55

Edit: It turns out battery-powered heating in clothing actually is used on Mt. Everest: Hotronic makes battery-powered heated insoles that are used by Everest climbers, for example. Battery powered jackets and other types of clothing are also common, but the models I checked only provide warmth for a few hours (e.g. this jacket, which runs 3-10 hours on a ...


40

Firstly there's the weight issue - as Paparazzi commented, batteries are heavy! Then there's temperature - battery performance drops considerably in the cold And finally reliability - if your electrical circuit goes, you will freeze unless you have properly insulated clothing... so why bother having the batteries at all?


31

I did use my phone as a mapping device a few times when I forgot my dedicated GNSS receiver at home (for peakbagging day-trips where I need to reach a specific point often under forest canopy and without easily identifiable landmarks). The battery doesn't drain exceedingly fast but the more I look at the screen and interact with it, the faster it drains. It ...


25

Yes it does, especially mobile phones. I attended an avalanche course last year. The guide did a very simple demonstration. He powered his avalanche beacon on "send" mode, and put it on his backpack over the snow surface. All participants walked away from his beacon in a straight line with their own beacons in "search" mode. We all marked in the snow the ...


21

Perhaps the most obvious and commercially available is solar, which has options ranging from small pocket-sized chargers to roll-out military grade flexible panels. I believe Brunton makes a consumer grade version of the latter (not as bullet-proof), and iGo has some nice versions of the former. I have used both with some success, the panel is probably ...


17

If the GPS is mostly off (i.e. you're only rarely using your GPS app), I think you will get ~2 days of battery life. To get that much battery life, you'd need to do these things: Keep the GPS off as much as possible (i.e. use it no more that 5-6 times a day) Turn it off at night completely keep brightness to a minimum Disable all cellular antennas (may ...


16

In my opinion, the single best feature would be low battery consumption. You only really need a gps and map, so having a low consumption version of these would win for me, possibly with local maps rather than trying to download each section.


16

There are 3 main types of night vision equipment; Image intensification This is the type most commonly used by the military. It works by effectively amplifying the available light and may work in visible or IR spectrum or both and works in a similar way to a TV camera. These systems rely on some light e.g. from stars or moon being available and won't work ...


15

I would just get a waterproof case for whatever electronic device you have the books on and then a waterproof/impact resistant USB flash drive for the books. SD cards are more breakable and prone to getting lost or misplaced than USB flash drives. A quick price checks says you can get a Water proof to 200M through the use of a EPDM waterproof seal ...


14

I am the lead hardware engineer for Backcountry Access. Interference from personal electronic devices (PED) is very real, and it can range anywhere from minimal impact to severe. The reasons are a little complicated to understand, but basically the worst case is if the PED emits a signal at or very close to 457kHz, which is the beacon frequency. LED ...


12

From your three options, a Dedicated GPS unit is going to be your best bet. Smart Phones barely last a day. If you're out of coverage, the phone will keep searching for network and battery will die as quick as a cat fight. Of course you can use the airplane mode but we all know how long they last. GPS watches do last a long time. It will vary a bit from ...


12

I own a waterproof smartphone and it works as an E-book reader. I think there are also waterproof tablets, which will give you a bigger screen. I do not know whether there are waterproof dedicated e-book readers, but there might be. Both phones and tablets usually take SD cards, although not all will take all sizes so you need to be sure you have the right ...


12

Consider buying a power bank with a solar charging panel; that lets you recover from an accident like leaving your phone on overnight with something consuming power. There are two main types on the market: Big panels you unfold and hang up at your campsite or on the back of your pack while walking. (I've never used these.) Standard batteries with a small ...


11

Battery consumption is determined by the software, too. Some stuff polls for new data, some takes GPS readings more often then others, etc. Honestly, I do not consider using a smartphone app for hiking or getting out into the backcountry. For too many of them you need network connectivity, battery life is a real issue (compared to dedicated GPS devices),...


11

I would buy a headlamp, it’s so much more convenient to have your hands free and the light always pointing where you look. I would go for two/four AA bateries. My current headlamp uses three AAA’s. The odd number is not practical when buying or charging and if it used regular AA’s instead, I could exchange the batteries with my GPS or my backup phone. The AA’...


