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18

Was it better than no protection? Probably. Would I recommend it? No. The reason is this: DMM performed some tests where they anchored a sling to a carabiner and a load (80kg), and dropped the load from various heights. The results are a bit more nuanced, but the gist is that you should never fall onto a sling from at or above the anchor without any dynamic ...


10

See: Slings for anchoring and lanyard in rock climbing Different question, but but it contains a lot of the same releveant information for an answer to this one also; basically either one will work well. Short summary: Your rope is designed to absorb the impact of your fall, while a sling is absolutely not. In the videos presented by DMM you can see what ...


10

Do not use this cordelette for your protections: Knots will slip so the connection of the cordelette ends to form a ring will fail under load. Only use sewed Dyneema slings. Still Dyneema cordelettes are often used for climbing as they are much lighter for the same strength than nylon based ones. To know how this is possible despite the problem mentioned we ...


8

Out of all the products that are out there for climbing, Dyneema is considered to be the most abrasion resistant. That means that it is the least likely to be cut on a sharp edge, in fact Dyneema is used to make cut-resistant gloves, but that does not mean it's impossible to cut. Dyneema Properties Whether or not your sling would be cut by a rock edge ...


6

It certainly isn't safe to use a sling or anything else which will not absorb shock in the event of a fall. Although you are probably not likely to have this sort of thing while scrambling, if you know are going to need to clip in to something for some reason, you could always take a tip from caving and use dynamic rope to make up what we call "cowstails". ...


5

Given the low stretch properties of Dyneema. Should I be using these as lead anchors over flakes or should I switch to nylon? Yes, it's absolutely fine. Whichever sling you use, your rope is the dynamic (shock-absorbing) part of the system, and that doesn't change. You shouldn't clip directly into either, and Raz's linked answer covers most considerations ...


4

What you describe is called creep. According to this technical manual Creep is a material property frequently misunderstood and can be defined as the continued extension of a material when subjected to constant, long-term static loading. There are several types of dyneema and some of them have lower creep resistance. Balance community says Some of the ...


4

Either will work, but Dyneema and Nylon have different properties that can make them more or less advantageous in certain situations. Dyneema is obviously a lot lighter than nylon, which gives it a lot of it's appeal for alpine climbers, it is also more abrasion resistant, in fact the material is also used to make cut-resistant gloves. The disadvantage to ...


4

In the specific example of the video of your girlfriend, what you did seems to me like a perfectly reasonable way of dealing with that spot in the climb. When we talk about the bad consequences of taking a short fall on a static line (wrecking pro, snapping slings, injuries to the climber's pelvis), we're talking mainly about factor-2 falls on a vertical ...


3

Allthough I'm not a professional climber, I do regularly set up climbing obstacles and ziplines for children (scouting). When working up in the threes we mostly secure ourselves using slings so we can have two hands free to secure children or work on the rigging in general. I've taken a fall or two onto a sling (like you said up to 1 meter) and although ...


2

As a general rule of thumb: Never use static material only as protection while moving. Unless you anyway know what you do, I suggest you stick to that rule. There are several examples of fatal accidents involving static falls of very short distance into your binding, which then broke. Fall factors are not a factor to consider, as this compares length of ...


1

PPE or ALL climbing gear in general should only be used if there is ZERO question in your mind about the safety of the equipment (ropes, slings, anchors, prussiks, carabiners etc). Your life depends on this stuff. Don't short cut or try to save a few bucks. Do it right or don't do it at all.


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