75

For the most part people head into the back country to enjoy the sights and sounds of nature; playing music detracts from that for many people. This is partly because music covers up other sounds, being largely continuous noise, and often played loudly. Many portable speakers (at least until quite recently) are horribly tinny and very artificial sounding, so ...


55

Is it acceptable It depends. The response will vary from person to person. Some might agree, someone like me won't. In general, this hatred you are referring to isn't only towards music, but towards all artificial and unnecessary sounds. Example - Playing music, loud talking/shouting, whistling for no reason, etc. For many (if not most), being outdoors is ...


41

One of the first hits with your google search terms is explaining the issue very objectively, with no noticeable "vitriol" or "extreme hate": Here's why you should stop blasting music on the trail (one of the most important parts is not about humans at all, but about damage to the animals). So I won't repeat all those points. You have ...


36

Depending on how much other stuff you will be carrying, a whole trumpet and case may be too heavy and/or bulky. Just take your mouthpiece and blow through it when you feel like it, on an easy part of the trail. Maybe not your prime mouthpiece - a spare one that would be less-upsetting to loose or damage. A brass mouthpiece weighs around 75 grams (2 2/3 ...


27

For one, thank you for asking and planning to be considerate. I wouldn’t wholly throw away the idea of practicing while on a backpacking trip, particularly if you’re a professional, but there are definitely ways to be considerate. I generally don’t think that people would appreciate long periods of listening to someone practicing, regardless of skill level. ...


24

From my perspective, it depends on where you are backbacking/camping. And it's not other humans I would be concerned about primarily. If you are in a very remote setting where there are only very few or no other humans, then I would recommend to be careful with the noise that you make. This does not only apply to trumpeting. The wildlife in that remote area ...


16

People go hiking to experience quiet- the absence of sound. For you to fill that empty space with sound is in very poor taste. It it audio-littering that ruins the space for others. Put you headphones on, or better yet, leave the audio device at home and experience real nature. You can listen to music or podcasts or whatever literally any where else- a hike ...


13

I think that the harsh reaction also expresses a measure of moral and cultural rejection. Being surrounded by electronics and consuming mass media is exactly what many hikers try to get away from. The German philosopher Günther Anders, who was in exile in America and was a keen observer, notes with respect to the still relatively new mass media in his 1956 ...


13

Is it acceptable There can be three sources of music: A cappella singing, Instrumental music, Artificial music (from a loudspeaker). Personally, I think soft a cappella singing/humming or whistling can be acceptable under certain circumstances. I don't know if it scares animals any more or less than talking. Some people may want to play the guitar or ...


12

The Leave-no-trace tag in the question implies that you are familiar with the concept. Have you actually read the Leave No Trace principles? I'll quote from Leave No Trace Canada's 7th principle page: Be Considerate of Others One of the most important components of outdoor ethics is to maintain courtesy toward other visitors. It helps everyone enjoy their ...


12

I want to challenge a premise you made in your question. only do it in a remote area with zero other humans I want to say that unless you are in an open desert, there is no way you can possibly know there are no other humans. In fact, this is the exact time you should avoid playing music for 2 reasons. Leave No Trace. This is the most basic gospel tenet ...


11

You mention "areas where you might only encounter a few other people". Your music will certainly annoy all of them, plus the ones within earshot whom you do not encounter, and this might be a very large range. You will very likely have spoiled a very large part of their day, which might well be a rare opportunity for them. What your threshold for &...


8

Some notes on sound propagation (to address comments and other answers in a more structured way than would be possible with more comments): Further reading, and notes on speech Wikibooks has a pretty comprehensive article on outdoor sound propagation. From that, 1kHz at 20°C and 50% RH is attenuated by 4.66dB/km. Wikipedia gives a range 40-60dB for normal ...


8

In a city you are bombarded by music everywhere you go. A supermarket, a restaurant or any other public place, in some cities even in the tube or train stations. In countries like Italy you can go through terrible orwellian experiences under the loud speakers blaring music and advertising in airports, train and tube stations. If there is no infrastructure to ...


7

Many hikers are already listening to music -- the symphony of the nearby running stream, the distant percussion of waterfalls, the complex melody of many birds, the almost, but not quite, inaudible background of many small critters, the sigh of the wind --- and the pauses when you can listen to a profound and restful silence unlike you can ever experience in ...


5

See also answers to What exactly is so wrong with playing music on trails? which are pretty much universally don't do it! A campground in the evening has aspects of a confined space; once can of course suddenly go flashlight-hiking or drive away1 but if you've started a fire or settled in for the night, one can feel constrained to remain. Another person ...


5

If you haven’t done much hiking before: Don’t underestimate how exhausting it can be. Depending on the hike and level of fitness there is a very real chance you’ll be too exhausted to do any serious, beneficial practice. I agree with the other answers that playing the trumpet could seriously annoy other people. However, it very much depends on time and ...


4

I really hate music when I'm hiking (particularly loud music). I hike, in part, to get away from noise and crowds, to get in touch with nature and enjoy the sights and sounds of being in nature. And that's not even getting into the fact that I mostly likely don't share your same taste in music. I can't stop people from blasting music. There's no law against ...


3

I came in here as a musician from this question on music, so I leave the hiking relative aspect to others. As for the need to keep the chops in shape, you could just bring your mouth piece. This does not produce that much sound as with the instrument. My brother has a plastic mouth piece lying the car, and he sometimes blows it while driving... An even ...


2

There is nothing more refreshing than breaking out my minor-keyed harmonica after dinner by a campfire playing a melancholy cowboy melody from yesteryear - communally sharing stories with friends with much laughter and tears. It can get very loud at times. Guilty as charged. I come from a large Hispanic family where if you don't shout you are not heard ...


2

Trumpeting while backpacking? Do not see a problem with it, but please remain considerate of others. Hunting horns have been in use for centuries and are still in use in certain countries. It is a tradition. Nevertheless, one should be respectful of trumpeting in and around campsite, where others may get annoyed easily. Many hikers and campers appreciate the ...


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