11

Some back-of-the-envelope calculations: 12 volts * 4 amps = 48 watts * 8 hours = 384 watt-hours. That's the minimum battery capacity you'll need to power this for a night. The Goal Zero Sherpa 50 you propose to use will power it for about an hour, give or take efficiency losses. To power the blanket for the night, you're looking for something more along ...


11

I'm very satisfied with my Goalzero Nomad 7, it's small, easy to strap to your backpack, and it fully charges your batteries or anything that charges from USB or even 12V power in as little as 3hrs in good sunlight. There are lots of solar panels to choose from, any one will probably do the job, so shop for one that suits you. What you really need in your ...


11

How much margin due to charging inefficiency should I add when calculating the size of batteries needed for a trip? You need approximately 50% more due to inefficiencies while charging from a power bank. How much energy you really need will depend a lot on the actual usage, so you'll have to make some experiments. Put your fully charged phone in airplane ...


11

It all depends on how (and how much) you use those devices. Personally, I can say more about DSLRs than phones, and with 2 different DSLRs on 5 tours (of 2-3 weeks) there was never an identical usage so far. The "official" number of photos you can take with one battery can be exceeded by limiting every usage outside of taking the photos - those are included ...


10

Shouldn't be less efficient at all - or at least, approximately as efficient. Solar panels generate energy utilising the band-gap structure inherent to semiconductor materials. This means that, to generate current, you need to dislodge an electron from the valence band to the conductor band, and the laws of quantum mechanics state that this can only happen ...


9

Power (watts) = Voltage (volts) * Current (amps) or Current (amps) = Power (watts) / Voltage (volts) So in order to determine the watts from amps, you also need to know the voltage of the devices. Since you are camping, and specifically "car camping" rather than backpacking, I would expect most of your devices will be 12V DC (ie, made to run off a car ...


9

Yes, the solar panel will be a little less efficient on the dashboard than outside because: Wavelengths absorbed by the windshield. The windshield absorbs most UV, which does still contribute to the solar panel output when present. Light attenuation due to air/glass interface. The glass will always reflect some light. Think of it this way. You can see ...


9

Garmin GPSMap 182C and Simrad TP32 share the same language (NMEA 0183), but they do not have enough in common to talk about. The NMEA sentences that the 182C can transmit are GPRMC, GPGGA, GPGSA, GPGSV, GPGLL, GPBOD, GPRTE, GPWPL, PGRME, PGRMZ, and PSLIB. The first two letters of these identifiers are the Talker ID. GP stands for GPS receiver. PG and PS ...


8

According to everything I have found on the web and experienced with my own watch, the watch will not register as mass storage so that you could access the recorded logs directly. Therefore you cannot just plug the watch to a random computer and copy he logs like it was a USB thumb drive. But, there's at least some help: Computers running on Windows or ...


8

As Rory says, low power consumption is vital, but that's likely not determined by the software, but rather by the hardware and - more importantly - how you use it. The three key things for me in Smartphone GPS map systems are these. Can download maps to the device, rather than stream. (And I wouldn't trust anything claiming to just 'cache' streamed maps, ...


8

You could consider looking into something like the PowerPot. They are currently accepting pre-orders on Kickstarter. It is described as follows: Simply put, the PowerPot transforms the heat from cooking into electricity (…) using a technology called thermoelectric power generation. I’m not sure how well it will work, but from their description it ...


8

My solution is to let the phone be a phone (and GPS and web browser and ...) and take a camera to be a camera. My camera uses AA batteries, it's simple enough to bring spares, and I have a solar recharger for them too. I can take hundreds of pictures before I need to recharge the batteries. I can turn the phone on once a day or so to use the GPS or whatever, ...


8

I get the stated question is generate power But if you are just looking for power a battery is very weight effective. One AA battery is only 0.8 ounce. A pair (1.6 oz) on low power will last about 4 hours. The SolePower is a cool product and good answer but all set up it is about 24 oz without batteries. Add in 2 sets of batteries 27 oz. You ...


8

There are basically two major types of generators for this situation: traditional and inverter generators. The expensive ones are the inverter generators, and the difference between the two types is the major price differentiator. The electrical power used in residential applications, and likewise the devices you'd power in a camping situation, is ...


8

The overall efficiency from a power bank to a smartphone battery is about 2/3, according to this source: https://www.powerbankguide.com/powerbank-capacity-explained/ The amount of energy a battery can provide depends on its voltage (nominal 5V for a USB power bank), the size of the supplied current in Amperes and how long the current can be kept flowing. ...


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