20

The best thing you can do to both ward off illness, and catch any illness so it can be treated early, is to schedule an appointment with your doctor, soon. When you request the appointment, make sure you mention drinking untreated creek water as the reason for the appointment. That will give your doctor time to look up references to the appropriate ...


12

EDITED TO ADD: Please also read the other answer by cbeleites unhappy with SX about the risk of heavy metal contamination. The information in my original answer (below) is still accurate regarding microbes, but you also need to worry about heavy metals, and a water filter will not remove those. Apparently the low pH of bog water makes the risk much higher ...


5

Peatland/bog water has lots of humic acids. They lower pH (see also @SherwoodBotsford's answer), and they are chelating agents. Both low pH and chelating mean that they tend to mobilize heavy metal ions, As-species behave in a very complex manner (see e.g https://www.publish.csiro.au/EN/EN05025 for a start). I'd therefore avoid drinking bog/peat water in ...


3

I hike in that very area some years ago. We would typically get water from the refuges. Specifically: Le refuge de la Balme Le refuge de la croix du Bonhomme Le refuge des Mottets Il refugio Elisabetta You'll find clean water there, and they are not that far apart (about half a day between each, I'd say). The rest of the time, if you don't have enough ...


3

At the time, yes. Don't eat anything when you drink the water. This will reduce the likelihood and severity of food poisoning. The ingested water will have its pH rapidly reduced which will kill some pathogens. if you have food in the stomach as well this will happen more slowly. Also, a bolus of food is more likely to protect and transport pathogens. ...


3

For what it's worth, I had a previously scheduled appointment with my primary-care physician a few days after the incident. One of his interests/specialties is remote and wilderness medicine. His advice was that in the absence of symptoms there is nothing to do but wait. There is no way to preempt symptomatic infection after exposure, but if symptoms develop ...


3

Practical checks: Watch your pee, both frequency and colour. If your pee is clear, and you are peeing often, you are at no risk of dehydration. May be drinking a bit too much. If your pee is clear to pale yellow, and you peeing at reasonable interval, this is optimum. If you pee is dark yellow, strong smell, then you should be drinking more. Background: ...


2

Before drinking from a stream, check your map to see where that stream comes from. Does it flow through a settlement or even worse past something industrial? Does it come from a lake? Could be polluted with anything, including things you might not be able to get rid of by filtering or cooking. If you have a choice, avoid! (if this is a survival situation: ...


2

I had a quick look at this from another angle in 2021. I found an existing breadth condensate collection device. Not the ideal answer in and of itself, but certainly worth a look. They place an upper bound for collection from an adult of 250 microlitres a minute, that's if you can actively cool the collection tube. The device collects up to 10 minutes worth ...


2

Probably your best solution is to take a small camping stove and boil water you get from a creek. The huts are basically doing the same when they sell you tea water. In my experience, most bivoucs require you to bring your own stove anyways, so this method hardly adds any weight (maybe some extra gas). It is way cheaper than buying a water filter and it does ...


2

No. Your sump/transfer pump is probably not rated to hold pressure to act like city water. To act like a city water service, you need to rig up something more like a well with a pressure tank and pressure switch. If your sump pump can develop enough pressure to act like city water, you need to add a pressure switch to turn off the pump when there is no ...


2

A smaller flask is of course lighter, but loses heat faster and holds less. Your whole drink strategy needs to be considered. A litre is a lot though, unless sharing - there's plenty of choice of 500-600ml flasks; one I found easily weighs 300g (compared to 530g for their lightweight 1l model. Thermos, the brand I've linked, has been in the business a long ...


1

You have to make a judgement call based on what you know about activities in the area. Peat bogs tend to be both very low in nutrients (life is hard if you are a small organism in water) and very low in pH (few bacteria thrive at pH of ~4) In Canada, I have drunk water untreated from: North Saskatchewan Red Deer South Saskatchewan Red River Winnipeg ...


1

Many years ago, I was in a similar situation. When I returned to civilization I went to see a medical doctor. If I recall correctly, the doctor ordered one or two tests in which I was required to collect a small amount of my stool and place it in a cup for analysis. My memory of the experience has faded, but I think the cup was filled with some sort of ...


1

I am a retired university professor in Public Health, especially in simple remedies. My Korean wife and I have traveled into 30 countries giving seminars. The one friend of travelers is charcoal, either powder or tablets. It is one of the best stomach remedies to protect from water or food in foreign situations. A couple of cards of Activated Charcoal ...


1

Prevention is better than cure! There is simple strategy that the other answers seem to have overlooked. Research shows that you can reduce water-loss by exhalation simply by breathing through your nose rather than through your mouth. According to this paper, the savings are in the region of 40%. Nasal breathing will also help prevent over-exertion, which ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible