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11

Pneumonia is not what you have to be worried about in this situation. It is a serious pathological condition of the lungs commonly (but not exclusively) caused by viral or bacterial infection. Unless you were previously infected it is not likely to catch anything away from civilization. There is a widespread notion of a relation between being cold and ...


10

Stop PAMPERING Your Feet if you Want Them TOUGHER! Not sure what you mean by "liner socks", but one of the worst footwear mistakes a hiker can make is wearing TWO pairs of socks. I would sincerely advise against two pairs of socks, if that is what was advised above. Most seasoned distance hikers and runners would tell you that, or ask yourself after doing a ...


8

I walk and hike barefoot a lot. My feet have no hard skin (ok a few bits around the heel as anyone would). The skin is just as supple as anyone elses, but it's tougher. So if I walk a long distance barefoot, I don't get blisters. Small bits of glass don't affect me 99.9% of the time. The other main difference is I'm used to the sensation of the ground - the ...


8

Yes, you should seek medical expertise. From healthcentral.com: When the skin has thawed and rewarming is complete, cover the damaged skin with bandages and warm clothing. Contact your doctor or go to an emergency room.


7

Heat rashes are caused by excessive heat trapped under the skin. As you specifically referred to ankles and shins, I'd suggest you considering using shorts instead of full pants, only if those tiny red rash-bums have not burst. If those are already burst then you should be going to a doctor in order to avoid any infection. Try to avoid clothing with ...


7

Depending on how cold the rest of you has got, warming the extremities by increasing blood flow to them may be a bad idea. They're probably numb in the first place because your body prioritises keeping your core warm, and that's a good thing There's a phenomenon known as after-drop, which can lead to hypothermia if not managed well. This is why you can get ...


6

48 hours is very definitively too long for your feet to be wet, even regardless of temperature. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immersion_foot_syndromes From the CDC article "Injury occurs because wet feet lose heat 25-times faster than dry feet. Therefore, to prevent heat loss, the body constricts blood vessels to shut down circulation in the feet. Skin ...


6

This sounds like exercise induced Vasculitis. This is tiny blood vessels which break due to heat & restriction due to socks & friction. Also known as a golfers rash. It tends to happen more in people over 50. It has nothing to do with being overweight either as someone commented on the web. Mine was as a result of hiking a minimum of 25km per ...


5

Simply walking barefoot everywhere is one way to toughen your feet. If you live in a city, spend time outdoors in your yard, on the concrete of your garage, patio and on the grass of your lawn. But there's more than just going barefoot that will harden your feet. Jumping rope, running, jumping...you need friction and impact. But, even walking barefoot ...


5

I lifeguarded in a beach for many years where the beach was covered in iron ore pieces, kind of like walking on crushed glass mixed with sand. It wasn't painful but it did hurt and tried to avoid when possible. By the end of the summer my feet were tough enough that I have stepped on glass about 1 inch in size and it does not puncture.


4

Try wearing a pair of wool socks inside your footwear. I used to hike and canoe in MEC reef boots -- basically a neoprene boot with a rubber sole. I would wear a thin pair of polypro socks and a pair o wool hiking socks in them. While my feet were wet all the time, the extra insulaiton from the socks made all the difference. Depending on how snug your ...


3

I used to have the most tender feet. However, I've found that by simply going barefoot year around is the best way to harden them. I live on a ranch in Texas, so I go barefoot whenever possible. Of course, I regularly run barefoot and yes, your feet will toughen to the point where hot, triple digit asphalt is not even noticed, let alone cooler concrete. ...


3

I have routinely done week hikes with sufficient creek crossings that we didn't even try to keep dry feet. (Coral Creek has 22 crossings in 3 miles. Most of the trails in the area have at least a knee deep crossing every hour.) These trips would be the first intro to the school I worked at. A 7 day trip would cover from 80 to 120 km and 15 to 30 thousand ...


3

Soak feet in salt water. It dries out bottom of feet so blisters don't occur


3

Having various long hiking experience I find the following seems to help reduce blistering: Toe socks .. big help. Stopping and changing socks OFTEN or as soon as tehre is any burn feeling. This is the biggest thing. As soon as you sense friction STOP and deal with it. Let feet cool and dry and change socks at least. Use Band Aid blister pads. ...


2

Surgical spirit works every time. Rub it in using cotton wool for a month before you hit the trail. The best blister prevention is to walk, walk and walk.


1

You can definitely train cold resistance, yes. It’s mostly a case of continuous practice. But in your case you might find it much simpler to just move your feet more. It’s very easy to shuffle about a bit on a board.


1

The only way to toughen your feet is to put them in environments where they have to be tougher. I would start by wearing thin sandals everywhere during any weather. Whenever you can walk barefoot in grass or any other natural surface. I hardly ever wore shoes as a child and teenager and it hurt at times but now I can walk pretty much anywhere and my feet are ...


1

To walk barefoot on gravel, relax and spread your foot out as wide as it will go for each step, don't tense up and try to walk on the balls of your feet. Been barefoot since the last century.


1

Walk barefoot a lot. Rub your feet with alcohol. Use the 99% stuff, not the 70%. Soak your feet in brine. On hot surfaces it's cooler to run. When you walk, each foot is on the ground more than half the time. When you run there is at least some time that both feet are airborne. I got to the point where I could run to the 10 miles to work, wearing ...


1

I live in San Diego and this past summer I've walked barefoot at home almost 100%. Meaning when the Asphalt in front of my house was 135°F, I'd purposely stand on it to toughen the feet up. I also walk the dog a mile a day on concert and do yard work barefoot. My feet toughened up, check. Next is dexterity of the toes. I have a bunch of small objects in a ...


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