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23

Alaska Department of fish and Game: Statewide Definitions Bait means any substance applied to fishing gear for the purpose of attracting fish by scent, including fish eggs in any form, natural or preserved animal, fish, fish oil, shellfish, or insect parts, natural or processed vegetable matter, and natural or synthetic chemicals. Or, in layman's ...


12

Sounds fairly normal for a not so great day. That's why it's called 'Fishing' and not 'Catching'! Size and color choice for lures has a lot to do with success as well. The traditional wisdom is that you must choose a color based on the stain of the water. If the water is very clear then the lure should be very close to the natural prey/food choices (shad ...


12

Yes it means no bait as in absence of bait. Single as apposed to double, triple, ... hooks Fish will strike at lures / spinners. Especially if they don't have much experience with fisherman. What is not clear is if artificial bait is OK (a rubber worm). A triple hook below would not be in compliance


9

I fish for everything from 9" brook trout to 15 lb. bluefish to 40 lb. striped bass on both fly rod and spinning tackle, and honestly I don't think I would say that one is better than the other except for the fact that with 1 piece rods you don't worry about losing your tip, OR that with multi-piece rods you can cart them around more easily (and reduce the ...


8

You have two basic options: You can carve a hook with or without a barb from wood or bone. Some examples of the finished product are here1: You can splice two pieces of material together for an improvised hook. This is probably the easiest way to make a treble hook and/or a hook for snagging fish. I personally think this is the way to go because it feels ...


8

Spade Hook That is very simply called an eyeless hook or a spade hook. Spade hooks are old school, but there are enough people that still say they're preferable to eyed hooks, in fly fishing at least, you tie both eyed and spade hooks basically the same. Some people pass the line almost arbitrarily through the eye on an eyed hook, but it's easier to tie ...


8

Go to your local fishing shop. They usually can give you some solid advice. Good fishing gear does not have to be expensive, even for larger fish. Once you get really specialized, you might need an edge. Until then it is smooth sailing. If you really just want to go fishing about four times a year, grab a light to medium spinning rod, a light to medium ...


7

Perhaps this is too obvious an answer but there's a little thumb-screw bolt that goes through the reel from the other side and screws into the handle to keep it in place. It sounds like this was loose when you started fishing and completely detached from the handle while you were fishing. It's normal that you'd have to tighten this from time to time but may ...


7

Make a surgeon's loop in the end of the leader. Use a loop-to-loop connection to join the leader to the fly line. Use a surgeon's knot to join the leader to the tippet. This isn't the strongest knot, but it is small, quick to tie and reliable. Look on the Grog's Knots website to find lots of other knots. The tippet is usually 3-4 feet, with a total ...


7

Catching fish depends on so many variables that it is hard to pinpoint what went wrong. Depending on weather, time of the day, and season, fish are located at different parts of the water body and at different depths. Changes in water temperature and atmospheric pressure affect how fish and other aquatic life forms behave, and it all connects: aquatic insect ...


7

If you are looking at two piece rods because of their more compact size, you may also want to consider telescoping rods. I've had (3) telescoping rods & all but the Amazon-special-carbon-fiber job have served me well (the no-name brand amazon one broke into many pieces...), but I've loved the Mako Calypso 8' rod & my much smaller Shakespeare ...


7

Unless there is a certain terminology for "backside" plugs, this is a plug (or as I know it: a wobbler. No idea which term is more commonly used around where you live). Wikipedia Link I had to bust out my detective hat and pipe to find information on these ones, but I stumbled upon this: an article about this bait They are(?)/were made by bomber, and ...


7

It would be good to know if you are certain that there actually ARE fish bigger than the palm of your hand in the area. But let's assume that there are. Whenever I come across suspicious fish that won't bite anything, I try two different tactics. The first and almost always the best is to use live bait - fish, not worms - of some sort. If you see schools of ...


6

I have a lot of 2 pieces, one 4 piece, and 1 one piece. The one piece is my go to rod because I fish at night often (I live 3 blocks away from the Sacramento River). I'll have a tendency of not paying much attention of how my guides are aligned and end up casting to the extreme left or right initially. I never have to worry about that with my one piece rod ...


