121

Couple suggestions for meeting people on the trail with dogs, Keep the dogs leashed. When passing people put the dogs on the opposite side of yourself so that you are between the dogs and the people. Pull off to the side and have the dogs sit, as this demonstrates that you have control over the dogs and they will listen to you. Talk with the people you meet,...


115

There are three good reasons for this: The harder work an uphill hiker has to do The smaller field of vision of an uphill hiker They are in that "hiking rhythm" zone which shouldn't be interrupted (Inertia) This paragraph contains everything you need to know: And most important and most ignored, everything else being equal, give the right of way to ...


95

I can only speak from experience, but I'll share what I have seen. The following paragraphs are ordered from least desirable to most. In every case where people have been playing music on a speaker of some kind (including phone), people on the trails around them show signs of being annoyed. I believe this is acceptable behavior in some other countries which ...


75

I, and the people I hike with do not appreciate music on the trails. If you want music use headphones. We try to hike the least popular trails to avoid encountering blaring music. We are out in nature to experience nature.


70

No. There's nothing wrong with asking other adventurers where they have adventured. I've asked random people that question, other people have asked me, it never has put me or them on edge or anything of the sort. Sometimes people like to know if the trail they're on leads to something interesting and is worth going, sometimes people like to hear of others ...


69

For the most part people head into the back country to enjoy the sights and sounds of nature; playing music detracts from that for many people. This is partly because music covers up other sounds, being largely continuous noise, and often played loudly. Many portable speakers (at least until quite recently) are horribly tinny and very artificial sounding, so ...


54

Is it acceptable It depends. The response will vary from person to person. Some might agree, someone like me won't. In general, this hatred you are referring to isn't only towards music, but towards all artificial and unnecessary sounds. Example - Playing music, loud talking/shouting, whistling for no reason, etc. For many (if not most), being outdoors is ...


44

No, it would not be offensive. A survey of 200 pilgrims on the Camino de Santiago found that motivations were as follows, in order of importance: Exercise Adventure Peace, solitude, relaxation Spiritual (but not explicitly religious) A lifetime experience A religious pilgrimage (9.6%) To meet people. Source: Top reasons why people walk the Camino As you ...


39

One of the first hits with your google search terms is explaining the issue very objectively, with no noticeable "vitriol" or "extreme hate": Here's why you should stop blasting music on the trail (one of the most important parts is not about humans at all, but about damage to the animals). So I won't repeat all those points. You have ...


38

Just don't play your music with the aid of any electronic speakers. People sing and talk and laugh as they hike and that's fine, its when they start blaring music on their waterproof bluetooth speakers that it starts to get annoying. Just note that it will make you less aware of your surroundings, I have seen plenty of people not realize that I was hiking ...


36

Depending on how much other stuff you will be carrying, a whole trumpet and case may be too heavy and/or bulky. Just take your mouthpiece and blow through it when you feel like it, on an easy part of the trail. Maybe not your prime mouthpiece - a spare one that would be less-upsetting to loose or damage. A brass mouthpiece weighs around 75 grams (2 2/3 ...


35

As someone who is fine with dogs, I'm saddened that my son was nipped by a puppy when he was very young and is now very nervous when needing to walk past dogs, and there are lots of strays where I live. In time, I hope to help him react to dogs in a different way, but right now he is afraid of them. If you met him with your dogs, there is nothing you can ...


34

For another possible explanation, I have always found it easier to see oncoming parties when you are going down. When hiking uphill, many people end up almost staring at their feet. In contrast, when hiking downhill you can spot oncoming parties much more easily.


34

There is nothing wrong with asking people you meet on the trail where there are coming from or going to. This is very normal trail-encounter talk. I've asked people this many times and rarely gotten a negative reaction. Likewise, I've been asked these many times, and never considered it to be inappropriate in any way. One obvious reasons hikers do this, ...


