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18

Walk backwards. The fins will have the least trouble with the water if you walk backwards.


11

I am a 25+ year scuba divemaster. Alas, poor fin kicking technique is very common, even among experienced scuba divers. First of all, selection of a fin which is too flexible is better than one which is too stiff (within limits). If you sometimes use a full 7 mm (1/4 inch) wet suit and other times no wet suit, you likely need two sets of fins. Same for ...


11

Here are some things I've noticed in my relatively limited snorkeling experience: Fins with straps are quite annoying. The strap never really holds well, and you already have enough problems being awkward with fins on that you want them to at least be secure. An open toe will allow them to drain when you get out and the vent makes them easier to get on and ...


10

The first thing to understand is that fins are not strictly necessary snorkeling gear; I've often snorkeled without them. Fins compensate for not using hands while swimming. If you have an underwater camera and/or anticipate strong currents, you'll want to use fins in order to help you propel yourself along under water. Even if these don't apply, having fins ...


7

Walk sideways like a crab. Every time a wave comes, stop and brace yourself. First it is easier to walk sideways while wearing fins, second it reduces the surface area that the wave hits. Just take it slow. Edit: Seeing as you have problems with the straps when trying to put them on in water, the straps can usually be changed. Spring straps are much ...


5

Walking backwards is the usual way for a short distance. For a longer distance, I hold my fins in my hands and wade out. When it's deep enough you put them on. This is a bit of a skill. Wait for a wave to pass, then take a breath and put one fin on. Accept that your head will go underwater as you do this. Wait for the next wave and repeat. I hold my second ...


3

Since most high-tech fins are made for scuba diving, you may want to consider wearing small 1.5mm neoprene dive booties with dive fins. This eliminates several issues with: fin straps falling off your heels chafing / blistering around your fins where they rub the skin toes getting compressed in your fin in order to get a snug fit. low selection ...


2

I'll say full boot (more comfortable, and you don't need to buy booties), open toe (for water and sand to drain), solid (more sturdy against accidental strikes), and on the shorter end of the models. I found length to be specially important for maneuverability when snorkeling near riffs. Plus it's easier to put on/off, and it's not a burden during the whole ...


1

It seems like you buy bodysurf/bodyboard fins as @Brent point it out. Lifeguard (like me) enjoy it too, as it allow you to do medium length sprint (50 to 100 meters, like 100 to 300 feet) at record speed, while being easy to carry in your hand all day long. These are great for strong acceleration, sharp turn, quick dive under waves and take waves to surf it....


1

Just to clarify, short, stiff fins are often preferred by body-surfers (and I believe body-boarders, although I don't body-board) for several reasons: The swimmer usually has only a handful of kicks to accelerate and take off on the shoulder of the wave. Softer fins have a slight 'lag' in the acceleration phase, and put less pressure on the legs, but at the ...


1

Firstly, I must ask, is this for surface swimming (e..g snorkling) or for diving? I myself get so fed up with trying to use fins for surface swimming that I simply refuse to anymore, and I think for that case it's a personal thing. For me it just doesn't propel me much there, and constantly is an issue with breaking the surface and not getting much out of ...


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