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86

Just because there are grasses (Poaceae) with edible and nutritious parts does not mean that this applies to all grasses. That is pretty common-place. A quick Google search give you all the info you need: Many grasses are edible, in the sense that you can eat it; you simply won't get any energy/nutrients out of it. They consist mostly of cellulose, and ...


24

Eating grass isn't smart because our bodies lack the enzymes to digest it, and because you never know if some animal came along and crapped on it. Don't eat grass.


17

No. For one, you may not be capable of gathering any worthwhile nutrition. You could eat grass all day and still be hungry. Secondly, many animals are immune to toxins that are nasty to us. Best example I know of is that goats and many other new world animals can eat poison ivy. But if you try eating it, you're in trouble.


16

Apart from the low nutrients issue, grass stems are covered in tiny silica spikes, which act as an abrasive on your insides. These spikes are thought to have evolved as a defense against being eaten (Silica in grasses as a defence against insect herbivores:) -- which clearly didn't work in the long run. But anyway, if you don't have a tough lining like a ...


16

To add to the existing answers, depending on where the grass is growing, there can be all sorts of synthetic fertilizers thrown onto it which would be very harmful to humans. You do not want to eat Scott's Lawn Fertilizer.


16

The practice of eating insects is called entomophagy. References using that term can include many insects. I've narrowed it down to ants and termites as best as I could, although some of the general advice and information include ants, termites, and other insects. The short answer is that not all ants and termites are safe to eat, but most of those you're ...


15

If you are referring to Crataegus, then yes Hawthorne is edible, the pomes are like tiny apples with two flower spots on the bottom. It is commonly made into jelly, syrups and country wine. Regarding the seed, you want to pull this out after cooking the pome just like you would the heavy solids of any other fruit. I know you mention raspberry and black ...


12

It looks like eating raw acorns won't kill you but its not likely to be pleasant and can harm you. That said, even “sweet” acorns should be leached to remove what tannins exist in them because several studies show that unleached acorns can make you constipated and can harm your teeth. Source If you've ever tried a raw acorn, and quickly spat it out, that'...


11

Watermelon snow is caused by algae called Chlamydomonas nivalis. Apparently, it has laxative effects. As Giersch and National Park representatives explain, the red pigment in the algae helps to protect its chloroplast from the sun’s radiation, allowing it to take in more heat. As the algae absorbs the sun's heat, it causes the snow around it to melt, ...


10

A look through the veterinary literature can show you some further reasons not to just go out and eat grass. Specifically, parasites like liver fluke, different species of tapeworm, and some nematodes can infect humans as well as sheep (or cows, or mufflons, or whatever lives on the pastures where you find your grass). So, in a real outdoors situation, ...


10

Yes & no. The U.S. Navy land survival training in Pensacola, Florida teaches students to chew on pine needles to obtain vitamin C. But you don't actually chew and swallow them.


10

There is one poisonous: the Desmarestia. The other species should be okay. However, I can't say anything about if they are "worth eating" :) Desmarestia is a genus of brown algae found worldwide. Members of this genus can be either annual or perennial. Annual members of this genus can produce and store sulfuric acid in intracellular vacuoles. When ...


9

I looked first at bears to get a handle on this question, because it is well known that bears get a significant part of their caloric intake from berries. I should have looked first at berries! According to Blueberry Nutrition Facts, one quart of blueberries has 340 calories. Let's assume that the lost person of the Q expends 4,000 calories per day ...


8

If you are eating fruits like these, you aren't eating true almonds. These are tropical almonds, Terminalia catappa, and the entire fruit and nut are edible.


6

Crataegus is definitely eatable, and has medicinal qualities. But remove the seeds before preparing any significant quantity. You also might wish to know that mature hawthorn fruit is often loaded with Codling moth larvae. And read this about seed toxicity.


5

People make lots of claims. You can find all kinds of suggestions when you research this, some of it even from people who are considered experts. In the end, all you can do is use some basic logic and look at some real, anecdotal events. For long term survival, if you can attempt to get back to civilization, that is always recommended. People often suggest ...


