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41

As an active adult in the Boy Scouts of America, I would highly suggest that you find a local scout troop in your area and sign up. Not only will you be helping the troop in a number of ways, but it will present you with a great way to learn many of the outdoor skills that you are interested in. As the Boy Scout troop gains new members, they will have to ...


27

Volunteer in Search and Rescue (SAR). I just got certified through my state's Sheriff's Association as a volunteer search and rescuer. I went through a two-month-long class with an intense outdoor "final exam" in order to get the certification. Class topics included: tracking, outdoor clothing and equipment, wilderness navigation (map/compass/GPS), fire/...


22

I don't know of any organization as you describe, but there certainly ways for adults to learn outdoorsmanship. There are likely outdoor clubs in your area that run educational programs. Here in New England, the major one is the AMC (Appalachian Mountain Club). They regularly run educational programs on various topics and at various levels. I attended ...


14

You could read the Boy Scout Handbook and the BSA Fieldbook to get a strong basic knowledge of scouting skills. You'll need to get hands on experience, but that doesn't require being in the back country.


11

There's a lot of great answers here, and one answer touched on it, but I really wanted to emphasize the quality of the resources and classes available at REI. Classes are open to members and non-members, with members getting a discount on paid classes but they also have free options for things like emergency preparedness. The REI website has a search page ...


7

http://www.outwardbound.org/ - has education programs for adults. However, I think you're on the right track with just finding your local community in some online way. For example, you can learn a lot and meet local folks here: https://bushcraftusa.com/forum/ Do not underestimate the value of becoming a Boy or Girl Scout leader - it can be very fulfilling. ...


7

The American Alpine Club and the Alpine Club of Canada each have local sections that offer regular skills courses in ropes, weather, orienteering (map, compass, GPS), climbing, mountaineering, avalanche safety, glacier travel, backcountry cooking, ski touring, how to lead groups, and more. Membership is usually very affordable (around $50 a year) and many ...


4

If your looking for a club you and your child could participate in together then maybe checkout Spiral Scouts International. http://www.spiralscouts.org/ It is for kids aged 3-18 years old, co-ed. They are not religious, there are badges you can earn that are about religion but they are completely optional. Spiral Scouts strongly encourage the child's ...


4

Baden-Powell Service Association (BPSA-US), a traditional scouting organization that promotes inclusive membership, outdoor skills, back to basic traditional program and service in the community. They have adult section called Rover open to adults.https://www.bpsa-us.org/


4

http://www.venturing.org/ Venturing Age Groups Venturers Youth Participants: those who are age 14 (or 13 and graduated 8th grade) through the age of 17 are referred to as youth participants. Adult Participants: those who are age 18 through 20 are considered adults (per youth protection guidelines), however, may still participate in the program through ...


3

I think the closest "adult version" of Boy Scouts are Firefighters. They help people, cut trees and any kind of useful "manual" work the citizens need. Logically there are quite big differences but I hope you get the idea.


1

The cub scouts and boy scouts are now accepting girls in their programs. As your daughter is 3 or around 4 since this was posted she would have to join cub scouting and you can be there with her as a parent or a leader if you wish. It's an option and when she's old enough to move up to boy scouts you can move up with her.


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