31

This answer is based on the meaning of "Petri Heil", I have hardly any first hand knowledge of the use of this phrase. For starters it is certainly restricted to countries where the majority religion is christianity, as "Petri" is a reference to the biblical fisherman Petrus (Luke 5.1-11 and John 21.1-14).[1] Then "Heil" is a somewhat outdated German noun ...


28

Invite them both on a day hike. That's a end onto itself, so no need to pretend anything else. You can watch the interaction between #2 and #3, and talk about experiences to find out what #3's qualifications are. If after that you still think #3 is a good fit with you and #2, then suggest to #2 to invite #3 along on your backpacking trip. If he agrees, ...


27

My answer is "don't ask". It's not so much that it's "impolite", but it's an imposition to them and potentially dangerous for you: Belaying can take quite some time, so you're asking the person to give up a chunk of their recreation time to a total stranger. It's not like you're asking someone to help for 30 seconds You're putting your life in their hands, ...


27

For one, thank you for asking and planning to be considerate. I wouldn’t wholly throw away the idea of practicing while on a backpacking trip, particularly if you’re a professional, but there are definitely ways to be considerate. I generally don’t think that people would appreciate long periods of listening to someone practicing, regardless of skill level. ...


26

Though you don't actually state it, I get the impression you normally let your dogs roam free on your hikes. If this is correct, then you are taking a very large risk with other people's health and welfare. Both your dogs are large and very capable of inflicting significant injury on even an adult human. Dogs will react violently if they feel threatened or ...


25

The most important thing is keeping all dogs on-leash in public areas. Technically, you can't make any person not feel afraid. But a leash will do a lot to reassure someone who is frightened or concerned, so they know they can maintain a physical distance according to their comfort level. Some folks, such as myself, are highly allergic to dogs. Many times, ...


24

Context matters. There is nothing wrong with "where have you been" when you meet a fellow backpacker on a trail. But that is not the context of the linked question. Here, the other person is in a panic due to seeing your dogs, and potentially suspicious of you. In this frame, "where have you been" may sound like a nosy question, but so does "where are you ...


24

From my perspective, it depends on where you are backbacking/camping. And it's not other humans I would be concerned about primarily. If you are in a very remote setting where there are only very few or no other humans, then I would recommend to be careful with the noise that you make. This does not only apply to trumpeting. The wildlife in that remote area ...


22

Being noisy in public is generally annoying for people around you, regardless of what kind of noise it is. (Exceptions apply, e.g. sporting events where being noisy is expected) Playing an instrument on hiking trails is a specific case of "being noisy". One of the main reasons people are on trails in the first place is to get away from noise and people. ...


21

It is much easier going down than going up, and it is easier for the people descending to stop than the ones going up. The people going up will be working much harder, and be more irritated by having to wait for someone.


20

Generally "X gives way to Y" rules can be found not just on trails but on open water (steam gives way to sail) and in rivers and channels, even on city sidewalks. They seem to be based on these (potentially contradictory) reasons: slower movers should allow faster movers to pass them and carry on away (after catching up from behind) more nimble entities ...


19

In the Grand Canyon, it's because it's easier for a human to get off the trail than it is for a mule. I suspect the same reasoning applies in most places.


18

I grew up in Italy, in a fishermen's village on the Adriatic Sea. I never heard this expression, and I am pretty sure I've never heard it anywhere in the Mediterranean. Furthermore, I think that a "HEIL" in the southern European seas is one of the most non-local and foreign-sounding expressions that I can imagine. So please don't even try it :-)


18

In addition to the fact that it is easier to go down than up, I think the biggest issue is safety. If you were to fall while going down, there is risk of injury to those below (coming up). It is much easier to lose your footing and fall while moving downwards, and knocking people off a trail can lead to serious injury. If you were to fall while going up, ...


17

Would you start playing the clarinet on a bus? It's also noisy, somehow. People also wouldn't expect complete silence. Would you be the one to guarantee there is no possibility of silence at all? Public places are just that: public. There are people and if you play music, everyone is forced to hear it. If you pee on the ground, everyone is forced to smell ...


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