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6

What kind of mushroom is this? Not sure from the photo or it’s description, but without a positive identification available, I would not eat it at all. In fact it looks like a false morel and they are poisonous. False Morel (Gyromitra species) (Poisonous) Not a true morel, but often called morels by mushroom hunters. Illness and deaths have ...


4

The simple, common-sense answer is no, a small amount of sumac wood (such as could be accidentally consumed with sumac tea) is not poisonous for human consumption. We can conclude this from the fact that A) normal sumac tea preparation methods can include some of the wood, and B) people don't get sick from sumac tea prepared by these methods. People have ...


3

A bit more methodical approach to IDing this plant: Opposite leaves + a corymb of multiple dark-colored, round drupes is very indicative of the genus Viburnum. If we check BONAP and Ontario Trees & shrubs, we can see that only a handful of Viburnum species are found in Ontario. From Ontario Trees & shrubs: Viburnum alnifolium (Hobblebush) ...


1

Looks a lot like a morel, but there are a few kinds including "false morel" (I forget if it has any toxicity). However you need a much more reliable place than this to be sure. Study this year and remember where it was, good chance they will come back next year. One line I remember is that morels come up when "the new oak tress leaves are the size of fuzzy ...


1

To be honest, I'm not sure we have enough information here to help you in this case. There are many different kinds of puffballs, some are edible, some are not. Depending on the age they will also vary wildly in their look and consistency, so this makes it even harder. I can really only recommend two ways to identify mushroom: Get a decent book Buy a ...


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