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20

You can kill tropical fish by freezing them, or even just letting them cool down. From the outdoors perspective, most game and eatable fish are not tropical. There is a post on a sister site Fish “coming back to life” after being frozen and there are many google finds about frozen fish coming back to life. From personal experience I recall my grandfather ...


16

Ice water will not kill any fish quickly. Some fish even live in ice or icy water. A tropical fish may go into shock, but it won't die right for a long time. I think people may believe the fish is dead because the body has stiffened, but that's just a function of the cold and doesn't indicate a dead fish. The fastest way to kill a fish would really be to ...


11

As gerrit notes, swimming in lakes is common in Scandinavia, and there's not a lot of fauna in them that could even potentially be harmful. Some lakes in southern Sweden apparently do have leeches, which can attach themselves to exposed human skin or, in some cases, to the insides of body cavities. If you were planning to swim in a leech-infested lake (a ...


10

This appears to be a Tilapia sparrmanii Pictures: Brief description: Tilapia sparrmanii, the banded tilapia, or vlei kurper, is a widespread and adaptable cichlid fish that is found in warmer freshwater habitats of southern Africa. They prefer water with ample plant cover, and occur naturally as far north as DR Congo and Tanzania. They have ...


9

Jellyfish, while mobile, are not capable of much evasion. They can steer their bodies, but they are limited in their ability to get out of the way of a faster organism - which is why the majority rely on their stinging tentacles, and migration up to the surface and back down to follow food. One thing many jellyfish can do to avoid damage to themselves when ...


8

Swimming is a popular summer pas-time in Sweden and Finland. In rural areas, it's still common for schools to have swimming lessons outside, in lakes. I'm pretty sure there's no risk from fauna in Swedish lakes. If you go too far north, you could risk hypothermia ;).


8

Spade Hook That is very simply called an eyeless hook or a spade hook. Spade hooks are old school, but there are enough people that still say they're preferable to eyed hooks, in fly fishing at least, you tie both eyed and spade hooks basically the same. Some people pass the line almost arbitrarily through the eye on an eyed hook, but it's easier to tie ...


7

In certain BC rivers, fishing is catch and release only, it's illegal to fish with anything but a single barbless hook. I have a whole tackle box full of spoons that have been hacked to death by a pair of side cutters in order to make them legal for catch and release. When you hook a fish, reel them in normal, but pick them out of the water with a net, don'...


7

It is absolutely not humane - in fact it is by FAR one of the most CRUEL methods to euthanize a fish. Regardless of them being tropical or not, before they are sufficiently cold enough to die, their blood crystallizes and they basically end up with ice shards shooting through them. Ouch. This is a very common question on aquarium forums and message boards ...


6

Well, it seems that the mystery was solved: it is a common roach with a guanin deficiency that causes them to have a different colour, as explained by this ecologist (in Swedish).


6

The web site UtahFishFinder claims a 99% survival rate (assuming the fish hit the water). I presume height of drop could influence it. They drop the fish anywhere between 50 and 150 feet: Once he's over the desired lake, the pilot evaluates his approach and exit, plane speed, windage and altitude, and lines up with the lake. While over the lake, he ...


5

Much of our clothing, particularly outdoorsy technical clothing, is made of plastic (nylon is a plastic). The plastic in our clothing is largely inert, but it is subject to mechanical wear and tear. Every time you wash your plastic clothing small bits of bit are broken off, and are distributed throughout the environment. How far they go depends on how your ...


5

It is a very pale colored smallmouth bass. The eyes are red , the upper jaw of smallmouth bass extends to the middle of the eye like the picture shows, the body has brown vertical bands and is sandy yellow in color. This particular specimen is very pale in color! The smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) is a species of freshwater fish found within the ...


5

It appears to be a smallmouth bass based on this MN DNR link.


4

Getting the fish home fresh is more important than how long it actually lives on the stringer. If you don't have a cooler and you don't have a live tank a stringer is your best option. Water is almost always cooler than the air, keeps them moist, and will keep them alive for a period of time. Do as little damage as possible removing the hook and use ...