6

I've been very successful catching northern pike in Alberta with the following setup. I should clarify that I was catching pike up to 18" long, and my setup reflects that. b) 2", 1/2 oz Spoons. The 5 of Diamonds (red on yellow) and red stripe on white also works well. http://www.lenthompson.com/fishing-lure-patterns.html c) Spinning reel, one with an ...


5

I'll try to answer some of the questions you have: b) The kind of lure I normally use for snatching pike is a wobbler, when it comes to bait, small fish(eg. common roach) usually piques the pikes interest.(no pun intended.) f) The pike likes to muddle around the reeds and similar environments, so you either need to go get it or make it come to you.


5

Sure you can use anything as a bait really. Think of a crushed up can as a funky spinner (it's going to spin no matter what you do to it). It's shiny, flashy and moves erratically like an injured fish. I have also seen lures made by folding bottle caps around a hook shank.


5

From what I understand, the floatation characteristics should be relatively similar since both types of hair contain "chambers" that keep in air and provide floatation. An important difference is how they behave when tied. Deer hair will flare more when wrapped, while the elk hair will tend to remain straighter under the same wrapping conditions. I found ...


5

It will be fine. There is no issue going from salt to fresh. Usually saltwater gear includes lines and tackles that are supposed to catch bigger fish deeper in the ocean so you should probably try the smallest lures. The line will be quite visible but if you are inexperienced it will not be much of a problem - I usually fret over line visibility but I don't ...


4

You do need to rephrase the question better, but I can still provide this answer. Pike will go after anything that bass will. Spinners, plugs, jerk baits, Texas rigged worms, etc etc. just about anything so long as it within reach. Trout need a more gentle approach, the Mepps style lures and perhaps the gulp worms are your best bet for trout. Real worms ...


4

I assume you are asking about striped bass. Although I have never fished for stripers (or rockfish, depending on where you are) on the Pacific side of the USA, this is the species that surf anglers in the Northeast target most passionately. Many of the best places to find them are those with strong currents and places to hide in ambush. These conditions ...


4

I'm not sure if you're talking fresh or salt. In salt water I used various plugs (primarily cedar) in some really beefy conditions. 1000+ miles offshore, tradewind belt, 4 meter seas, etc. In those conditions (trolling), the plug is mimicking a bait fish that's at the surface, occasionally popping and bubbling. I have a cedar plug with a lot of teeth marks ...


4

Your choice of an ugly stick is fantastic. I fish more specialized rods now, but I have owned many ugly sticks over the years, and they are rock solid performers. For the "small-water" fishing destinations and the species you say you'll be targeting, I would go for something in the 5-7' range - in a light rod power (to use Shakespeare parlance). Moderate to ...


4

I assume you are considering a new reel with multiple spools. The reel's performance will not be affected except that with a lighter line you will be able to fit more backing. In a 5wt setup that usually wouldn't offer any benefit. One potential issue with using a much larger reel is the balance. You may be able to cast well with a poorly balanced setup, ...


4

Should work fine if he is set up for smaller fish. Even a set up for large fish would work but you would need to put a light line on it. Saltwater reel is designed to withstand the corrosive effects of salt. It works fine in fresh water. As for bait and lure it will depend on the fish. A local tackle shop can help you out. Your uncle knows his gear. ...


4

This is likely caused by soft baits eating the plastics. Older plastics weren't made to resist the solvents that make soft baits soft and squishy. Check out: https://www.bassmaster.com/tips/charlie-hartley-right-way-store-soft-plastics http://www.carolinasportsman.com/details.php?id=14260


3

This type of dry fly floatant powder is quite effective at drying off smaller flies. I believe it's the same silica gel that is used to keep packaged electronics dry. But I typically just press flies between folds of a cotton t-shirt briefly. This will draw most of the water out and restore "floatability" to the fly. It should also leave it dry enough to ...


3

Tons of rod and reel packages out there to get you started. I've had plenty of success with the basic Shimano rod/reel combos that are under $50. For bait and lures you have a some choices: Spinners simulate wounded prey (minnows, etc) - the wobble action attracts fish through their lateral line Weighted flies - wooly buggers, bead-head nymphs, etc. ...


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