5

There are multiple guides to edible foods, it looks like you would be most interested in would cover all of North America and if you are wanting to go light, there are pocket guides. I found quite a few including, Edible Wild Plants and Herbs: A Pocket Guide Edible Wild Plants: A North American Field Guide to Over 200 Natural Foods Edible Wild Plants A ...


5

I am quite certain that there are more deadly mushrooms than just the one you mentioned - if only for the other members of the Amanita Genus, many of which are very poisonous and some plain kill you. E.g. Amanita Vitrosa, with the uncommonly poetic name destroying angel (German: Weisser Knollenblätterpilz), is just as deadly as the one you mentioned. What ...


5

What kind of mushroom is this? Not sure from the photo or it’s description, but without a positive identification available, I would not eat it at all. In fact it looks like a false morel and they are poisonous. False Morel (Gyromitra species) (Poisonous) Not a true morel, but often called morels by mushroom hunters. Illness and deaths have ...


5

Regarding your plant, yes, it's a serviceberry. The dark blue berries are perfectly ripe, and you should harvest them immediately if you want to eat them. The pink ones aren't quite ripe yet. The berries on a single serviceberry bush tend to ripen almost all at once, rather than a few at time, so the birds don't always notice right away. Once they do, they ...


4

In the spring you can commonly find delicious new shoots on spruce. They are quite good as a snack when there are no other significant sources of food to eat, or perhaps on a hike.


4

Short answer, yes. There are thin or even pamphlet sized guides to wild edibles. I doubt you would find any practical use with those. They simply don't have anything but the most well known plants and they often skimp on pictures and description or how to prepare. Longer answer, if you seriously want to learn about wild edibles you will end up with many ...


4

I often found myself following these steps from Lofty Wiseman's Survival Guide, even though I was not in a life or death emergency situation, and never had any problems. It allows you to safe check all vegetation. These methods have proved themselves on several occasions during my time in the army. I am not encouraging anyone to use this method in a non-...


4

The answer to your question is no. North America is a huge region. Even California is vast and varied, e.g., we have miner's lettuce at low elevations, but not higher up. For a given subregion, e.g., low altitudes in the Transverse Ranges of California, it's fairly easy to learn enough to identify a few trail snacks that might (or might not) be available. ...


4

The simple, common-sense answer is no, a small amount of sumac wood (such as could be accidentally consumed with sumac tea) is not poisonous for human consumption. We can conclude this from the fact that A) normal sumac tea preparation methods can include some of the wood, and B) people don't get sick from sumac tea prepared by these methods. People have ...


3

A bit more methodical approach to IDing this plant: Opposite leaves + a corymb of multiple dark-colored, round drupes is very indicative of the genus Viburnum. If we check BONAP and Ontario Trees & shrubs, we can see that only a handful of Viburnum species are found in Ontario. From Ontario Trees & shrubs: Viburnum alnifolium (Hobblebush) ...


3

Disclaimer: I may be wrong, don't eat things that you are not 100% sure are edible!!! This is a Nannyberry. It is edible. More information here. Wikipedia Link for convenience. Fun fact: The English translation of its German name is "Canadian Snowball" (Kanadischer Schneeball).


3

IMHO, it looks like typical Eurasia yellow Hawthorn. All hawthorn are edible and they do carry some cyanide in the seed like crab apple. As long as you don't swallow 100 pounds of seeds you should be fine. Found similar tree here: https://www.dreamstime.com/crataegus-yellow-berries-green-leaves-romania-hawthorn-fruits-contain-antioxidants-have-property-...


3

There are a couple of long quality answers. This is the short simple version. There are either berries or not, if there are berries, and you know they are safe, eat them. If your sitting and waiting to be rescued, you might as well spend your time eating the nearby berries if they are there. There no reason not to. If you are traveling and there are ...


2

There are ebook applications for all smart phones. Adding a memory card to most phones is inexpensive and weighs less than the dust on your clothes. There is plethora of ebooks on edible plants. A quick search on Smashwords (no DRM) finds 1400+ We have a post What are some ways/devices that I can use to charge my batteries in the wilderness?


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