the not so distant future. We both have two Sit on Top Kayaks which easily leave him room to sit between my feet. If you can fit him in your cockpit in a sit in kayak then it shouldn't be an issue either. From below you can see a section in the back where you can add bags etc (with a elastic string to keep it in ...


12

Statistically, most of the dogs in the world are dogs that are not pets, but live around humans and scavenge food or get food from humans who give it to them. These dogs are in my experience never aggressive with humans. When a dog is kept as a pet, it will tend to be territorial about its home. When I've been out running, hiking, or cycling, there have ...


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