74

Eventually some part of your brain is going to start thinking, "Holy (expletive), Rattlesnake! I'm gonna loose an extremity! I'm gonna die! What's going to happen to my family? Why did I even come on this (expletive) trip? OhGodOhGodOhGodOh...." Then another part of your brain is going to tell the first part to stop thinking like that, it is not ...


43

Anybody who has severe allergies which could lead to anaphylaxic shock should carry appropriate medication with them. Typically, that would consist of: An antihistamine (e.g. benadryll) An epinephrine auto-injector (aka "Epi-Pen") Benadryll is available over the counter and you should have it in your first aid kit. Epi is by prescription only (at least in ...


29

No, it is not safe to use denatured alcohol for two good reasons: Denatured alcohol refers to a class of ethanol produced for industrial uses that has been "denatured," which essentially means "made undrinkable" by mixing other compounds that are toxic or unpleasant to humans. The thing is, you, as the consumer, have no idea what exactly was mixed in. ...


25

I disagree greatly with all previous answers. Pushing the hook the rest of the way through is very painful and takes much longer than the method I describe below. My preferred method is to wrap some strong wire around the bend of the hook, press down on the eye to disengage the barb and pull on the wire very firmly. The hook will pop right out and not ...


23

Often the best solution is to get some fine nosed pliers and push the point of the hook out and through, making an 'exit wound'. This is often preferable to trying to pull a barbed hook back the way it went in. Obviously some common sense needs to be employed here... I'm really talking about a small hook caught in a fold of skin. Of course if you are in ...


21

There's a lot of dubious assertions in the answers here, and frankly some bad advice regarding how long to wait before treating a blister. We just had a lecture on blister management in my WFR class yesterday, so I'll give this a go. The answer to "should I deflate this blister" comes down to a very simple question: Will it pop itself if I don't? Any ...


21

Practice. I watched my dad nearly slice his thumb off while cutting wood, in the middle of nowhere in France, with a meat cleaver when I was about 10. He turned to me and said 'Go to your mum, ask her for the electrical tape. Tell her it's urgent and to hurry.' I remember it clearly to this day, he didn't panic, he didn't jump up and wave his now hanging ...


18

I have lots of leeches in my (otherwise) lovely swimming hole which is in a creek just as it leaves a lake. I read up on possible leech deterrents and now I rub my exposed skin with just about any kind of skin cream and they all seem to work. Waterproof sunblock is my current favorite but I've also used Off (Eucalytus) and even ordinary moisturizer. I haven'...


18

There is hardly anything very effective first aid as such, considering the fact that you are 5 hrs walk from any medical facility. I guess I can assume that you will be roaming in rain forests of Agumbe or anywhere in Southern Western Ghats since you referred to King Cobras. If in India, you would definitely like to take a look at The Big Four. ...


18

This was done on the American Frontier, and during the American Civil War. According to this journal from the American Medical Association printed in 1893, it is a good antiseptic. Apparently, alcohol works by breaking down the protein bonds. It looks like this question has been asked by many other people, and other than historical sources, there doesn't ...


17

For wounds with heavy bleeding or that are deep, the standard practice is to: Apply direct pressure to the wound. Elevate the injury to decrease blood flow. In short, if the flow of blood is high enough that it won't clot then you want to impede the bleeding by whatever means possible. As mentioned elsewhere, tourniquets are a last resort, where the loss ...


16

First I will describe the stages of frostbite focusing on how to detect them and what are the implications of each. Secondly I will address handling frostbite. Classification Stages of frostbite are divided into two classes: Damage to the skin (first and second stage) and damage including deeper tissue (nerves, muscles, tendons) (third and fourth stage). ...


16

Is whiskey a good disinfectant in an emergency situation while in the outdoors? Ideally any strong alcohol, whether whiskey, vodka, tequila or some other strong liquor should not be used to clean wounds. But in an a survival situation, I would not hesitate to use whiskey or some other strong liquor such as vodka on a wound while in the great outdoors. ...