4

A fish can survive a few hours on a stringer, but they're generally not the best approach. The fish will struggle against the stringer and injure itself, which can damage the fish and raises other questions (as @Desorder highlighted in comments). I recommend finding another option for storing your catch.


4

Adding to @acpilot's answer, it appears New Brunswick, while not part of the native range of the smallmouth bass, is part of the expanded range of the fish. That further leads to a possible confirmation of the species. Here is the native and expanded range of the species in the United States according to the US Geological Survey: This map doesn't show the ...


3

Many articles on the Internet now recommend putting the stringer (or clips on a stringer) through the lower lip or bottom of the mouth, not through the gills. A gill stringer not only injures the gills but also impedes "breathing", i.e. moving water into the mouth and through the gills; also, don't put the clip through both lips, for the latter reason. If ...


3

which is the best moment in order not to endanger the species? Pacific salmon only spawn once in their life. At the point when they have spawned they are generally not considered eatable. There is no moment to catch them and "not to endanger the species" Salmon change color to attract a spawning mate. Pacific salmon use all their energy for returning to ...


3

Here's a decent video detailing just how to do it: Basically filet it like any other fish. Remove the "dark meat" that is pungent and distasteful. Then remove the row of spines. Taste tests described in the video show that virtually everyone preferred asian carp (poached or fried) over the other varieties such as tilapia. Here's another one narrated with ...


3

Eat them. Nothing wrong with eating them. Shrimp are shrimp and there fine to eat as long as they are alive (or at least recently dead) when you start to cook them. I wouldn't want to cook shrimp that have been dead for 12 hours in the sun, but live shrimp kept in a bait well or cooler should be quite good. And they make for an awesome snack while (before) ...


3

I heard a news story about a year ago about some group along the Mississippi River that was catching these carp and processing them for human consumption. I wish I could give more details. They hired some top chefs to come up with recipes for the fish as they appear to be good to eat. The carp are not going away. They are only going to increase. So, why ...


3

I doubt that there are specific dates, other than late spring to early summer. It also depends on the water temperature, and I am sure that fluctuates from year to year slightly. Carp spawn in late spring to early summer, over aquatic vegetation. They may choose a shallow, weedy bay. After rains have swelled their home river over its banks, they may move ...


2

The fish in the above image is a Mayan cichlid (Mayaheros urophthalmus sym. Cichlasoma urophthalmum). Short Description "Cichlasoma urophthalmus is a medium sized cichlid fish. Adults range from 8 to 22 cm standard length (SL) and a maximum of 600 g weight. Important traits useful for distinguishing C. urophthalmus: 1) seven (rarely 8) prominent dark ...


2

There's an excellent Asian method. These directions are for a good size carp. Buy 1 short 3/4 inch thick coco lumber, 3 inch wide board. Some places have it in a scrap box. Shape it like a flat hair brush. Drill 6 holes in it offset. Put 6 wood screws in holes, 1 1/4 to 1 1/2 inch long. This is to scale them. Run a sharp pointed knife along top of spine ...


2

I would just place them in a ziplock bag and freeze them until you go fishing again. It's worth point out that people going fishing with frozen bait, and I doubt it would smell. The single most widely available bait in Florida is the Frozen Shrimp. Many bait shops bag and freeze any shrimp that die in their live shrimp holding tanks at a discounted ...


2

That looks like a mangrove snapper, (there are quite a few different names of snapper) and I am making the identification on two things, the pattern of diamond shaped spots and the top fin being whole and not split into two fins.. See this picture of a mangrove snapper. Image Source


1

Most Likely, you are correct and it is a Pumpkinseed Sunfish. Though, pan fish interbreed and it could be mixed. The fish identification page (PDF:20/ Printed:37) in the 2019 Michigan Fishing Guide has the Pumpkinseed Sunfish looking the closest to your fish. Warning, the link opens a PDF.


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