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21

They are basically measures for the quality of the down fill. The 90/10 part refers to the mixture of down and feathers. As down contains nearly no rigid structure, one adds some amount of feathers to give the whole filling some more stability. The example of 90/10 means 90% down, 10% feathers and seems to be quite a typical mixture. I'm not sure about the ...


16

I emailed Feathered Friends and PHD about this issue. I only got a reply from FF so far: A compression bag greatly reduces the size of a sleeping bag. There is no limitation to compressing down, as long as the down is not being stored compressed for an extended period of time, It will not be damaged.if you are taking it out and using it everyday. ...


11

The answer to "it is considered in the temperature rating" can be yes, no and maybe... Really it depends on the manufacturer and how they test it. It also depends where the manufacturer market is: in some part of the world there are some standards and in others there aren't. One of the ways to find the rating is to test in a controlled environment with a ...


9

Down is a natural product, so fill quality, odour and durability can vary quite markedly within a species depending on the breed, age and condition of the bird. Practical performance is also strongly dependent on the skill of the processor and the quality of any proofing applied. These sources of variation are greater than any variation between duck and ...


8

From The Feather Company, London Duck down is the most common type of filling. Down from geese is usually larger than down from ducks. Muscovy down has features very similar to eider down i.e. they are more crooked and intertwined. Eider down is the world's lightest and best insulating material. It is a very exclusive and collected manually ...


8

Down is actually a pretty durable insulation, and if it is properly cared for will last much longer than any synthetic insulation. Some people use the same down sleeping bag for decades, but there are a lot of variables at play, and maintaining a down sleeping bag is a bit of an art form. When you buy a used down sleeping bag you will want to know: How was ...


8

Over compressing any bag, whether it be down or synthetic, will eventually lead to loft degradation. If you compress your bag too tight you can cause damage to the barbs and barbules of the feathers, which will decrease loft over time, but this is apparently less of an issue with higher quality down. To be honest, I think you would have to have one ...


7

I think the answer is as simple as: If you own a mid-layer wear it to the store when you purchase the shell. If you own a shell wear it to the store when you purchase your mid-layer. If you don't own either purchase them together to ensure best fit. There are several different layering systems find what works for you and try everything on in store. If ...


6

Your question is also addressed at http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Down-Jacket-Reviews/buying-advice High-end jackets often use lighter-weight fabrics and high-quality down. The only practical differences between them may be in features (hood? two-way zipper? water bottle pocket?) and exact fill weights. Lower-end models may use heavier, more durable ...


6

I asked this question to my mother who knows well the quality of down. During your trek, if you compress your down sleeping bag a lot and if it's a very good quality down (90-10 or 95-5), you shouldn't have any problem in your trekking. It's very important when you return home to bring air to your sleeping until your next adventure, so hang it in your closet....


6

According to this blog: http://blogs.militarytimes.com/gearscout/2013/01/21/down-is-coming-from-arcteryx/ it simply refers to Arc'teryx getting into the down game at all (previously having no down offerings). With respect to hydrophobic down, the entry states: Carl told us they considered using recently introduced water resistant down, but their testing ...


6

Gear manufacturers generally purchase the down (waterproofed or not) from suppliers. There are several water resistant down products, but they all work withing a small range of results with the same basic tech. Things to know: It's water resistant not water proof. For jackets this means you can probably withstand sweat and a light shower, but not a ...


5

GearScout blog post on Down is coming from Arc’teryx provides some insight on Arc'Teryx usage of down in their products. According to them, Arc'Teryx did not have down products in their lineup prior 2013. Arc’teryx didn’t want to enter the down fray unless its design effort added a considerable performance benefit over what was already on the market. ...


4

If the bag was compressed most of the time during the storage it may provide less insulation than a recently produced one. The other thing is, if the bag has caught mildew, you might not be able to get rid of the smell. Or, if the smell goes away after washing, it may develop again. Check for mildew (image) - if there are any small black or similar dots ...


3

Down will inevitably pierce through thin fabrics (an thicker ones too, just less frequently). It's in the nature of quills to do so and even if very fine, there are quills nonetheless. The lighter the denier of the fabric or the looser it's woven, the easier the down will get through. Short of having a garment that is lined with something that slows this ...


3

It looks like the answer is no, The biggest problem you face in dyeing a coat is that it probably has a DWR (Durable Water Repellent) finish. This is a coating that is applied to the outside of the fabric to resist water. It's very important to have a DWR finish on a down coat, because down loses all insulative ability once it gets wet. ... If ...


2

You should consider water repellency. Down does not hold heat once it is wet. Unlike synthetic fillings. This is particularly true of older down products. The only real innovation in down technology over the last few years has been the introduction of durable water repellent (DWR) down fills. Down with this treatment tends to repel water and is warmer when ...


2

Have you tried tossing it in a dryer on Air Fluff with some tennis balls, for a little while? Edit: See also suggestions here.


1

Down is fairly easy to measure in terms of loft when you lay out the old bags. Basically, if the feathers are so crushed that after a proper wash and fluff you don't have a bag that holds up the fabric a couple of inches above the floor - you'll know to try sleeping in it with a backup blanket or plan to test how warm it now sleeps. Presumably, you won't ...


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