15

Self-assessment is difficult because your level of consciousness (LOC) may be impaired. Unfortunately, one's own state of mind is also very difficult to self-assess. I'll list here a brief overview of some of the "self-checks" you can do, but (as I'm sure you're already aware), getting a second person to check you out as soon as possible will help ensure you ...


15

They are often basically the same but there are often three additional items listed: tick tweezers louse-comb foldable cone (to be preferred), muzzle or strips of cloth to prevent biting (its wounds etc.) Especially the tick tweezers seems to be pretty useful of course. Other pet-specific supplies to assume Pet first-aid book Phone numbers: your ...


14

Seawater is not itself sterile, in fact, it has all kinds of organisms. Salt in a wound is likely to hurt, and saltwater won't be a particularly effective antiseptic. With wound cleaning, it's always a question of trade-offs. It might be better to use less-than-sterile water to clean an extremely dirty wound if infection is otherwise inevitable. However, ...


14

The concern is valid; your basic plan should be to stay calm and not increase your heart rate. If other options for evacuation are not available, slowly walking yourself out is the best remaining option. The bitten area can swell quite a bit, so remove nearby jewelry or clothing to prevent them from turning into tourniquets. If you have a pen you can use ...


13

You could do a lot worse than strip them and get in a sleeping bag with them, and indeed this used to be instructed as standard first aid for hypothermia. However, as far as I'm aware this has now changed and the recommended approach is to construct a 1 person thermal burrito / hyper-wrap. It's done as follows (content taken from the alpine institute blog!) ...


13

First, this answer is not a substitute for proper training. I recommend taking a class in Wilderness First Aid or higher to be better prepared for things like treating hypothermic people. Second, hypothermia is a term that tends to have different connotations with different people. Sometimes what people call "hypothermia" is just a very cold individual, or ...


12

Decide depending upon the impact that person has on the group and the event. If he/she is a crucial member to keep going, may be the group should agree to call it off, and decide to turn back or set up a camp, depending upon the supplies and the location. You'd never want to make someone walk back home is he/she is really in not a shape to sustain the ...


12

The usual place this happens is a finger, ear, occasional other places. If you are close to town, and have good insurance by all means, tape it in place to minimize movement, and go see a doctor. I'm assuming that, given the forum, medical help is not at hand. Clip the line off the hook. You don't need to make things worse, when someone trips on the rod,...


12

This story says that a saline solution was used and it was not pulled off. Dr Fogg says tweezers were not an option as simply pulling the leech off could leave its head lodged in the eyeball, leading to infection. A check of the medical literature revealed two other suggestions - using an anaesthetic on the eye to put the leech to sleep, or salted ...


12

Know what to do Make an effort to know how to deal with the risks of <activity> The most important thing I learn when I attend first aid courses is not the treatment of the injury, but knowing what to do encourages calmness. Staying calm helps you make better decisions about how to deal with the situation and usually keeps the casualty calm. In the ...


11

You don't want to immobilize a dislocated shoulder. You really need to fix it. Even if held at just the right angle and not being jostled around, a dislocated shoulder hurts. After a while the muscles will tighten, then start spasming periodically. Then it really hurts and it becomes much more difficult to get it back in. There are some dangers in ...


11

As for the reason why it is risky: You cannot know if the guy you want to help has any disease that can be transferred via blood contact, such as HIV or Hepatitis. Already small wounds in your own skin –you might not recognize it as a wound at all– might be enough to transfer the disease, therefore it would be quite risky to just stick your hand into any ...


11

First of all, stop strenuous activity. If possible, get back into a warmer environment. If not, breathe through your nose as much as possible. This can also be used as a preventative measure. Hydrate properly.


11

Typically runners exert their lungs the most if compared to Mountaineers. I am strictly not comparing with Swimmers of course. First, why would it happen, how do you know whats happening: Do we normally catch cold, runny nose when its cold outside? Normally we do. "How much cold" can vary from person to person though. Getting runny nose is one of the body'...


11

I keep on telling people that they should never try to restrict the blood flow by using a tourniquet or a tight restricting bandage. It has been a stupid myth among people, visualizing that the snake bites a person and the venom gets mixed in blood like you dip a color paint brush into the water bowl and water turns into a different color. This is not how it ...


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